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^m A 



A PUBLICATION OF «» SCHOLASTIC INC. 



NOVEMBER 1985 



VOLUME 3 
NUMBER 11 



>^ 



More Power for the Home 



Your Guide to Computers 

Word Processing: 
What^The 
Best Software? 

K-POWER 

Game Strategies, 
Music Programsl 
and a Contest 

How to Use f 
Your Computer 
With Your 
Preschooler 

A First: 

Original Mac ^^ 
Programs ^ 





ORIGINAL PROGR 

ATARI, COMMODORE 

TRS-80 COLOR COMPUTl 



BONUS 




d \ §§s>* 




Why every Md should have 
an Apple after school 



Today there are more 
A|iple"computei's in schools 
than any other compLiter. 

Unfoitiinately there 
are still more kicis in schools 
than A})ple computers. 

So innocent )'oungsters 
(like \'our own) may have 
to fend off packs of bully 
nerds to get some time on a 
computer. 

Which is why it makes 
good sense to buy them an 
Apple lie Pereonal Computer 
of their ven^ own. 



Send them home K^! ^^Z ■' .. 

m a mod srhnnl wstptn ^^^ ^^^^ preparation programs 

10 a gooa scnooi system, f^^, ^^1,^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^ 

The lie is just like the leading In fact, the lie can run 
computer in education, the over 10,000 programs in all. 
Apple He. Only smaller About More than a kw of which you 
the size of a three-ring note- might be interested in youreelf 
book, to be exact. 

Of coui'se, since the 
lie is the legitimate off- 
spring of the He, it can 
access the worlds largest 
library of educational 
software, EveiMhing 
from Sticb^ear 




1K 



For example, the 
best-selling, AjipleWorks'' 
3-in-l integrated soft- 
3 ware packige. Pei'sonal 
finance and tax pro- 
grams. Diet and fit- 
ness programs. 
Not to mention 



iin programs for the whole 
family. IJke"Genetic Mapping" 
and "Enzyme Kinetics!' 

One Apple that won't 
leave them hungry 

The Ajiple lie is easy to set up 
and learn. And it comes com- 
plete with most eventhing 
you need to start computing 
in one box. 

Including a free, e^isy-to- 
use 4-diskette coui'se to teach 
you all about the lie— wiien 
your kids get tired of your 
questions. 

As well its a long list of 
built-in features that would 
add about S800 to the cost of 
a smaller-minded computer 

The features include: 
128K of internal memoiT— 
'ds> powerfiil as the average 
office computer. 



adding accessories, like our 
new ColorMonitor lie, Image- 
Writer™ II printer and the A}}ple 
Personal Modem 300/1200. 

A feast for their eyes. 

The big 14-inch ColorMonitor 
He displa\5 crisp, color graph- 

UUimMLlI' 



removing the sprocket paper.* 
If local color isn't enough, 
you can talk to the rest of the 
world tlii'ough our new wall- 
mounted Ai:)ple Personal 
Modem 300/1200. With it, you 
can do your banking at home, 
check \'our stocks, gain access 




Tix most impiiiar iKiipk'mk plu^ right into tl.v Imi' qfthe.-ipplf lie. 



ics or a high resolution 80- 
column monochrome text for 
word processing. 

You can print shaip color 
graphics, too, with our i"iew 
ImageWriter 11. It also prints 






Tbi' lim/fiAlnivr lljiniits bl<ih tiiudity 
color giripbics. 

A built-in disk drive 
that could drive up the price 
ofa less-senior machine 
considerably. 

And built-in adaptors for 



And fpL'dkiug of high qimlily aihir. inlrinliiaiig 
ColorMonitor lie 

near-letter-qualit\' text in 
black and white, quickly and 
quietly And, with its new 
SheetFeeder, you can switch 
to single sheets without 



to all kinds of information 
libraries and much more. 

Which would all add up to 
a veiy impressive list of expand- 
able accessories if it weren't 
for all the others. Like an A}iple- 
Mouse. And an extra disk 
drive when the time comes, 

Avoid growing pains. 

So while your children's shoe 
sizes and appetites continue 
to grow at an alarming rate, 
there's one thing you know 
can keep up with them. Their 
Apple He. 

To learn more about it, 
\'isit 'an\' authorized ^\\t 
dealer Or talk to your own 
computer expeits. 

As soon ^is they get home 
from school. ^ 



' OjHiomi! uavAniy nm iKjtmlxmlfTr Imi^mter II. © l%'5 .'ppk Qmipiikr Inc. .^e nmhlx .fpk /oi,™ .-yi/MUirb. iiml //wrt^'lfrrtr mv InkhiiHrls if-l/i/^li- Otmimhx Uk 
SIkhhw ,*;/v,( is ii tmkimirk iifqilimum liesmiin: Ririm mllmiza! .fjik deiikr nmrrmi. cull (800) 538-96%. In Oimiiiii. aill (800) 268-7796 ar (800) 268-7637. 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 2 






F 




Y 




R 



SORE 



s 



THOMSON 



To those of you \vho stare and stare— and stare 
at computers, "blessed relief has arrived. Thomson'" 
monitors. We promise clearer, crispcr resolution, 
remarkable colors and print-like text.Thomson builds 
a full line of monitors, from basic monochrome to high- 
resolution color models. All are designed to fulfill your 
needs today, and sophisticated enough to fulfill your 
needs in the future. 

niomson monitors are designed and built by Thomson. 
a S6 billion international corporation. They re going to 
change the way America looks at computers. 

Ask your local computer dealer for aTliomson 
monitor, or call 1-213-821-2995, ext. 38, for the Thomson 
dealer nearest you. Then take a stare at aTliomson 
monitor. It's a sight for sore eyes.'" 

'Idi'\ Ifr.tCOji ITMllliun.s;, [r:i:k-iii..rk,,l'n:..in~»i~ -\ 




M.aWLMJWiiSI. l:;-iJi«,Mi.,l..ii.ivmiiii(rauh 

RGBI rnjf>r mfifiilur wilh u-w switi-hnnd 

iKvi-ElaitiiniittKTren. 





THOMSON O 



©1985 Thomson Consumer Products Corporation 



CIRCtE READER SERVFCE 46 



PUBLISHED BY SCHOLASTIC INC. 



NOVEMBER 
1985 



FAMILY 



VOLUME 3 
NUMBER 11 




FEATURES 



K-POWER 



PROGRAMMING 



DEPARTMENTS 



35 

BUYER'S GUIDE TO 

GENERAL>PURPOSE 

COMPUTERS 

by Joe Gelman and Nick 
Sullivan 

Our roundup of new and 
proven computers can help 
you choose the best 
machine for your 
education, entertainment, 
and business needs. 

ai 

HOLIDAY HELPER 

by Marlene Anne 
Bumgarner 

Sit back and relax while 
your computer plans the 
menu, decks the halls, and 
spreads good cheer. 

44 

WORD PROCESSORS 

by Robin Raskin 

New tools for the age-old 
task of writing. 

PLUS: A SAMPLER OF WORD- 
PROCESSING PROGfiAMS FOR 
THE NOVICE AND THE PRO 

49 

THE NEW AMIGA 

by John Jainschigg 

A look at Commodore's 
newest arrival. Graphics, 
sound, and multi- 
tasking give this mouse- 
based powerhouse a 
special personality. 

PLUS: A ROUNDUP OF AMIGA 

sorrwARE 



83 

Attention Gamers: Here 

Conies Accolade! 

An interview with the 
founders of a hot, new 
game-design company. 

84 

Game Strategy 

Tips, tricks, and hints. 

86 
Microtones 

"The Nutcrackers" popular 
Dance of the Sugar-Plum 
Fairy goes hi-tech. 

90 
Cempucopia 

A little program for the big 
task of saving to disk. 

90 
Contest 

Stump Dr. Kursor with a 
problem. 

Page 4 1 




55 

THE PROGRAMMER 

56 

TIPS TO THE TYPIST 

57 

FUN/LEARNING 

PROGRAM 

Test your vocabulary 
against a friend's and learn 
about computer logic with 
Word Wars. For ADAM, 
Apple & Macintosh, Atari, 
Commodore & VlC-20, 
IBM PC & compatibles. 
Tl- 99/4A, and TRS-80 
CoCo & Models III & 4. 

65 

ARCADE GAME 

You'll need fast reflexes 
and nerves of steel to beat 
Get 'Em. For ADAM. Apple 
& Macintosh, Atari. 
Commodore, IBM PC & 
compatibles, and TRS-80 
CoCo & Models III and 4. 

70 

FEATURE PROGRAM 

Put your flics on a disk 
with Home Information 
Manager, a mini-data-basc 
program for the Apple. 



NEW PRODUCTS 

93 

SOFTWARE GUIDE AND 

REVIEWS 

Twenty-four at-a-glance 

reviews. 




EDITOR'S NOf E 

9 
LETTERS 

10 

HOME/MONEY 

MANAGEMENT 

by Robin Raskin 

Computerize your family's 
medical records. 

16 
TELECOMPUTING 

by Robin Raskin 

Shopping online; Let your 
computer do the walking. 

25 

HOME-SCHOOL 

CONNECTION 

by Christine Z. Cataldo 

The computer and your 
preschooler. 

[>LUS: TRIED-AND-TRUE 
SOITWARE 

28 
GAMES 

by James Delson 

Pretzels and popcorn fun, 

32 

COMPUTING CLINIC 

106 
CLASSIFIED 

108 

ADVERTISERS' INDEX 

FAMILY COMPin-ING USSN 073HG079) la pu^3- 
lishrd monthly by Scholasilr Inc.. 730 Broadway. 
New York. Nil' 10003. Sub^crlpUons: in Ihr U.S. 
aild po^^^S^lons, 12 is&urs Tor S19,B7; outside 
llie U,S. add S6 [surface malll or S23-97 |a|r- 
mjill, OlPict of ptJblicaiiQn; 351 Garv-er Hd,. P.O. 
Box 2700, Monroe. OH 45050-2700, S<-cond- 
class posiafle paid at Monroe. OH 4505O-S99S 
and addiiionaJ officts, POSTMASTER^ Send ad- 
dress changes and nOtlCc of unilclh-cred copies 
lu FAMILY CDMPIhTING, P,0. Box 2511. Boulder. 
CO ^0302. Printed In U.S,A. CopyTlght ۥ 1965 
Ijy Sn^holastic Inc. A\\ rights reserved. 

COVKK PUOrOGRM'H UY WALTEH WICK 

Page 49 



EDITOR'S NOTE 



THE 

THINKING 

SEASON 



Despite all the fuss about last-min- 
ute shoppers, this holiday season ac- 
tually is a time of planning and 
thinking. Card lists. Gift lists. Guest 
lists and menus. It seems endless. 
But for these special once-a-year fes- 
tivities, it's important to get things 
right. 

In recent years, the computer has 
become one of the most popular new 
gifts of the season. And. of all the 
gifts I can think of, it's the one that 
requires the most thought and plan- 
ning, A computer is not a good im- 
pulse buy. There's probably even a 
direct correlation between pre- 
purchase planning and post- 
purchase satisfaction. 

That's why we're running our 
"Buyer's Guide to Computers" (page 
35 ) this issue: to give you more time 
to think and plan, and a greater 
chance that you'll be satisfied with 
your purchase. The choices before 
consumers this year represent a de- 
parture from the past. New comput- 
er models boasting more power at 
reasonable prices complicate deci- 
sion-making and raise a bevy of new 
questions to consider before taking 
out your checkbook or credit card. 

In this issue, we're delivering on 
our promise to readers of increased 
coverage of the Macintosh, the first 
of those new computers. 'Vou'll find 
both original programs for the Mac 
(page 55) and more Mac software re- 
views than usual (page 93). Although 
Apple continues to direct the Mac to 
the business community, our mail 
and our sources indicate that a large 
number of Macs sold arc making 
their way into the home. 

For computer owners with the 




wherewithcil to start planning now 
for the weeks ahead. I recommend 
our Telecomputing article about on- 
line shopping (page 16) and "Holiday 
Helper," our piece on preparing for 
the holidays — computer-style (page 
41), 

My own mission for the holidays is 
to find the most personal, original 
ways to express and demonstrate my 
feelings and appreciation to people 
who mean the most to me, A lot of 
them are my fellow staff members on 
fAMiLY COMPUTING. They've been plan- 
ning, for what seems like forever, 
ways to make your holidays special. 
We hope you enjoy our efforts as 
much as we did creating the results. 

Most of all, we hope your holidays 
start with a lot to be thankful for. 
May you have the happiest of 
Thanksgivings, 



<^:!^.^*..6j*^ tii-x^ 



CLAtlDlA COHL 
EDirOR-IN-CHIEF 



SCHOLASTIC INC. CORPORATIt 

Maurice H. KniTliison, foundt-r. IHU.'j-UlB;! 

PKESIDENT. CHIEF E-VECUTIVE OFKICKK. AND CHAIKMAN OK THE BOARD: Richard Robinson 

\^CE■CH.^[RMA^ OF THE BOAKD EMERITUS; Jack K. Llppcrl 

NATIttMAL ADVISORT COUNCILS Dr. Sidney P. Marland. Jr.. chairman, former superintendent of schools and 
U.S. CommisslDner of Education • Ur. Grtgorj' Anrig. president. Educational Testing Seri'lce • Elaine Banks, past 
president. Natlmsai Association of Elementary School Principals • Michael J, Guerra. executive director, secondary 
schools. National Catholic Educational Association • Dr. l^la Jane May. mathematics consultant. WInnetka. Illinois, 
public schools • Dr- Wilson RIks. former superlnlcndeni of public Insirucilon. Stale IJcparimcni of Education. 
CallfonilH • Dr. Hichard Ruopp. presldcnl. Dank Street Collcjie of Education. New York. Kew York • Palsy R. Scales, 
library and media specialist. Greenville ISouth Carollnal Middle School • Elaine Slclnkemeycr. president. The 
National PTA 



FAMILY » 
COMPUTING 

730 Broadway. New York. NY 1 0003 

(2121 505-3580 

KurroK-iN-CHiEf; Claudia Cohl 

DE.SKiN uiKtiCTQH Vlnccnt Ceci 

EDITORIAL 

SENIOR KurroHS: June Rogoznica. is'ick Sullivan 

MANAaiNC, t^DrroR- Roxane Farinanfarmaian 

KEViisws EurroK; David Hallcrman 

ASSiSTA>n' KDiTQK: Su/.c(U' i farvpy 

con/iMinKSKAHc'ii AS,sisTAms Kiircn Kane. 

Elizabeth OitkL'.s 

ADMiNisTH/vrivE cooRDiNAToHr Barbara Schullz 

ADMiNiSTHATPi'EASSiSTA.ST; Mlnen'a Jimenez 

co\THitibTiNG EDITOHS Jeffrey Balrstow, 

James Delson. Peter Favaro Ph.D.. Karia Fisk. 

Charles H. Gajeway. Sarah Kortum. 

Anne Kruejjer. Tony Morris, iiobin f^askln 

K KJWEH A.ssisrANTS- Davld Langendoen, 

Damon Osgood. Alex Shakar 

ART 

DESIGN ASSOCIATE: James C. Montalbano 

DESIGN ASSISTANTS 

Doreen Maddox. Susan Taylor. Stephen E. Wilci5.< 

TECHNICAL 

TECiixicAi. DiREcn'OR; Laticc Paavola 

TECiiNiCAi. EDiTOHi Johii Jalrischigg 

ASSOCIATE TECHNICAL EDITOR Jocy Latimer 

ASSOCIATE TECHNICAL EDtrok l.AB SUl'EHVISOR: 

Steven CM. Chen 

TECHNiCAL jVssistants Maurccn Bruno. 

Susan Easum. Howard Kong 



PUBLISHING 

t'um.isHER: Shlrrel Rhoades 

CONTROLLER: Robert H. Bcllone 

i'HonucTioN .MANAGER: David J. Lange 

CIRCULATION DiHECTOH: Deedc Dlckson 

CIRCULATION MUvACEH SlCVC ASICT 

CIRCULATION ANALYST: Robiil Andrews 
PRaHOTiONipHODL'cnos COORDINATOR: Patricia Neai 

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE; Maria GirCSl 

ASSISTANT TO THE PUBLISHER Elizabeth Monaghan 
ADVERTISINO SALES OFFICES 

r\SSOCL\TE PUBLLSHEH 

Paul W. Reiss (2121 505-3585 

ASSOCIATE AD\^RTISINC DIHECTOH: 

Bruce Gardner (2121 505-3588 

EASTERN REPRESENTATIVE 

Jonalhan Wolpert 1212) 505-3628 

HOirritWESTEHN REIiRESEmAllVE: 

Jim Bender 

1201 1 San Vicente Blvd.. Suite 302 

Los Angeles. CA 90049 

(213) 471-3455 

NOBTHivESTERN REPRESECTATH'E: Pamela Tavlop 

385 Sherman Ave.. Suite 1 

Palo Alto. CA 94306 

(415)322-1015 

MARKETINC CONSULIANT: 

Michael H. Tchong 1212) 505-3586 

NATIONAL SALES ASSISTA.NT 

Susan Pienkos (2121 505-3630 

RESEARCH PROMtJTION ASSISTANT: 

Mitlicent Cailendi^r 

TEl.EM.\HKiniNC. DIRECTOR 

Grej; Rapport (212) 505-3587 

lEI.EMAKKETINCJ REPRESENTATIVES; 

Carol Gra^iano 1212) 505-3620 
Sharon E. Sullivan (212) 505-3629 
Megan Van Peebles (212) 505-3636 



NEEP SUBSCRIPTION ASSISTANCE? 

Please send change of address to KAMlI.l' 
COMPUTIKC. P.O. Box 251 1. Boulder, CO 
80302. For other problems, call (8001 525-0643 
and please have a copy of your canceled check 
and mailing label handy. 



4FAMiLVC0MinmNc 



Anewset 

of crayons for children of 

the computer age. 



ColorMe nurtures 
creativity with child's play. 

A child's imagination 
needs little more than tools 
and encouragement to flour- 
ish. That's why Mindscape 
created ColorMe:The 
Computer Coloring Kit, 

Every child can shine 
with ColorMe. Kids from the 
age of fourand up can com- 
pose pictures without pre- 
vious artistic or computer 



paste options using 
predrawn pictures, 

ColorMe gives every 
artist room to grow. 

With ColorMe, 
kids can draw, color, 
and printtheirown creations 
Text can be integrated to 
createoriginal stories. 
The room for creativity 
is limitless, 

ColorMe Pic- 
ture Disks makethis 





expehence,The program disk 
can be used alone or with 
one or more optional picture 
disks for hours of freehand draw- 
ing and thousands of cut and 




coloring kit extra special. 
Choose from Rainbow Brite™ 
Shirt Talesr' Hugga Bunch?^ 
and TINKITONK!:" These 
popular characters are 

Mindscape 

)ftware that challenges the J-nund, 



pred rawn and ready to "cut 
and paste" for added color, 
excitement and fun. 
You can even take the 
ColorMe Supply 
Box with ad- 
hesive-backed 
paper for stickers, 
colored papers, 
buttons, cards, 
envelopes, and 
a binderfor 
original 
coloring 
books, 

ColorMe. The creative 
computer coloring kit 

Open a new world of 
excitement for your child, 
ColorMe does 
more than 
crayons ever 
could. So ask] 
your software 
dealerfor a dem- 
onstration, Then 
take home the fun. 

ColorMe is available on: 
Apple' and Commodore?' 



Softwa 



^•.ItQ^tLAPt .NC 







»» J > -PWJ>H ii , ' -iL >' . ' 




Mindscape, Inc. 3444 Dundee Road. Northbrook, Illinois 60062 
1-800-221 -9884. (In Illinois 1-800-942.7315) 

Copyright ic: 1985. Mindscape. inc. All Righls Reserveti, Apple and Commodore are regislBrad 

trademarks of Aople Computer Inc. and Commodore Business Mactines. Rainbow Bnte. 

Shirt Tales and Hugga Bunch are trademarks of Hallmark Cards Inc.TINKITONK! is a trademark 

ol fiNK TONK. INC. Mind scape is a trademark of Mindscape. I nt 



CIRCIE READER SERVICE 28 



You can find Mindscape's Racter at these fine stores: 



National 
Federated Group 

Alabama 

The Computer Shoppe 
Huntsville 

Alaska 

Computerland 

Ancticrage 

Arkansas 

The Computer Shoppe 
Littte Rock 

California 

Access To Software 

San Francisco 

Affordable Computer 

Systems 

Santa Clara, San Jose 

Alamo Computer Center 

Cupertino 

Alamo Electronic 

ComponEnts 

San Jose 

B, Dalton Sothvare Etc. 

Montclair. Concord. 

Bakerstield. Northndge. San 

Diego. Torrance 

Books f. Bytes 

Cypress 

Boots Camera Electronics 

Fresno 

Computer Lane 

Canoga Park 

Computer Showcase 

Los Angeles 

Crown Book & Software 

Long Beach, Huntington 

Beach. Santa Ana. Encino, 

Lakewood. Pasadena, 

Nonhridge, Hollywood 

Glendale, South Pasadena, 

Studio City. Los Angeles, 

Thousand Oaks, Downey, 

Culver City, Marina Del Rey, 

Sherman Oaks, El Toro. 

Ventura, Woodlanrj Hills, 

Westminster. Palos Verdes. 

Santa fjlonica, Torrance, 

Redondo Beach 

Educational Software 

Cupertino 

Egghead Software 

Sherman Oaks, Orange, San 

Oiego Pasadena, Lawndale 

Futurevisim 

Napa 

Softwaire Centre International 
Santa Ana, Costa Mesa 
Softwaire Shoppe 
Huntington Beach 
Software Galeria 
Orange 

Software House 
Fresno 

Software Service Center 
Tustin 

Software Solution 

Chico 

User Friendly Computers 

Huntington Beach 

Software Station 
Costa Mesa 

Software Supermarket 
Lawndale, West Los 
Angeles, Sherman Oaks 
Software World 
Redding 

Start With Software, Inc. 

Chico 

User Fnendly Computers 

Huntington Beach 

Colorado 

Citadel Computer 
Colorado Springs 



Colorado (cont| 
Kaioo i Company 
Denver 

Cannectlt:ul 

Personal Computer Center 

Norwich 

Software City 

Stamford, Orange, Danbury 

Software Kingdom 

East Hartford. East Windsor 

District ol Columbia 

Crowr Book & Software 
(Three Locations) 

Florida 

Computer Generation 

Planlalion 

Games 'N Gadgets 

Clearv/ater, Orange Park. 

Tallahassee. Jacksonville 

ftlaxicat 

IVIiami 

Program Store 

Clearwater Pinellas Park 

Software Connection 

Ft. Lauderdale 

Software Doctor 

Coral Gables 

Software Shops 

Brandon 

Georgia 

Desktop Software 

Norcross 

Electronics Boutique 

Atlanta 

Games 'N Gadgets 

Atlanta 

Software Atlanta 

Atlanta 

Software City 

Atlanta 

Hawaii 

Software Litirary 
Honolulu 

Idaho 

Software Center Nortliwest 

Boise 

Illinois 

Apprat Computers 

Afiinglon Heights 

B. Dalton Software Etc. 

Chicago 

Computer Outpost 

Schaumburg 

Computerland 

Niles 

Crown Book & Software 

Downers Grove. Hoffman 

Estates. Arlington Heights, 

Orland Park, Niles, Oak Park, 

Skokie, Deerfield, Calumet 

City, Naperville, Chicago, 

Wheaton, Evanston, Oak 

Lawn, Highland Park 

F,D. Software & CA.D.S. 

Roselle 

Software And Beyond 

Schaumburg 

Sofrwafe City 
Arlington Heights 
Susie Software 
Mount Prospect 

Indiana 

B. Dalton Software Etc. 

Indianapolis 

Burkat Computer Center 

South Bend 

Microcomputer. Inc. 

Indianapolis 



Kentui:ky 

Software Source 

Louisville 

The Computer Shoppe 

Louisville 

Videovisions 
Louisville 

Louisiana 

B Oalton Software Etc. 

New Orleans 

Computer Shoppe 

l^etaine 

PEL Computer Center 

Monroe 

Maryland 

Comm Center 

Severna Park 

Computer Works. Inc. 

Annapolis 

Crown Book S Software 

Gaithersburg, Wheaton, 

Annapolis, Bowie, Bethesda, 

Kensington, Rockville, 

Silver Spring, Columbia, 

Greenbelt, Laurel 

Electronics Boutique 

Baltimore 

Games 'N' Gadgets 

Baltimore, Columbia 

Greetings And Readings 
Towson 

Massachusetts 

Atlantic Computers 
Waltham 

Barnes & Noble Bookstore 

Westboro, Boston 

Computer Concepts 

Hanover 

Electronics Boutique 

Holyoke 

Lingo Software 

Franklin 

Softpro 

Burlington 

Soltware City 
West Spring lield 
Soltware Galeria 
Boston 
The Whiz 
Westboro 

Michigan 

Sy Draft, Inc, 
Oak Park 

Minnesota 

B. Dalton Software EtC- 

Minneapolis, Brooklyn Park. 

Minnetonka, Edina, 

Roseville 

Missouri 

Forsyth Computers 
St. Louis 
Soltware To Go 
St, Louis, Clayton 

Nevada 

Century 23 
Las Vegas 

New Hampshire 

Neba Computer 
Plalstow 

Portsmouth Computer Center 

Portsmouth 

Soft Spot 

lilanchester 

New Jersey 

Bamberger's 
Livingston, Menio Park. 
Cherry Hill, Paramus, 
Wayne 

Boise Office Equipment 
North Plainfield 



New Jersey (cont) 

CIA 

South Plainfield 

Disk-DfThe-fJlonth Club 

Fairlawn 

Electronics Boutique 

Rockaway, Voohrhees, 

Woodbridge 

Family Computer Centres 

South Orange, Fairfield 

Games 'N' Gadgets 

Livingston, Wayne, Buriington 

Software City 
Summit 
Wolsten's Inc, 
East Orange 

New Mexico 

B, Dalton Software Etc, 
Albuquerque 

New Yoric 

45th Electro 

New York 

47th Street Photo 

New York 

Advanced Camera 

New York 

Annex Outlet 

New York 

B. Dalton Software Etc, 

Yonkers, New York 

Barnes & Noble Bookstore 

New York 

Binary Orchard Inc. 

Hamburg, West Seneca 

Broadway Computers 

New York 

Byte Shop 

Merrick 

Computer Discount 01 

America 

Huntington 

Compute rware 

East Meadow 

ComputenATorld 

Bayshore 

East 33rd Typewriter 

New York 

Electronic Man 

New York 

Electronics Boutique 

Albany 

Focus Electronic 

Brooklyn 

Four Guys 

New York 

Games N' Gadgets 

Huntington, Garden City, 

Nanuet 

Glossy Photo 
New York 

Great American Software 
Flushing 

Intercontinental 
Flushing 

J & R Computer Outlet 
New York 

J i R Musicworld 
Mew York 

J S S Electronic 
New York 

Lloyd Corner 
New York 

Lloyd's 
New York 

London Luggage 
New York 
Micro Electronics 
Vafley Stream 
Montgomery Grant 
New York 

Park Avenue Video 
New York 



New York (cont) 
Photo Sound 
New York 
Programs Plus 
Brentwood 
Quartz Electronics 
fJew York 
Quo Vadis 
Ridgewood 
Show & Tell Video 
Bayshore 
Softwaire Center 
Forest Hills 
Software City 
Flushing, Brooklyn 
Staten Island Software 
Stalen Island 
Wall Street Camera 
New York 
Willoughby's 
New York 

North Carolina 

Games N' Gadgets 
Raleigh 

North Dakota 

Softv^re House 
Fargo 

Ohio 

B. Dalton Software Etc 

Columbus 

Big Bytes Computers 

Poland 

Computer Renaissance 

Columbus 

Disk Drive 

Toledo 

Games "N' Gadgets 

Nortb Randall 

Magic One Computer 
Barberion 

Soffrare And More 

Cincinnati 

Softrare Center International 

North Olmstead 

Oklahoma 
Wizard Electronics 
Oklahoma City 

Oregon 

Egghead Software 
Beaverton 
Link Three, Inc, 
Beaverton 
Software Galeria 
Beaverton 

Pennsylvania 

B, Dalton Software Etc. 

Monroevilte 

Bamberger's 

King Of Prussia, Whitehall 

Electronic Boutique 

Extrjn, Langhorne, 

Whi'ehall, King Of Prussia 

Games N' Gadgets 
West Mifflin, Media, King 
Of Prussia, Philadelphia, 
Lancaster 



Rhode Island 

Future Images 
Woonsocket 

South Carolina 

Horiron Commodore 

Superstore 

Greenville 

Tennessee 

Games 'N' Gadgets 
Memphis 
Software Store 
Memphis 



Tennessee (cont) 
The Computer Shope 
Knoxville, f,1emphis, 
Madison, Chattanooga, 
Nashville 

Texas 

B, Dalton 
Houston 

Babbage's 

Hurst, Mesquite, Fort 

Worth, Irving, Piano, 

Dallas, Houston 

Casa Computer 

Lubbock 

Compurite 

Houston 

The Computer Store 

San Angelo 

Data-Pro Computer Center 

Witchita Falls 

EduTron 

Ft. Worth 

Floppy Wizard 

Houston 

Gray, Welsh, Gray Business 

Computers 

Houston 

Software & Things 
Austin 

Software Galeria 
San Antonio 
Soltware Store 
San Anionio 
Videoland 
All Locatit)ns 

Utah 

Softwaire Center 
Salt Lake City 
Software Hut 
Salt Lake City 

Stokes Brothers 
Salt Lake City 

Virginia 

Crown Book & Soltware 
Springfield, Reston, 
Alexandna, McLean, 
Manassas, Falls Church, 
Woodbridge, Fairfax. Vienna 
Games V Gadgets 
Virginia Beach, Hampton 
Program Store 
Falls Church 
Software Central 
Norfolk 

Vermont 

PC Warehouse 
Winooski 

Washington 

Egghead Software 
Bellevue. Tukwila 

Nibbles & Bites 

Tacoma 

University Bookstore 

Seattle 

Wisconsin 

Computer Software Center 
Milwaukee 

Canada 

Compusoftware 
Vancouver. 6C 



r^tc Nol ail ^inuls ^BjlaMe 
Jt all localiDus 




iVIINDSCAPE 



If no dealer in your area, phone 1-800-221-9884 for information. (Illinois - 1-800-942-7315} 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 28 



How much is that doggie in the window? 
Did Noah own an umbrella? Is that check 
really in the mail? 

Find out by asking Racter'' 
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Racter gives your computer a 
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Racteranswers all your ques- 
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He'll do the same foryourfriends. And yourpets. 
What's more, Racter has been half- 
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Don'tforgetto buckle up. 




Racter is available for Apple" // Series, Macintosh? 
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CIRCLE READER SERVICE 28 






'o 



o ^ 
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op a 

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- '»o'£ 

"2 -"^ 

CD rj.v- ti 
O £ ^ ni 

® S 5"c 

Q) — £^ 



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(O n: ™ ^ 

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CIRCLE READER SERVICE 28 



LETTERS 

DOES THE PCf'r HAVE A 
FUTURE? 

] recenth' renewed our subscription 
to your magazine as I have found no 
other computer magazine as read- 
able, useable, and enjoyable. 

I was very pleased to see your fea- 
ture on the IBM PCjr. We are owners 
of the jr and were surprised and cha- 
grined when IBM decided to discon- 
tinue it. I was concerned that soft- 
ware for this computer would come 
to a screeching halt, thus leaving us 
(and many others) in the lurch. We 
had hoped this system would grow 
with our 12-year-old daughter. 

MONDE M/VmOLI 

Corvallis. Oregon 

EDITOR'S NOTE; Although IBM chose 
to discontinue the IBM PCjr, we 
have been pleased to see the PCjr 
software pool still increasing. New 
packages designed Jor the home 
market are in many cases compati- 
ble with both the PC and the jr. 
Check out our software reviews in 
What's In Store to help you keep 
your system growing apace with 
your daughter. 

WASTED TIME AND ENERGY? 

I enjoy your magazine very much. 
When you published Com-Grajix in 
the March issue, I felt as though 1 
had tN^cd in all this data just to do 
the Hi-Res Hat program. If you can 
print a Hi-Res program every month 
for the Com-Gra_ftx. then people who 
tv^ed in the program will know all 
that time and energy didn't go to 

waste , T HOMAS ANG ELLI 

Kearny. New Jersey 

EDITORS NOTE; We are glad to hear 
you enjoyed Com-Grafix so much. 
As we explained in the introduc- 
tion, it ivas designed as a program- 
mer's ulility to aid you in adding 
hi-res graphics into your own pro- 
grams. We would love to see any 
reader-written programs that make 
use oj the Com-Graflx utility Jor pos- 
sible publication in the magaz.ine. 
If you've tried your hand at design- 
ing such a program, send it to: The 
Programmer. FAiMiLY computing, 730 
Broadway. New York. NY 10003. 

MISTAKEN ADVENTURE 

I have been reading your magazine 
for about a year and a half and have 
enjoyed it immensely. My favorite 
section is the Games column. When- 
ever I receive your magazine, 1 read 
that section first. At about the same 
time 1 subscribed to your magazine. 
I purchased Telengard by Avalon 
Hill. In your September issue, you 



credited SSI with creating Telen- 
gard. Have they also marketed a pro- 
gram by the same name? 

CHR!STIA.^J D. WKIGHT. 13 

Camden. Delaware 

EDITORS NOTE: Telengard is indeed 
an Avalon Hill Microcomputer 
Games product. It was incorrectly 
credited to SSL Thank youjor 
bringing this to our attention. 

GREAT ERROR-FREE 
PROGRAMS 

Your magazine (k-powek especially) 
has the least mistakes so that vour 



programs usually run correctly "the 
first time" compared to some of the 
other magazines. Your mini k-pqwer 
section's Tune Generator did work 
the first time. 

Your Fathers Day Card was espe- 
cially important to me as our mar- 
ried daughter. Michelle, was here 
and I asked her to use this program 
for Father's Day. I was interested to 
find out just what her own ideas 
were about me. This helped in our 
communication. And Renegade Ro- 
bot was excellent value. Keep them 
coming! norman r. castro 

Bellevue. Nebraska 



Encyclopedia 
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The electronic encyclopedia that costs 
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Subscribe Today — GO AAE on CompuServe. 
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*The WTiiz Quiz Trademark of Grolier Electronic Publishing. Inc. 
CIRCLE READER SERVICE 21 





HOME/MONEY MANAGEMENT 

COMPUTERIZE YOUR FAAAIirS MEDICAL HISTORY 
Turn Recordkeeping into a Painless Process with a 
Spreadsheet or Data Base 



BY ROBIN RASKIN 

When was the last time you had a 
tetanus shot? Has your 9-year-old 
ever had the measles? When did the 
family dog have his last rabies shot? 

The answers to these questions 
may not seem important now. but 
they will be when you least expect it. 
say il' you step on a rusty nail, or if a 
measles epidemic breaks out in your 
sons school. Perhaps it will be the 
day the dog takes a nip out of the 
next-door neighbor during a "friend- 
ly" game of calch with the Frisbec. 

As most family physicians will tell 
you, a thorough medical histor\' can 
go a long way toward helping you 
keep track of and prevent illness — 
and that's nothing to sneeze at. 

A COMPUTERIZED SOLUTION 

Unless you're a statistician, you 
probably don"! remember all the de- 
tails of your own medical history, 
much less other family members' 
waking momenls. 1 know I don't. So 
1 finally decided to rely on the com- 
puter's memory instead of my own. 
You may want to do the same thing. 

"Vbu'll probably find, as I did. that 
a computerized recordkeeping sys- 
tem will be more complete and easier 
to manage than a handwritten one. 
Your first step will be to decide what 
l\TDc of software to use. Don't be 
misled into thinking you must pur- 
chase the "Rolls-Royce" of software 
to set up your medical records. Al- 
most any data base or spreadsheet 
will suffice. If you don't already own 
a data-management program, ask to 
have several demonstrated before 
you buy. If you intend to use the 
software for other applications, par- 
ticularly business, you might want 
to inquire about the new integrated 
packages that combine spreadsheet 
and data base features. 

More important, consider what ca- 
pabilities you want from your sys- 
tem. Arc graphics important? Do 
you want lo be able to do simple 
arithmetic? Will you need to retrieve 
your information based on many dif- 



KOBLN' Rj\SKiN, a Contributing editor to 
KAMrLV<.:oMPCTiNG. wmte this month's 
Telecomputing column. 




fcrcnt criteria or just a few? What 
else will you use the program for 
(family budget, coin collecting, etc.]? 
Each package has its own strengths 
and weaknesses. 

Spreadsheets are general-purpose 
organizers often used with business 
applications In mind. When you 
work with the spreadsheet as a data 
base, it is helpful to think of each 
row as a record, and the columns as 
fields. 

Data bases make you define re- 
cords more strictly, but are better 



when there's a lot of nonnumerical 
data to be stored. They can do some 
fancy retrievals. You're also less like- 
ly to make an entry error, because 
you often specify the kind of info 
you're putting into a field (numerical 
vs. alphabetical). Spreadsheets, on 
the other hand, will accept any data 
you type in a row or column. 

DESIGNING YOUR SYSTEM 

Put some serious thought into the 
design and organization of your sys- 
tem. Accessing your data can only be 



DATE 



FWILT WW. inmJNIZ. 



»/U/S1 KARI 
1S/«/«1 ML I 



ILLNESS 
SNUfLES 



KIbS' HEDKAL. RECORDS 

PBESCE. OFFICE CMI PRESCH. COST INSUBANCEI 



it 



GA55T 
BRUISE/EX 



EARACHE 
RASH 



EBT7HHGHTCIN 
CALAHINE 



«.7S 
(8.85 






VERT SDDE AAH 
APPLESAUCE 

LOW TEJ4P 

HA/TOGURT 

SUHACi 



Part of my medical records data base [produced en lefus I-3-3), 



10 MMILY COMPUTING 



MAKE 1HE RIGHT CONNECTIOIIS 
WriH A TANDY^ PRINTER 



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TP-10 



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OUR LOWEST-PRICED 
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See the complete selection of print- 
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® 



The Technology Store 



A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 



r 



New 1986 Computer Catalog! 
Send me a Copy. 

Mail To: Hadio Shack, Dept. 86-A-496 
300 One Tandy Center, Ft. Worth, TX 76102 



Cily 



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Tel&ptionQ _ 



Prices apply at Radio Stiack Computer Cers- 
ters and paricipaling stores and dealers. 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 35 



ANNOUNCING THE 
FAMILY SOFTWARE SPECTACULAR: 



BUY3,GET1FREE. 



CHOOSE FROM 
OVER 50 LEADING TITLES. 

What do you call an offer that brings together, for the 
first time ever, five leading brands of home software ? 

The Family Software Spectacular! 

And it's your opportunity to choose a free software pro- 
gram from the best titles on the market today AU you have to 
do is buy any combination of three titles from any participat- 
ing brands during this special offer period. And we'll send 
you another one of your choice -/ree/ 

It's a one-of-a-kind value your family shouldn't miss. 

fisher-price: 
a name you can trust. 

For years Fisher-Price has been known for helping chil- 
dren develop skills as they play With Fisher-Price™ Learning 
Software, your child can develop skills in five key areas: math, 
language, creativity, basic learning and computer literacy. 

Your child will love developing and testing language 
skills with the help of PETER RABBIT READING,a pro- 
gram that uses voice to teach sound and letter recognition 
in words. 



WINDHAM classics: CLASSIC 
NOVELS COME TO LIFE. 

Pick up Windham Classics, graphic interac- 
tive fiction based on some of the greatest adventures 
of all time. 



They're great for kids , yet fim for all ages. 

Enjoy "THE WIZARD OF OZ." " You are Dorothy, 
and each of your decmons determines your adventure. 
There's more than one adventure to be had as you meet old 
friends and new in the land of Oz. 

WORK BETTER WITH 
BETTER WORKJNGr 

Constandy erasing and retj'ping? Unsure of your spell- 
ing? WORD PROCESSOR WITH SPELLCHECKERis 
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The fiill line also includes 
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that represent the best 
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SPINNAKERf THE LEADER IN 
FAMILY LEARNING SOFTWARE. 

From pre-school counting to high-school compositions, 
Spinnaker offers the high quality educational programs 
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kids tackle otherwise troublesome school assignments. 

telarium: 
interactive fiction at its best 

Here's graphic interactive fiction by famous writers of 
science fiction, fantasy, and mystery like Ray Bradbury, Arthur 



C. Clarke and Erie Stanley Gardner. Each story unfolds with 
you in the center of the acdon - and completely in control . In 
PERRY MASON: THE CASE OF THE MANDARIN 
MURDER ™ you are the world famous criminal lawyer. Chal- 
lenge the evidence. Cross-examine the wimess. Only you 
can prove your client's innocence. And time is running out. 

A SOFTWARE OFFER FOR ALL AGES. 

Any software offer including something for everyone in 
the family is certainly fantastic. But combine that widi a free 
product offer and what you have is something spectacular. 
Look for the specially marked boxes of The Family Software 
Spectacular at your retailer. 



ffhefftmuly^S^ftwttre^SpecUicultir 




TURN PAGE FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE FAMILY 
SOFTWARE SPECTACULAR. 

1 1985 SSC.Onc Kendall SquarcCambridgc, MA 02 139. All righls rwoiTl. Tiite availabfconmosi popular honKCnnipuim. Spelling Soft- 
wareilcvL-lonulbyH(iugh(i)nMifllLiiOjmpiuiv,publishi;n.ofth(:/intricuit/ta(tig(Wiclcmarv. 

THK I'AMILY SOl'TW'ARH SPECTACULAR is a liademarkof Spinnaker SoftwarcCoip. SI'lNNAKhR iv » rcsiMtrcd iraderaarkof 
Spinnaker Software (iinj- FISHER-PRICE is a tradenurk of The Quaker UaLs Company and li used iindcr licence- WIN DHA.W LLAiyCS IS 
a trademark of Windham Classics Coip.TELAKJU-M isa (radonark of Telariiiin Corp. BEITER WORKING is a uademark of Spinnaker 
Softv^BreCorp. ^^^^^^ ^^^^^(^ 42 



[SEE PREVIOUS PAGE] 

HERE'S HOW YOUR 

FAMILY CAN 

PARTICIPATE IN 

REMEMBER, TO RECEIVE A FREE 
PRODUCT YOU MUST PURCHASE 
ANY THREE TITLES FROM THE PAR- 
TICIPATING BRANDS (IN ANY COMBI- 
NATION) AND MAIL\OUR ENTRY NO 
LATER THAN JANUARY 31, 1987. 

1 . Stan by saving the receipt(s) from your soft- 
ware program purchases. (It is not necessary 
for software purchases to appear on one 
receipt. Photocopies of the receipt(s) are ac- 
cepted. Receipts must be dated BETWEEN 
JULY 1, 1985, AND JANUARY 3t, 1987.) 

2. Cut the proof-of-purchase tab from each of 
the three user manuals that come with the 
programs. (Photocopies not accepted.) 

3. Attach the purchase reecipt(s) and the three 
original proof-of-purchase tabs to one sepa- 
rate sheet of paper. 

4. Fill in the form below and place the com- 
pleted form in an envelope with: 

a. A sheet of paper with three original 
proof-of-purchase tabs and your 
purchase reccipl(s) 

b. A check or money order for $3 . 50 10 
cover postage and handling. (Canada 
residents please send $5 . 00 for postage 
and handling.) 

Make check payable to THE FAMILY 

SOFTWARE SPECTACULAR and mail 

envelope to: 

THE FAMILY SOFTWARE 

SPECTACULAR 

P.O. Box 1327,Cambridge,MA 02238 

ORDER FORM 

To receive your free program, this form must be 
filled out completely. Please print. 

Free Product Chosen; 

Title/Brand 

Computer Model 

,M.AKE SLRE I HI; PRODUCT YOU CHOOSE IS 
AVAIL.^EI.i- ON THE CO.MPL'TER SYSTEM 
VOU HAVE SELECTED. 

Name 

Phone ( ) 

Address 

Ciiy 



.State. 



.Zip. 



TITLES PURCHASED 
I 

2 

3 

BRANDS DATE OF PURCHASE 

1 

2 



3. 



Allow 6-S weeks for delivtiy of your free softvfarc program. 
Kole: All recti pis and envelope posimark musi he daled 
prior 10 January 3) , 1987. Offer good in ihc US and Canada 
only. Void where laxcd, resiricicd or prohihiicd bylaw. 



HOME/MONEY MANAGEMENT 



as useful as its preliminary orga- 
nization. Ask yourself what sort of 
information you want to retrieve and 
create categories for it. 

Using the spreadsheet in the Inte- 
grated package Lotus 1-2-3, 1 set up 
the following categories: date (day/ 
month/year), family member, immuni- 
zation. ILLNESS. PRESCRIPTION, OFFICE 
VISIT COST, PRESCRIPTION COST. PER- 
CENTAGE PAID I3Y INSURANCE, and COM- 

MENT. Not every record will have all 
these items filled in. [You might 
want to add other categories, such 

as LENGTH OF HOSPITAL STAY. NAME OF 
DOCTOR. NAME OF HOSPITAL, etc.) 

For example, one record might 
slate that my daughter Karl had a 
DPT (diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus) 
immunization on 15/4/81. It cost S25 
and 50 percent was reimbursed by 
the insurance company. You might 
also use the comment field to note 
that she had a mild reaction and ran 
a low-grade temperature. 

A page of entries may be easily 
scanned, allowing quick access to 
information {see previous page). 

I didn't limit my recordkeeping to 
basic information; I tossed in my 
children's developmental milestones 
such as TOOK FIRST STER I cvcu in- 
cluded the family dog's veterinary re- 
cords- This may seem like overkill, 
but it's easier to delete categories or 
fields from your data base than to 
add them later. 

Once you've established your for- 
mat, lake another look to make sure 
you haven't omitted anything. If 1 
learned anything in setting up a 
data base it was to overcategorize. If 
you have a name as a piece of data, 
enter it twice as FIRST name and last 
NAME. If you combine both in one 
listing under name, you won't be able 
to alphabetize your list according to 
last name. 

Be on guard against other poten- 
tial problems. The ftrst time i orga- 
nized our records, I couldn't figure 
out how to sort by date. Since I re- 
covered various slips of paper from 
my drawers, not much of it was in 
chronological order. 1 tried sorting 
my dates as numbers, but that 
didn't work at all. 

After a consultation with my com- 
puter-sawy husband. I returned to 
the data base and tried sorting them 
alphabetically. It worked, because 
luckily I had filled out my dates with 
zeros and put them in day/month/ 
YEAR format. 

If your data base design is the 
"brains" of the operation, then the 
data itself is certainly the "brawn." 
There's not much comfort I can of- 



fer, except the sooner you get start- 
ed, the better off you'll be. 

SEARCHING FOR RECORDS 

Once you've tvpcd in and saved 
your data, you'll be able to use your 
family's medical historj' as a re- 
source guide. With a spreadsheet. 
you'll be able to scan a good portion 
of your records at once. However, 
with many of the traditional data 
bases, only one medical record will 
appear at a time. 

If 1 wanted to check when Arli, an- 
other daughter, had her most recent 
bout with bronchitis, 1 would more 
than likely go directly into my 
spreadsheet and glance through the 
ILLNESS column until 1 spotted the 
last bronchitis entry. 

Of course, there are times when 
data entry will be more complicated. 
For example, I've totaled the costs in 
the OFFICE VISIT column to determine 
our annual medical expenses. (Un- 
less your data base does math, cal- 
culations like this are easier if you're 
using a spreadsheet.) I've also select- 
ed columns to print so I can come 
up with printed lists of each kid's 
immunizations or illnesses without 
having to print out the entire medi- 
cal history. And I can ask the data 
base (if I ever need to) to give me a 
list of the children who've had 
mumps and measles, but not chick- 
en pox. (Be aware that not all 
spreadsheets have a search function, 
or, if they do. they may not be as ex- 
tensive as Lotus J-2-3's,) 

I can even search for phrases like 
FIRST TOOTH in the comment column 
rather than read through all my re- 
marks. Searches, however, call for 
rigid matches. For example, if you 
used the word teeth instead of 
tooth to query the computer, it 
wouldn't be able to retrieve your in- 
formation. 

We've been fortunate. Neither our 
children nor our dog has used much 
memory in our medical data base. Of 
course, there was the time Sam, our 
dog, developed hematomas on his 
cars after a fight, and the kids have 
certainly had their share of bronchi- 
al and ear infections. Overall, their 
illnesses have been routine. But it's 
still nice to know that the informa- 
tion is readily available for the family 
doctor, school nurse, or camp direc- 
tor if need be, and that once the in- 
formation is stored, it's there for life. 

At year's end, you and your family 
can sit back, scan your medical re- 
cords, and, hopefully, count your 
blessings instead of your medical 
bills. H 



SYLVIA PORTER'S 
PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNER 

DOES MORE THAN 
MANAGE YOUR MONEY 

n PLANS YOUR FINANOAL FUIURE TOO 

Sylvia Porter, and the editors of Sylvia Porter's Personal Finance Magazine, now combine with all the computer tools 
you'll ever need to help manage your money on a day-to-day basis and plan your financial future, too. In Sylvia Porter's 

style, without complicated financial jargon or "computerese". 



Volume 1 

Your Personal Financial Planner 

Helps you track your day-to- 
day financial data, then com- 
bines this information with your 
future financial objectives to 
produce the most comprehen- 
sive and easily-understood finan- 
cial planning program available. 

For Your Day-to -Day 
Affairs: 

• Maintains your electronic check- 
book and credit card system. 

• Writes your checks and balances 
your checkbook. (We even built in a 
calculator and memo pad for you 

• Prepares and monitors your budget. 

• Classifies and tracks your taxable 
income and expenses. 

• Calculates your net worth and gener- 
ates customized personal financial 
statements. 

• Tracks your financial assets - and your 
insurance policies. 

• Graphically generates supplemental data, 
such as percentages, ratios and charts. 

• You get our Toll-Free Hotline and our Cus- 
tomer Technical Support Team at no charge. 

• You get Timeworks' Money Back Guarantee 
(Details in each package,) 




For Your Financial Future: 

• You'll be led step-by-step through a 
series of questions regarding your life 
and lifestyle, your financial goals, and 
your current financial condition. Your 
answers will enable a computer 
to determine and print a summary 
of the amounts you must save each 
year to meet your financial 
objectives - in both real and inflated 
dollars, 
• Helps you plan for protection 
against major medical adversities 
and other financial setbacks. 
Each program interfaces with 
others in this series. Your 
information can be 
incorporated into letters and 
reports produced by 
Timeworks' Word Writer. 
• Everything is integrated. You 
need to enter data only 
once. 

Available for Apple, IBM 
and Commodore computers. 

Moderately Priced - from your 
favorite Dealer or contact 
Timeworks for (he Dealer closest to you. 




Next in this integrated series: 

Your Personal Investment Manager. 

Other Timeworks Programs: The Evelyn Wood 
Dynamic Reader ■ Word Writer with Spell 
Checker Data Manager 2 • SwiftCalc with 
Sideways ■ Business Systems ■ Swiftax 
Cave of the V\ford Wizard ■ Wall Street 



More power for your dollar. 

Tlf(^EWORKS, INC., 444 Lake Cook Rd., Deerfield, IL 60015, 312-948-9200 

c 1984 Sylvia Portar's Personal Firance Magazine Co. i flmewottis. Inc. All nghls reserved- 
CIRCLE READER SERVICE 47 



TELECOMPUTING 

SHOPPING IN ELECTRONIC STORES 



Sick of Crowds? Ti 
Want to Compare 

BY ROBIN RASKIN 

Online shopping lets your fingers do 
the walking— at the computer key- 
board instead of in the Yellow Pages. 
Stereos, best-selling books, vaca- 
tions, gourmet chocolates, appli- 
ances, drugs and cosmetics, even 
satellite dishes can be investigated 
and ordered using your personal 
computer. 

For those with little patience for 
salespeople, miles of aisles, and a 
commute to the local store, shop- 
ping via computer is a blessing. For 
others, it's an expensive gimmick, 
partly because you can't view the 
goods before purchasing, and partly 
because of the intricacies and costs 
of using online services, 

SHOPPING GEAR 

Online shopping ser\'iccs are gen- 
erally accessible through informa- 
tion networks, though some can be 
accessed directly. You need a com- 
puter, a modem, telecommunica- 
tions software, and membership 
with a shopping or information ser- 
vice (see listings}. 

Twenty-four hours a day, seven 
days a week, these "electronic 
stores" display their inventory of 
goods. You can browse and buy 
through a series of choices from 
simple menus. 

"It's a cheaper and a more conve- 
nient way to shop for me," says Alli- 
son Davis, a writer/producer on 
NBC's "Today" show. "I'm a catalog 
shopper anway: 1 don't like stores 
much." she says, adding, "The com- 
puter has taken away all the worry." 

Davis, who also banks by comput- 
er, says she sits down once a month 
to do that and her shopping. She 
bought her mother a VCR last 
Christmas that way, sent gifts to 
friends and relatives, and saved S40 
on a television for her father-in-law. 

James West, a 26-year-old engi- 
neer from Stamford. Connecticut, is 
another online shopping fan. "I love 
il," he says. "I've bought software, 
tools, and researched television 
prices online. 1 compare prices with 
local discount stores." 

Contributing editor EiODiN haskin's last 
article was "Upgrading" in tl\e June 

1985 FAMILY COMPUTING. 



ed Up at Work? 

Prices? Go Online and Browse. 




West says he only regrets not be- 
ing able to view or gel ver\' detailed 
product specifications of the item of- 
fered online. Davis, who recently 
moved into a new house, adds that 
she is scared to buy silver^varc on- 
line because she's not sure how it 
will look in her dining room. 

TECHNIQUES 

Online shopping recjuires the cul- 
tivation of new skills — much the 
same as those used for searching 
through any large data base. You 
proceed through screen menus to 
find a specilic store or item — to re- 
turn to the same spot at a later visit, 
you'll need to remember where it 
was in the menu system. It's initially 
as confusing as a visit to a large de- 
partment store, but electronic shop- 
ping gets easier once you learn the 
floor plan. 

Typically, after logging onto the 
system, you see a main menu that 
lists goods by product category or re- 
tailer. In either case, you can browse 
through the selections. For instance, 
the main menu on Comp-u-storc 
On-Line, which you can access 
through various information ser- 
vices, lets vou choose from such cat- 



egories as appliances, cameras and 
accessories, sporting goods, etc. At 
that point you can comparison shop 
among name brands. 

Other services (such as Compu- 
Scn'e's Electronic Mali) list individ- 
ual retailers, such as Waldcnbooks 
or Record World, and their offerings. 
To place an order, you select an item 
and then complete an online order 
form detailing payment (usually 
credit card, sometimes check) and 
shipping information. 

CONSUMER EDUCATION 

Online shopping can provide a 
good education in consumer goods. 
Using Comp-u-store, I got a sense of 
the price spectrum for new ovens 
much more easily than I could have 
by studying newspapers. I also 
learned about the benefits and dis- 
advantages of convection ovens on 
Comp-u-storc 's hotline, an online 
consumer report that looks at specif- 
ic products. 

Probably the main advantage of 
online shopping is the ability to re- 
search a product category you're in- 
Icrested in. As with any large data 
base, you can access the product in- 
formation you want when vou need 



16 F.'VHILY COMPm-lNG 



The Souice^Is Illuminating. 




At last, a beacon to help you navigate 
the vast sea of personal computer technology. 

It's The Source. The online information 
service that can guide you to the best deals in 
the PC market. Shed light on your software 
problems. And signal the latest developments 
in micros. 

With The Source, you can buy, sell or 
swap hardware and software. Learn new 
applications from a Special Interest Group. 
See what's been written about the printer 
you're planning to buy. Or send out 
an SOS to thousands of other PC 
users when you need advice. 

What's more, The 
Source can enlighten you ,' 
with current information J 
on everything from business 
to travel, investments to 
world news. 



Whatever kind of help you're after, you 
can find it faster on The Source. With a 
system of easy commands and menus. Plus a 
tutorial— free of online charges— that'll bring 
you up to speed in a snap. 

To sign up today, call 1-800-336-3366. 
For more information, mail this coupon, or 
visit your nearest dealer. 

Then, no matter how many waves of new 
technology rock your boat, you'll stay right 
on course. 




IXrORMMH^MTUORK 




SM 



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Show me the lighi. 

Please send more information about Tlie Source. 

Name 

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The Siiurcc is H service mark of Sourct; Telecojiipulini; 
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Inc. c 1985 Source TeJeconlpuling Corponilion. 



B \ V"^ y Mail to: Source TelecomputingjCorpoi^ation, 



EO. Box 1305, McLean. VA 22102. In Virginia, 
or outside the U.S., caU |703) 821-6666. 




t» 




Some Historic Breakthroughs 
DoNT Take As Much Explaining 

As CompuServe. 




But then, some historic 
breakthroughs could only 
take you from the cave to 
the tar pits and back again. 

CompuServe, on the other hand, 
makes a considerably more civilized 
contribution to your life. 

it turns that marvel of the 20th 
century, the personal computer, into 
something useful. 

Unlike most personal 
computer products you 
read about, CompuServe 
is an information service. 
It isn't software. It isn't 
hardware. And you don't even have 
to know a thing about programming 
to use it . You subscribe to CompuServe 
— and 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 
it puts a universe of information, 
entertainment and communications 
right at your fingertips. 

A few of the hundreds 
of things you can do with 
CompuServe. 

COMMUNICATE 

EasyPlex'" Electronic Mail lets even 
beginners compose, edit, send and 
file messages ttie first time they get 
online, ft puts friends, relatives and 




business associates — anywhere in 
the country — in constant, conven- 
ient touch. 
CB Simulator features 

72 channels for "talking" 

with thousands of other 

enthusiastic subscribers 

throughout the country 4* 

and Canada. The chatter 

is frequently hilarious, the "handles" 

unforgettable, and the friendships 

hard and fast. 

More than 100 Forums welcome 
\S) your participation in "discussions" 
'^ on all sorts of topics. There are 
Forums for computer ovmers, 
gourmet cooks, veterinarians, pilots, 
golfers, musicians, you name it! Also, 
Electronic Conferencing lets busi- 
nesses put heads together without 
anyone having to leave the shop. 

Bulletin Boards let you "post" 
messages where thousands will see 
them. You can use our National 
Bulletin Board or the specialized 
Bulletin Boards found in just about 
every Forum. 

HAVE FUN 

Our full range of games includes 
"You Guessed It!", the first online 
TV-style game show you play for real 
prizes; and Mega Wars III, offering the 



^ 



ultimate in interactive excitement. 
And there are board, parlor, sports 
and educational games to play alone 

or against other subscribers 

throughout the country 

Movie Reviews keep that big 
night at the movies from being a 
five star mistake. 

SHOP 

THE ELECTRONIC MALE" gives 
you convenient, 24-hour-a-day 
7-day-a-week shopping for name 
brand goods and services at discount 
prices from nationally known stores 
and businesses. 

SAVE ON TRIPS 

Travelshopper ^" 

lets you scan flight 
availabilities (on 
virtually any 

airline — world- 
wide), find airfare 
bargains and order 
tickets right on your computer. 

Worldwide Exchange sets you up 

with the perfect yacht, condo, villa, 
or whatever it takes to make your next 
vacaliona vacation. 

A to Z Travel/News Service 

provides the latest travel news plus 
complete information on over 20,000 
hotels worldwide. 





MAKE PHI BETA KAPPA 

Grolier's Academic American 
Encyclopedia's Electronic Edition 

delivers a complete set of encyclope- 
dias right to your living 
room just in time for 
today's homework, it's 
continuously updated . . . 
and doesn't take an inch 
of extra shelf space. 
The College Board, operated by the 
College Entrance Examination 
Board, gives tips on preparing for the 
SAT, choosing a college and getting 
financial aid. 

KEEP HEALTHY 

Healthnet will never replace a real, 
live doctor — but it is an excellent and 
readily available source of health and 
medical information for the public. 
Htunan Sexuality gives the civiliza- 
tion that put a man on the moon an 
intelligent alternative to the daily 
"Advice to the Lovelorn" columns. 
Hundreds turn to it for real answers. 

BE INFORMED 

All the latest news is at your 
fingertips. Sources include the AP 
news wire (covering all 50 states plus 
national news), the 
Washington Post, 
USA TODAY Update, 
specialized business 
and trade publica- 
tions and more. You 
can find out instantly what Congress 
did yesterday; who finally won the 
game; and what's happening back in 
Oskaloosa with the touch of a button. 
And our electronic clipping service 
lets you tell us what to watch for We'll 
electronically find, clip and file news 
for you. . . to read whenever you'd like. 

INVEST WISELY 

Comprehensive investment help 

just might tell you more about the 
stock you're looking at 
than the company's 
Chairman of the Board 
knows. (Don't know who 
he is? Chances are, we 
can fill you in on that, 
too.) CompuServe gives you com- 
plete statistics on over 10,000 NYSE, 
AMEX and OTC securities. Historic 
trading statistics on over 50,000 




stocks, bonds, funds, issues and 
options. Five years of daily com- 
modity quotes. Standard & Poor's. 
Value Line. And more than a dozen 
other investment tools. 

Site II facilitates business 
decisions by providing you 
with demographic and sales 
potential information by state, 
county and zip code for the 
entire country 
National and Cfuiadian business 
wires provide continuously updated 
news and press releases on hundreds 
of companies worldwide. 

GET SPECIALIZED 
INFORMATION 

Pilots get personalized flight plans, 
weather briefings, weather and radar 
maps, newsletters, etc. 
Entrepreneurs use CompuServe 
too for complete step-by-step guide- 
lines on how to incorporate the IBMs 
of tomorrow. 

Lawyers, doctors, engineers, mil- 
itary veterans and businessmen 
of all types use similar specialized 
CompuServe resources pertinent to 
their unique needs. 




And now for the 
pleasant surprise. 

Although CompuServe makes the 
most of any computer, it's a remark- 
able value. With CompuServe, you 
get low start-up costs, low usage 
charges and local phone-call access 
in most major metropolitan areas. 

Here's exactly how 
to use CompuServe. 

First, relax. 

There are no advanced computer 
skills required. 

In fact, if you know 
how to buy breakfast, 
you already have the 
know-how you'll need 
to access any subject 

in our system. That's because it's 
"menu-driven," so beginners can 
simply read the menus (lists of 
options) that appear on their 
screens and then type in their 
selections. 
Experts can skip the menus and 
just type in "GO" followed by the 
abbreviation for whatever topic 
they're after. 




In case you ever get lost or con- 
fused, just type in "H" for help, and 
we'll immediately cut in with instruc- 
tions that should save the day 

Besides, you can either ask ques- 
tions online through our Feedback 
service or phone our Customer 
Service Department. 

How to subscribe. 

To access CompuServe, you'll 
need a CompuServe Subscription 
Kit, a computer, a modem to connect 
your computer to your phone, and 
in some cases, easy-to-use com- 
munications software. (Check the 
information that 
comes with your 
modem.) 

With your Sub- 
scription Kit, you'll 
receive: 

■ a $25 usage credit. 

■ a complete hardcover Users Guide. 

■ your own exclusive user ID 
number and preliminary password. 

■ a subscription to CompuServe's 
monthly magazine, Online Today. 

Call 800-848-8199 (in Ohio, 
614-457-0802) to order your Sub- 
scription Kit or to receive more 
information. Or mail this coupon. 

Kits are also available in computer 
stores, electronic equipment outlets 
and household catalogs. You can also 
subscribe with materials you'll find 
packed right in with many com- 
puters and modems sold today 



□ Please send me additional information. ' 

C] Please send me a CompuServe Subscription KiL 
D 1 am enclosing my check (or $39.95. plus S2,50 
handling. (Addsales lax if deliuered in Ohio.) 

Please make check payable to CompuServe 
Inlormation Services, Inc. 

n Charge this to my VISA/MaslerCard 




Expiration Date . 

Signature 

Name 



Address- 

City 



Stale. 



. Zip- 



MAIL TO: 



CompuServe' 

Customer Service Ordering Dept. 
RO. Box L^77 
Columbus, Otlio 43260 



PRl-911 



J 



An H&R BJock Coopary 

EasyPlex and ELECTRONC MAU. amttattemarksol CcmpuServe. 

Ificorpofaied Travelshopper is a service mark of TWA 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 8 



TELECOMPUTING 



it. For instance, you can check 
prices on new cars, or ask for a llst- 
ini^ of all 19-inch color televisions 
with remote control and stereo 
broadcast capabilities that sell for 
less than S500. That's information 
you couldn't get by walking into 
most stores. 

In some cases, you can even leave 
electronic mail for store or product 
representatives and ask for more de- 
tails. 

GOOD DISCOUNT PRICES 

Another advantage of online shop- 
piiiff is low prices. Manufacturers 
have no advertising costs, sales 
staffs to pay, or storefront rent. Elec- 
tronic "stores" don't need to stock 



invcntor3\ since the products are 
usually available directly from the 
manufacturer. All this can translate 
into lower costs for customers. 

The online shopping services 
boast anTO'here from 25 to 60 per- 
cent savings over conventional retail- 
ers. 1 found the online prices similar 
to those in most mail-order catalogs 
and discount houses, but occasion- 
ally they were higher. However, even 
if you don't have time to bargain 
hunt around town, you can still be 
reasonably sure you're getting close 
to rock-bottom prices on most goods 
you buy electronically. 

Unfortunately, you can't judge the 
cost of online shopping by the price 
of the item alone. Depending on 



ONLINE SHOPPING SERVICES 



American Express" Advance, 

American Express Travel Related 
Services Co., Inc., Interactive Ser- 
vices. American Express Plaza. New 
York, NY 10004; (800) 327-2177, 

The sen'ice offers products from 
the American Express catalog and 
subscriptions to 150 popular maga- 
zines. 

Cost & Access: Available only to 
American Express cardholders. No 
fee for use. Access via CompuServe 
(address bclowl and Dow Jones/ News 
Retrieval (P.O, Box 300, Princeton, 
NJ 08540; IBOGj 257-5114: [6091 
452- 15 1 1 ). Payment by American 
Express card. 

Comp>u-store On<Line, 707 Sum- 
mer St.. Stamford, CT 06901: (8001 
843-7777, 

Founded in 1982 as a division of 
Comp-U-Card, the nation's largest 
electronic merchandising service. 
Comp-u-store has over 31.000 mem- 
bers who choose from 60.000 items 
listed by product category' or feature. 

Comp-u-mall, from the same com- 
pany, lists those goods by retailer, 
including Saks Fifth Avenue. Nei- 
man-Marcus, Hickory Farms, and 
Omaha Steaks. 

Cost & Access: S25 annual fee for 
purchasing members, but anyone 
vvlth a subscription to CompuServe, 
Dow Joncs/Ncws Retrieval or The 
Source can browse without buying. 
There is no membership fee for the 
first year through Dow Jones/News 
Retrieval. Direct access (without go- 
ing through an information service) 
costs S18 an hour weekdays, and S5 
an hour nights and weekends. Pay- 
ment by credit card or check. 

The Electronic Mali, Compu- 
Serve, 5000 Arlington Centre Blvd,, 



P.O. Box 20212. Columbus. OH 
43220: (614) 457-8650: (800) 848- 
8990. 

The Electronic Mall, a joint ven- 
ture of CompuServe and L.M. Berry, 
publisher of the Yellow Pages, lists 
about 80 merchants, including 
Sears Roebuck, Waldenbooks, and 
Record World. 

Cost & Access: No fee for service. 
Available through CompuServe, the 
start-up kit costs S39.95. Access 
charges arc 10-21 cents a minute 
nights and weekends for 300/1200 
baud, and 20-25 cents a minute 
primetime for 300/1200 baud. Pay- 
ment by credit card. 

OTHER NiTWORK 
OFFERINGS 

CompuServe (see address above). 

Includes Fifth Avenue Shopper 
(features goods from leading shops 
and boutiques): MicroShoppe (mi- 
crocomputer supplies and accesso- 
ries): New Car Showroom (new car 
prices): Prime Time Radio Classics 
(old radio programs on cassettes): 
Savings Scan (30 percent to 70 per- 
cent savings on selected items); and 
Travelshopper (offers information on 
airline routes and prices, and lets 
you buy tickets), 

Delphi. 3 Blackstone St., Cam- 
bridge. MA 02139; (617) 491-3393. 

Grapha Com On-line sells comput- 
er hardware, software, copiers, and 
office furniture at discount prices; 
Wine On-Line sells wine, books, and 
accessories. 

The Source. 1616 Anderson 
Road. McLean, VA 22102. (800) 336- 
3366; (703) 734-7500, 

Music Source seUs records and 
tapes from K-Tel. 



your communications skills and the 
speed of vour modem, "foraging" 
costs can add up. First, you need to 
subscribe to an information service 
(though it's probably not worth join- 
ing for the shopping feature alone) 
and sometimes you'll have to pay an 
additional membership fee. Then 
you pay "connect time" (i.e.. the 
time you spend online). 

Many people, depending on where 
they live, must also cither make 
long-distance calls or use a comput- 
er-communications network like Tele- 
net or Tymnet, which charge SIO 
an hour daytime. S2 an hour nights 
and weekends, to get online. 

If you shop at 300 baud, as I did. 
you can get frustrated waiting for 
the menus to unfold. You slow down 
further if you enter the wrong "shop- 
ping aisle" and then must backtrack 
to a previous menu. Searching for 
product information online can take 
hours, when often a phone call or a 
store visit would be cheaper, faster, 
and more productive. 

In a "real" store, browsing and or- 
dering don't cost anything. Online 
expenses are also likely to be higher 
than car or bus fares and parking. 

WORTH A THOUSAND 
WORDS 

Online shopping services are en- 
tirely text-based. They rely on words 
to describe products, which is not 
how most people are used to shop- 
ping. You dont see the products live 
or with photos. (Comp-u-store, how- 
ever, does send brochures to cus- 
tomers, much like a direct-mail 
house.) And when you shop for an 
item such as a television, you want 
to see what the picture looks like, 
not just read a measurement giving 
screen size. 

"Simply put, electronic shopping 
requires trust." says David Roth- 
man, author of Silicon Jungle (Bal- 
lantine Books, 1985). "And you can't 
trust characters on a green screen 
the way you can a human voice" or 
picture, he adds. 

Unless you're already familiar with 
a specific product or categorj', online 
shopping is a good way to do re- 
search — but not necessarily to buy. 
"I even thought about ordering a car 
online," says Davis, "but that was 
too much!" 

And when you do order the goods, 
there's no guarantee you'll get them 
quickly. In this sense, you have no 
electronic advantage over foot-weary 
mall-goers. Even though your order 
is theoretically placed with the man- 



20 I'AMILY COMPUTING 




We'll pay you fa take 
the most exciting classes anywhere. 



You'll leam electronics, avionics, aircraft 
maintenance, health care sciences, man- 
agement or logistics— the Air Force will 
train you in one of more than 200 technical 
specialties America needs today. 

You'll get hands-on experience with the 
latest equipment, and we'll pay 75% of your 
tuition for off-duty college courses, to get 
you even further. 



Whatever your goals, the Air Force will 
equip you with the skills to get where you 
want to be. 

If you're looking seriously into your 
future, Aim High to a future in the Air Force. 
Visit your Air Force recruiter today or call 

toU-freel-800-423-USAF 

(in California 
1-800-232-USAF). 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 49 



TELECOMPUTING 

ufacturer immediately, your pur- 
chase will arrive anywhere from one 
to four weeks later. The products I 
ordered took even lonj^er. So shop- 
ping in advance for special occasions 
is still necessary. 

Finally, you may encounter petty 
annoyances or feel you've been led 
astray. In CompuServe's Electronic 
Mall, for example, you can make a 
menu choice to "enter" Blooming- 
dale's, a potential treat if you don't 
live near an outlet. But, once there, 
all you can do is order a catalog. 

A COMPELLING WAY 
TO SHOP 

Despite all these drawbacks, shop- 
ping online is still compelling. Hours 



Ily by like minutes when 1 explore 
the many electronic stores. 

After I learned my way around and 
saw what was available, I saved 
money, time, and untold aggravation 
by shopping online. 1 also gained ac- 
cess to important price-comparison 
information. In an hour on Compu- 
Sen'c, I ordered a best-selling book, 
hard-to-find children's records, and 
some fancy croissants for my par- 
ents* anniversary'. This would have 
taken a full day using traditional 
shopping avenues. 

Computer shopping has started to 
catch on. but not as quickly as 
many thought li would. It's still in 
Its infancy as a valid consumer ser- 
vice. As modems transmit informa- 



tion faster, and videotex services be- 
gin to merge graphics with text. 
computer shopping will probably 
blossom. Until then, the shopping 
"pioneers" are forging (he way. '"1 



APPLE EXECUTIVE 
LIVE IN CONFERENCE 

Dave Cote, consumer marketing 
mariager at Apple, will be the guest at a 
Uve conference in the i'A.MrL\' computing 
Forum on Sunday. Nov. 24 to answer 
questions about Apple's NEWS products 
fsee "Buyer's Guide" in Lhls issuej. 

FAMILY computing's Foriun on 
CompuServe foo kam 20oJ is operated via 
modems supplied by Hayes Micro- 
computer Products. Inc. 

You can leave messages Jor kamfi.v 
coMi'iniNC. there or on The Source 
iri5483). 



HELP 



©si - 





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CIRCLE READER SERVICE S 




RAINDOM HOUSE 



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fKHXTOHEW 




PEANUTS' '83— New 
editions to the I'ennuts 
family: "Charlie Brown's 
1, 2, 5*s/' "Snoopy Writer,' 
"Math Matcher' k 
"Typing Is A Ball." 




MR. AND MRS. 
POTATO HEAD "—An 
animated computer 
version of the children's 
classic. 



/f^d^x.£Mai^Z^ 



GARFIELD'— New! 
"Eat Your Words" 
and "Double Dares," 
featuring everyone's 
favorite wise guy. 





||VM»CIM IKH-r 


•'■ 1 


Charlie 3 
Brouun's | 

ABI7S 


Ld 



PEANUTS'— The orig- 
inal Peanuts programs, 
including "Charlie 
Brown's A, B,C's," 
"Snoop v's Skywriter 
Scrambfcr" aiid more. 



ALPINE ENCOUNTERt 
— A spy thriller graph- 
ics and text adventure 
program to challenge 
the whole family. 



PATCHWORKS'— 
Design, editand print 
out dazzling patterns for 
quilts and otfier crea five 
projects. 

PATCHWORKS 



APBA MAJOR LEAGUE 
PLAYERS BASEBALL— 
Based on the popular 
APBA board game. 
Manage the pros with 
complete 1984 stats on 
676 players on 2 disks. 



FIX IT 





B-M,,*-^ 



FIX IT — A construction 
set for the mind. Salve 
over 200 colorful brain 
teasers to set imagina- 
tive machines in motion. 




TOURNAMENT 
BRIDGE— ComoetiHon 
and practice for tne 
serious bridge player. 




HO! HO! HO!— 5 family 
Christmas games at a 
special holiday price. 



MAKING MUSICON 
MICROS— The creaHve, 
musical approach to 
BASIC computer pro- 
gramming. 





ALL THE BEST FROM OUR HOUSE TO YOUR HOUSE. 

Visit your software dealer, or call 1-800-638-6460 (in MD, 800-492-0782). 

PEANUTS Charactcri: c 1^50. 1952. 1958. I960, 1%S, 1971, United FealureSvndiwle, lnc.;GARFiELDi ' 197S, UiiiteJ yraluri'Svndic.ilf, Ini,: MR, & MRS, TOTATO HEAD: 
«19S5Ha5bro. lnC-; + CraphicscreatedwithI>enquinSoflwarc's'GraphiC5MJKician.' C 1983 KandDrnKmise, Inc. All riphis resmed. 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 36 



Introducing 
Discovery Software from World Book' 




B 



ecause 




his mind is still open after 
school closes. 



Your child's inquiring mind needs continual 
stimulation and challenge. World Book has long 
been a trusted source for sujipiying the quality 
educational information your child seeks. Now 
you can buy educational software with those 
same standards of excellence: Discovery Software 
from World Book™ 



Discovert' Software from World 
Book is a series of 21 imagi- 
native software jsrograms designed to reinforce 
your child's basic classroom education at three 
key age levels; Preschool (3-5), Primary (6-10), 
and Intermediate (1 C) and up). 
Educational software that understands the 
learning process. 

Educators, consultants, and children ha\'e tested 
and evaluated the conccjii.s, proentaiion 
methods, and educarional \-aluc of Disco\-er\^ 
Software frc^m World Book. When it comes to 
learning, were not playing games. 

See your local software dealer or call World 
Book Discoverv, Inc. at 1-800-292-9090 (In Ohio 
1-800-423-7755)1 

Available for the Apple H® family, Tandv® 1000, 
IBM® PC, and PCjr 



DIsctHTfJ' Software fnim Vturld WxA 
is a iradenurk of WVirld Douk, Inc. 
Appk b. -1 rt.-gi.stt'utt trademark ul' Appk- 
Qjmputcr, Inc. J 

Tandy is a rtflistercd iradcmark of Tand)- 
Corporation. 

IBM i.s a rcgi.stcrcd iridcmark of imer- 
naiiunal Husines.s MachlnL*s Corporation 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 51 



World Book Discovery, Inc. 



5700 Lombardo «::taitre, Siiite 120, Seven Hills, OH 44131 
1-800-292-9090 (in Ohio 1-800-423-7755) 



HOME-SCHOOL CONNECTION 

PRESCHOOLERS, PARENTS, AND SOFIWARE 
Young Children Can Reap Learning Rewards When 
Teamed Up With Computers and the Right Programs 



BY CHRISTINE Z. CATALDO 

Many parents buy a computer, hop- 
ing it will benefit very young chil- 
dren. The presence of the computer, 
some parents believe, willjamiliar- 
ize children with computer technol- 
ogy as well as help them perform 
better in school. Most educators, 
however, counsel parents oj pre- 
schoolers to buy a computer only if 
they will put it to a primary use oJ 
their own. This introduces the child 
to the computer as a tool. 

How can we determine the com- 
puter's benejils for preschool-age 
children? A project at the Early 
Childhood Research Center (ECRC) 
at the State University of New York 
at Bujfalo can provide some an- 
swers. The researchers directing the 
project are Dr. Christine Cataldo. 
associate professor in early child- 
hood education: Dr. Teresa Rose- 
grant, assistant professor in early 
childhood education: and Dr. Da- 
vid Farr. professor in educational 
psychology. This article is based on 
Dr. Cataldo's report oJ their find- 
ings. 

Microcomputers and preschoolers 
are a natural combination, everyone 
knows — they're just about the same 
age. But a successful combination 
requires two vital ingredients not al- 
ways easy to come by: an involved 
adult and good software. Both are 
absolutely essential. 

WHAT THE KIDS WANT AND 
GET FROM COMPUTERS 

Our obser\'ation of 300 children 
over a period of two years produced 
some consistent conclusions about 
what kids want and get from using 
computers. 

Its apparent that children find 
certain basics irresistible. The first 
of these is control. Most young chil- 
dren love the feeling of independence 
they get when they direct the com- 
puter. One form of control a comput- 
er gives is the power to repeat (to a 
point no adult could tolerate) some- 
thing that fascinates a child. 

Computer/eedbacfc is another fea- 
ture kids respond to. But while 
sound, color, and animated respons- 




es are all important, children only 
appreciate them if they are meaning- 
ful parts of a program. 

Related to both control and feed- 
back are the concrete results chil- 
dren can see from their efforts. Fa- 
vorite software for kids often 
provides a print option or at least 
the chance to save work. It's very 
gratifying for children to be able to 
go back to what they've done, either 
in print form or on the computer. 

Another important benefit of the 
computer for young children is as- 
sistance and support. The computer 
serves as a gracious, patient teacher. 

Long-term computer use seems to 
Improve learning behavior in several 
ways. The sense of competence chil- 
dren gain from successful use of the 
computer results in an increased 
willingness to lake risks, test new 
ideas, and better focus on tasks. 
Children are serious about using 
both computer hardware and soft- 
ware. They want to use the keyboard 
like the adults around them do. And 
they want software that makes 
sense. 

THE ROLE OF PARENTS 

Parents also are critical to the suc- 
cess of children with computers be- 
cause they select their software and 
affect its use. In our studies, the 
children often needed help. Even on 



the rare occasions when there was 
independent use or exploration, the 
children sought to share their dis- 
coveries. We concluded that in using 
computers with preschoolers, there 
is no escaping the need for ongoing 
adult participation. 

It may even be that the help of 
mothers and fathers is just what it 
takes to make a child's computer 
use enjoyable and successful. If the 
programs provide content and meth- 
ods appropriate for good learning 
and play, parents will be able to ex- 
pand what children can gain. 

There arc four basic roles that 
adults fill in working with preschool- 
ers and software. 

Supervisor. From the moment a 
toddler approaches an expensive 
piece of machinery, such as a com- 
puter, parents must adopt the role 
of supervisor. To avoid damage to 
the computer and software, as well 
as to protect children from electrical 
shock, there need to be household 
rules related to computer use. In 
their roles as supervisors, parents 
also informally evaluate software, 
make future purchasing decisions, 
and take care of maintenance prob- 
lems, including the need for any 
software replacements. 

Teacher. This is the most signifi- 
cant role parents play in their in- 
volvement with children. Preschool- 



NOVEMBER 1985 25 



HOME-SCHOOL CONMECTION 



crs have to be taught to depress the 
keys using one finger and a quick 
press-and-lift motion. They have to 
understand the need to find one spe- 
cific key required by the program 
and to avoid accidentally leaning on 
other keys. If a joystick is included. 
they have to be taught how to use it 
and be allowed to practice their new 
skills. 

Further, the impulsive preschooler 
should be encouraged to be patient 
when using a computer. Waiting for 
the software to boot is just one ex- 
ample of when computers seem to 
take forever. Menus, directions, and 
cues arc also taxing for young chil- 
dren, who arc limited in reading and 
logic skills. Demonstrating, then be- 
ing a guide or a restraint for the 
child in times of frustration, are all 
helpful. 

Adult patience is a must to get 
through the seemingly endless expla- 
nations, clarifications, and repeti- 
tions. Children may meet unlimited 
challenges, but they will require par- 
ents to teach them how to arrive at 
the answers, 

Cwide. Even if parents are not di- 
rectly teaching their children, they 
are likely to find themselves involved 
in guiding them through their activ- 
ities. Some programs require adult 
participation, others Include timed 
tasks or require a parent's encour- 



agement to try something new or 
challenging. 

Playmate. Most preschool soft- 
ware contains strong elements of 
play designed to keep the child inter- 
ested in a work or learning activity. 
At home, parents have to be the 
playmates so readily available at 
school. Children want to share their 
experiences and feelings — ranging 
from pride at success to disappoint- 
ment at failure. Playmates help 
make using the computer a sociable 
experience, and when parents ser\'e 
as playmates, families benefit from 
the closeness. 

JUDGING SOFTWARE 

The real key to success with the 
computer is in judging software. 
Planning and work are required to 
avoid the frustration and disap- 
pointment that can occur when the 
wrong software is used. 

The best way to choose software is 
to try it out with your child — not al- 
ways an easy thing to do. Some 
stores have demonstration copies, 
and certain libraries maintain exten- 
sive software collections. Some 
schools may allow you to try out 
their software, or at least share find- 
ings with you. 

Friends and neighbors may also be 
a good source of information, and 
may even provide an opportunity to 



actually see a program in use. 

If you can't find a way to actually 
tr>' the product, read reviews and 
recommendations carefully. For ex- 
ample, look for endorsements from 
educational groups. Also check for 
an indication that the software was 
used by children over a period of 
time, not just looked at by an adult 
sitting in an office. In any case, look 
for information on the level of devel- 
opment required by the program, 
value to the child, and degree of pa- 
rental assistance required. 

There's no getting around the 
need for effort by parents to sort out 
the best programs aimed at young 
children. Many are too difficult for 
preschoolers: nor do children enjoy 
all of them. Very few programs are 
good for both learning and play, and 
each is important in a child's 
healthy development. 

Of course, not every activity 
should be translated for the comput- 
er. And some children won't want to 
use the computer at all. It takes par- 
ents' good judgment to determine 
the best course. In many cases, the 
benefits will be obvious, and. on oc- 
casion, a giant developmental step 
may result from using a program. 
But. for the most part, it will be par- 
ents (with effective use of computer 
technology) who will get the credit 
for helping their youngsters. H 



Title 



PublisKer 



TRIED- ANDTRUi SOFTWARE t 

Pescriptian Hardware/Price 



Bodi; Awareness learning Weli 



Charlie Brown's 
ABC's 



Body parts and cloLhing-malch gamt- 



48K Apple; $50 



Rating 



Random House Very humorous lettcr-reconnltlon program 4SK Apple. C 64; S30 



Delta Drawing 



Spinnaker 



An Introduction lo draw-programming 



Early Games 



Springboard 



48K Apple. 16K Atari. C 64, 124K IBM PC 

w/graphics card/PCjr: S24-S40 



Simple counting tasks vvHh charm 



Ernie's Quiz 



Apple 



Uses popular Miippets 



48K Apple. 48K Atari. C 64, 64KIBM PC/PCjr: S35 



Pacemaker 



Spinnaker 



64K Apple; S25 



tJser builds faces, then controls them 



Gertrude's Svcrcts The Learning Co. Varied sorting and matching tasks 



48K Apple lle/I! + . <taK Atari. C 64. 64K IBM PC/ 
PC)r:S21-S25 



Hey Diddle Diddle Spinnaker 



Uses nursery rhvmes to read 



48K Apple. C 64: S45 



48K Apple llc/ll + , 32K Atari, C 64. 64K IBM 
PC; S30 



Hodge Podge 



Dynacomp 



Kldivrtter 



A "press-any-key" exploration program for 46K Appie, 32K Atari, TRS-80 Models 1/111/4: 
a first e.\perlence S 15-81 9 



Spinnaker 



Great for writing stories with pictures 



48K Apple. 16K Atari. C 64, 64K IBM PC/PC/r: 
S27-S30 



Ktndercomp 



Spinnaker 



A mixture of learning activities 



KoaJaPatnter 



Koala 
Technologies 



4»K Apple. 16K Atari, C 64, 64K IBM PC/PCjr: 
$21 -$30 



Many-faceted drawing program 



48K Apple lle/IIc. C 64, 128K IBM PCjr. KoalaPad ••• 
included: S99-S150 



Listen to Learn 



!BM 



A voice/writing program 



128K IBM PC and compatibles: S347-S447 with Echo * " 
speech syitth. Apple vereion ai-ailable from Scholastic. 



Mcikc'-a-Match 



Springboard 



Varied sorting games 



Music Maestro 



Springboard 



Challenging, but fun, for melodies and 
sounds 



48K Apple. 48K Atari, C 64 . 64K IBM PC/PCjr; $30 



48K Apple. 48K Atari, C 64. 64K IBM PClt'Cjr: S35 " 



The Print Shop 



Brodcrbund 



A sign-maker program for all ages 



48K Apple. 48K Atari. C 64, 1 28K IBM PC/PC/r. •" 

512KMac: S45-S80 



Snoopy "s Reacting 
Machine 



Random House 



Characiers use word-families 



48K Appie, C 64. 128K IBM PCjr: S30-S40 



Stlckybear ABC 



Xerox-Weekly 
Reader 



Ctiarming graphics to explore letters and 48K Apple. 48K Atari, C 64; S30-S40 
words 



Slickybear 
Numbers 



Xerox-Weekly 
Reader 



Delightful for numbers 



48K Apple. 4SK Atari, C 64: S30-$40 



Turtle Tracks 



Scholastic 



Logo-type programming in draw mode 



48K Apple. 32K Atari. C 64. 96K IBM PC. 32K TI 
99/4Aw/eXt. BASIC. VlC-20 W/8KRAM cart,; S40 



•Good "Very Good '"Excellent tSelected by the Early Childhood Research Center. 



26 FAMILY COMPUTING 



WINTER games: 





:i 




You've captured the gold in Summer 
Games® and Summer Games II™. Now 
it's on to the Winter Camesl And what 
an incredible setting— a completely 
realistic winter wonderland featuring 
seven action-packed events. 

At the Ski Jump you control your 
form in mid-air, knees straight, leaning 
forward. Hot Dog Aerials challenges 
your courage and your sense of humor. 
In Figure Skating you leap into Double 
and TViple Lutz jumps— wow the crowd 
with a perfect Camel into a Sit Spin. 
It's timing and style that counts. Free 
Skating lets you choreograph your own 
routines. In Speed Skating it's you 
against a fellow speed demon— the 
fastest human beings on level earth! 
And the Bobsled— still faster as you fly 
around hairpin turns, leaning hard to 
.stay in the tube. Finally the Biathlon, 
the ultimate challenge to your endur- 
ance in cross-country skiing and 
marksmanship. 

All of this fun and excitement is 
easy to learn and play. You control the 



action with the joystick, animating your 
player for style and rhythm. You choose 
the country you want to represent. 
Listen to its national anthem. Then it's 
practice, training and learning a win- 
ning strategy for each event. Now the 
Opening Ceremony and the competi- 
tion begins— against your friends or 
the computer. Will you be the one who 
takes the gold at the Awards Ceremony? 
Will your name be etched amongst the 
World Record holders? 

The quest for the gold continues... 
And it's all here— the strategy; the 
challenge, the competition, and 
pageantry of Winter Games! 

flPPlt MAC C64/HB 

H'ini^ Games t^ ^ ^ 




iiiJi !>L-c ,11. 19SS. OHcIjI nlks 




1043 Kiel Ct., Sunnvvale. CA 94089 



Strategy Games for the Action-Game Player 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 15 



GAMES 

PRETZELS AND POPCORN FUN 

Boot Up a Tried-ond-True Computer Game 

foro Relaxing Evening With Friends 



BY JAMES DELSON 

Everybody loves playing games. 
Sure, there are different levels of ex- 
pertise and types of games. But 
whether its pingpong in the base- 
ment, croquet in the backyard, or a 
crossword puzzle on the couch, gam- 
ing is an integral part of our li\es. 

Everv'one has a favorite. More 
times than not. the preferred choice 
will be a game you've played many 
times, whose rules and nuances 
you've memorized. These games can 
be a minivacation from the ordinary 
trials and tribulations of life. 

"Pretzels and popcorn fun" is a 
good term to describe playing these 
familiar games. It conjures up the 
image of a relaxed evening with fam- 
ily or friends and a good-natured 
contest in which the outcome isn't 
nearly as important as the compan- 
ionship. 

Traditional board games include 
classics like "Monopoly." "Scrabble." 
and "Clue"; newer titles like "Trivial 
Pursuit": and more esoteric fare, 
such as "Diplomacy," and "Dun- 
geons and IDragons." 

NEW-FOUND TRADITIONS 

Then, of course, there's the whole 
new field of computer games. A bur- 
geoning interest in them has 
spawned a number of "popcorn pro- 
grams." That's to be expected if you 
consider that more computer games 
have been introduced In the past 
three years than board games in the 
last two decades! 

Some programs have become cult 
favorites, including Diplomacy. Ar- 
chon. Lode Runner. Rails West! or 
President Elect. Also enjoyable are 
newly discovered gems such as Field 
of Fire. Racing Destruction Set, The 
Ancient Art of War. or On-Jield Foot- 
ball. 

Want to boot up a tried-and-true 
program with your friends for a 
night of enchantment? Shall it be a 
dazzling car race, a plot to rule the 
world, or simply a campaign to be 
president? To help choose which 
one to serve with your pretzels and 



JAMES DELSON IS FAMILY COMi'UTENC S games 

critic. 




popcorn, here's a list of eminently 
playable games that the hard- 
working playtesters and reviewers 
for FAMILY coMPUTi.^G find the most 
appealing. Like you, these gifted am- 
ateurs enjoy relaxing at the end of 
the day by escaping into a fantasy 
world. 

All games that run on a Commo- 
dore 64 also work on a C 128. 

Came listings Jor Atari will not 
run on the 520ST. 

Fast-Playing 

Less than two hours 

ARCADE 

Includes strategy/arcode 

These go a step beyond the classic 
arcade games and require a little 
skill and strategy to play well. 

Archon (Electronic Arts); 64K Ap- 
ple; 48K Atari; C 64; 64K IBM PC; 
S23~S35. 

Archon //: ADEPT (Electronic 
Arts); 64K Apple: 64K Atari: C 64; 
S33-S40. 

B.C. 11, Grog's Revenge (Sierra On- 
Line): C 64; S35. 

B.C.'s Quest for Tires (Sierra On- 
Line); C 64; S35. 

Beach-Head {Access): 48K Atari: 
C64; 635. 

Beach-Head 11: The Dictator 
Strikes Back (Access!; 48 K Atari; 
C 64: S40. 

Boulder Dash (Micro Fun/First 



Star): 32K Atari; C 64; S30: 128K 
IBM PC/PCjr; S35. 

Broadsides (Strategic Simula- 
tions. Inc.); 48K Apple; 48K Atari: 
C 64; $40. 

Jumpmart (Epyx); 48K Apple; 48K 
Atari: C 64; SIS. 

Raid on Bungellng Bay (Broder- 
bund); C 64; S30. 

Spy Hunter (Coleco Industries, 
Inc.); ADAM (cart.); S30. 

Star fiaiders (Atari): 16K Atari; 
S18. 



FLIGHT SIMULATORS 

Although these games require 
many hours of practice, they're easy 
to play once the basic skills have 
been mastered. 

F-15 Strike Eagle (MicroProse 
Software): 64K Apple: 48K Atari: 
C 64: 64K IBM PC/PCjr; S35. 

Flight Simulator (Microsoft); 128K 
IBM PC/PCj'r/XT/AT; S50. 

Flight Simulator II (subLOGIC): 
48K Apple; 48K Atari; C 64: S50; 
S40 for Atari and Commodore cas- 
sette versions. 

Mig Alley Ace (MicroProse Soft- 
ware): 48K Atari: C 64; S35. 

Skyfox (Electronic Arts); C 64; 
planned for 64K Apple; 833-$40. 

FINANCIAL 

Quick Monopoly-like thrills are 
achieved in very little time. 

Conglomerates Collide (Rockroy, 

Inc.): 48K Apple; S30. 



28 FAMILY COMPUTING 




im 



f. 



It takes all kinds to make 

a galaxy interesting. Like 

you, a techno-scavenger. 

Your kind are out to get 

rich scavenging Ancient 

- - _ technology. And now 

.-L. " - you've found the fabled 

Koronis Rift— the weapons testing grounds of the 
Ancients. The chance of a lifetime awaits you. 

Abandoned war hulks Jitter the Rift— crammed with 
exotic weapons and technology. The lifelike fractal 
graphics take you to this mythical land of the Ancients. 
The mind's-eye point of view puts you right in the driver's 
seat of a Surface Rover. A hulk looms before you— 
your mind races, feverishly planning a strategy. What 
weapons do you need to survive? What technology will 
fetch the highest price? If you can pack your battered 
Rover full— you'll be rich beyond your wildest dreams. 
But it won't be easy The Guardians— genetically 

Lucasfilm Games. Kgronis Rift, ajld all dements of Uie game faiiLisy^T.Mi t- 1985UK3sfiIni lid.ll.Fl.t. All Hj^hts K(5^:r.Y-d Kpi. Int , Ay'lmnii-d LV-c J 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 16 



engineered mutants— stand watch over their creators' 
technology And they deal swiftly and ruthlessly with 
characters like techno-scavengers. 

But you've got a plan. If you and your trusty Science 
Droid can scavenge the right combination of weapons 
and technology— and get off the planet alive— you'll 
make it big. Destroy the Guardian base and you'll even 
be a hero! The treasures of the Ancients are yours . . . 
if you've got what it takes. 

(64/118 AUBI APPU 




t 



^rsj: 




' ScespecTAllvniirkcd t^iviifiir detaik 



1043 Kiel Ct., Sunnyvale, CA 94089 

Stmtegy Games for the Actkm-Game flayer 



: RcfiBlcT?d TVadfriarkii of Ep>x Ire 



MANAGING YOUR CHECKBOOK? 

MANAGING YOUR BUDGET? 

MANAGING YOUR BILLS? 

MANAGING YOUR CASH FLOW? 

MANAGING YOUR TAXES? 

MANAGING YOUR INSURANCE? 

MANAGING YOUR STOCKS? 

MANAGING YOUR BONDS? 

MANAGING YOUR REAL ESTATE? 

MANAGING YOUR TAX SHELTERS? 

MANAGING YOUR SAVINGS? 

MANAGING YOUR MORTGAGE? 

MANAGING YOUR AUTO LOAN? 

MANAGING YOUR RETIREMENT? 

MANAGING YOUR CALENDAR? 

MANAGING YOUR CHARGE ACCOUNTS? 

MANAGING YOUR CAPITAL GAINS? 

MANAGING YOUR ANNUITIES? 

MANAGING YOUR APPOINTMENTS? 

MANAGING YOUR DIVIDENDS? 

MANAGING YOUR INTEREST? 

MANAGING YOUR RECORDS? 

MANAGING YOUR VALUABLES? 

MANAGING YOUR KEOCH'S? 

MANAGING YOUR IRA'S? 



MANAGING YOUR MONEY' 
BY ANDREW TOBIAS. 
THE ONLY FINANCIAL 
SOFTWARE THAT DOES IT ALL. 




S)19B5 • MECA- 285 RIVERSIDE AVENUE. WESTPORT, a O6880.(203l 222-1000 • For IBM PC. XT, AT, PC jr l255KlJANDY12a)HDJANDy 1000 (25610. APPLE lie. lie I128K. Two Drives) 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 27 



GAMES 



Fortune Builder (Coleco Industries 
Inc.): ADAM (cart.): S30. 

SPORTS 

Colorful, fast-moving and always 
fun, for a whole game's worth or 
even for a few minutes. 

The Activision Decathlon (Activi- 
sion): 16K Atari (cart.); C 64; S25- 
S30. 

Julius Erving and Larry Bird Go 
One-On-One (Electronic Arts): 48K 
Apple: 48K Atari; C 64: 64K IBM PC; 
S33-S40. 

Microsoft Decathlon (IBM): 64K 
IBM PC: 128K IBM PC XT; requires 
color adapter: $35. 

On-Court Tennis (Gamestar); C 64: 
S30. 

On-Field Football (Gamestar): C 64; 
S30. 

Pitstop n (Epyx); 64K Apple: 48K 
Atari: S40. 

Summer Games (Epyx): 64K Ap- 
ple: 48K Atari; C 64; $40. 



CONSTRUCTION SETS 

Either as build-it-yourself games 
(which take more time) or as good 
old arcade fun. these adventures 
have great play systems and are nev- 
er dull. 




Lode Runner (Braderbund): 48K 
Apple; 48K Atari: C 64; 128K IBM 
PC/PCjr/XT: S35-$40. 

Mail Order Monsters (Electronic 
Arts): C 64: S33. 

Mr. Robot and His Robot Factory 
(Datamost): 48K Apple; 32K Atari: 
C 64: S20. 

Pinball Construction Set (Elec- 
tronic Arts): 48K Apple: 48K Atari; 
C 64; 64K IBM PC: $23-640. 

Racing Destruction Set (Electronic 
Arts); C 64: $33. 

Slow*Playing 

More than two hours 



STRATEGY AND TACTICS 

An evening's stimulating activity 
or just a true pretzcl-and-popcorn 
slugfest. these games are easy to 
play once you figure them out. 



The Ancient Art oj War (Broder- 
bund): 128K IBM PC/PCjr/XT: 845. 

Battle for Normandy (SSI); 48K 
Apple; 4bK Atari: C 64; 64K IBM PC: 
S40. 

Chickamauga (Game Designer's 
Workshop); 48K Atari: S35. 

Dreadnoughts (The Avalon Hill 
Game Co.): 48K Apple: C 64: $30. 

Field oJFire (SSI): 48K Atari: 
C 64: $40. 

Legionnaire (The Avalon Hill 
Game Co.); 48K Apple; 32K Atari; 
C 64; S30. 

Monty PiaysScrabbie (Epyx): C 64; 
640. 

Operation Whirlwind (Broder- 
bund); 48K Atari; C 64: $40. 

Paris in Danger (The Avalon Hill 
Game Co.): 48K Atari: S35. 

Rejorger 88 (SSI); 48K Apple: 48K 
Atari: $60. 

Sargon III (Hayden Software): 64K 
Apple; 64K Atari: C 64, 64K IBM PC/ 
PCjr; 128K Macintosh; $50. 

The Shattered Alliance (SSI): 48K 
Apple: 40K Atari: $20. 

POLITICS AND FINANCE 

These games, I think, are the most 
rewarding kind to relax with be- 
cause they're provocative and 
achieve the maximum amount of 
player interaction. May last all night. 

Cartels and Cutthroats (SSI): 48K 
Apple; C 64: 128K IBM PC/PCjr; $40. 

Cosmic Balance II (SSI); 48K Ap- 
ple: 48K Atari: C 64; S40. 

Diplomacy (The Avalon Hill Game 
Co.); 256K IBM PC/PCjr $50; 48K 
TRS-80 Model 111 or 4: $25. 




Geopolitique 1990 (SSI); 48K Ap- 
ple: C 64; S40. 

Incunabula [The Avalon Hill Game 
Co.): 128K IBM PC/PCjr: S30. 

M.V.L.E (Electronic Arts); 48K 
Atari; C 64: $23. 

President Elect (SSI); 48K Apple: 
C 64: 840. 

Rails West! (SSI); 48K Apple: 40K 
Atari: C 64: $40. 

The Seven Cities of Gold (Elec- 
tronic Arts): 64K Apple: C 64; 64K 
IBM PC: $33-840. fl 



MANAGING 
YOUR MONEY* 

IS NOW 

AVAILABLE ON 

APPLE 

lie AND He. 



Coming 
October 15th. 




APPLE Me. ( Ic (128K. 80-Colurnn Monitor Two Drives) 

NOVEMBER 1985 31 




PRICE 
BUSTERS 




apple *" atari "' commodore '* ibm-pc " pc-jr 

games ' educalion * home management 

business * utilities " systems 

on 

disks cartridges cassettes 

Our prices are 25% to 50% or more below retail. 

We have tliousands ol dilferenl compuler items. 

And. YES. itiey are ttie Real Ttiing,..NOT COPIES. 

Please call or write tor our current price lisl. 

Be sure to tell us what computer you have. 

CODE lor this PRICE LIST 

AP2=Applell. II + . lie. HE ATD=AiariDisk 

C64=C/6'(Disk iBt^ = iBU-PC3n[!IBM-PC|r 

B^Etfjcational h = Home Use r = Retreatioial 

AP2 ATD C64 IBM Name of Program or Item 

524 S24 $24 S24 r Bruce Lee -OR Lode Runner 
S23 .. S23 r Karateka -on F15 StrikeEagle 
S35 S3b S35 S33 r Flignt Simulator II 

S3b r Jei |Su3it>§ic) 

S39 S39 S39 S39 r Ultima 2 -OR Ullima 3 

S39 . , r Ultima 4 

S26 $23 S23 $26 e/r Httcnhiker's Guide- Galaxy 

S26 S26 r Gale 

530 S30 r King's Quest 2 IAP2 Soon) 

S26 S25 $26 $26 r Zork 1 (32k) 

$32 ... $32 $32 r Sargon 3 

$26 $26 $26 . . r Summe- Games 

$26 r Summer Games 2 

$29 r Ancient Art ol War 

S50 .. $50 $50" e Muppel Keys + Disk Cir only) 

532 $30 $30 $39" h Prim SnopCPrinl Master) 

533 ... $33 e/h Newsroom (No PCjr, C64 soon) 
S26 S26 S26 $26 e/h Mastertype. New S Improved 
S33 S35 S33 $33 e Matli Blaster (Davidson) 

S33 S35 $33 S33 e Spell It -OR Wort Attach 
S44 . S44 $44 e SpeeOreader II (Davidson) 
S26 ... S26 S26 e Reader Rabbit (Leiming Co) 
S36 n Sidekick (12Bk] 

531 S3t - JOYSTICK MACH 2 (Hayes) 

S38 S3B - JOYSTICK IvIACH 3 (Hayes) 

... S24 $24 . - JOYSTICK Wico 3-Way Deluxe 
Ws Carry ALL of Electronic Arts Products such as: 

525 SI 7 St 7 S25 ( Arclion (64k) 

528 S23 S23 ,. r AiChon 2: Adept (64k) 

535 535 . r Europe Ablaze 

528 523 523 529 r 1 on 1 Dr. J S Larry Bird 

525 517 517 525 h Cul/Pasle Wrd Prac (Wo A2 + ) 

528 523 S23 r Movie Maker 

514 512 512 514 r Murder on the Zinderneuf 

J28 SI 7 517 528 h Music Conslrudion Set 

$25 517 SI? S25 f Pinnall Construcllon Set 

$28 S23 S23 $28 e/r Seven Cities of Gold 

S28 ... $23 .. r Sky Fm 

The lollowing are lor C/64 disk Price is S9 each: 1985: 

The Day Alter. Quest lor Ihe Holy Grait; KIkslart lOllread 

simulalor): BMX Hacers. Black Crystal. Se Kaa ol Asstan 

Slarace; Chiller. 

BACKUP MOST PROTECTED DISKS WITH 

COPY II PLUS. COPY 11 MAG. COPY II 64, COPY II PC 
Oy Central Point S/ware Lisi=S40 Our Pfice=S26 

THE FINE PRINT 

Calilornia Byyers Only: Please add 6% Sales Tax. 
NEW SHIPPING HATES EFFECTIVE NOV 15. 1985 





4B Contiguous Slates 


Alaska/Hawaii 


Soltware 






FPO/APO/Canada 


Shipping 


U-P.S. 


U.P.S. 


Puerto Rico 


Cost For: 


Ground 


Z-Dsy Air 


(Air) 


1 llem 


3.50 


5.50 


7.50 


2 Hems 


5.50 


8.00 


10-00 


3 Hems 


7.50 


to 50 


12.50 


4 Hems 


9.5fl 


13 00 


15.00 


5 Hems 


11 50 


15,50 


17.50 


6 Items 


13.50 


1800 


20.00 


7 or Wore 


15.00 


20,00 


22.00 



VISA & U/CARD: Ptease add Z% to the aDove cash prices. 

AEso include: Card I: Expiration Date: and Cardholder's 

signature. 
Cashiers Ch«l(/ Credit Can] /Money Orders usually stripped 

cul Within Z^ hours Other cliec<s: 1 weel< 
Putjlic/Parocnial School Purchase Ordefs Accepted. 
Price /Availstdity suOject to change- In case ol probfems, 
your phon« nur^Der will help us nolily you. 

FAIVIILY DISCOUNT 
COMPUTER PRODUCTS 

716 E. Valley Parkway #244 
Escondido, CA 92025 
(619) 489-1040 

$1. REBATE on Phone Orders 



COMPUTING CLINIC 

DISK DENSITIES • KEYBOARD PROGRAMS • 
TERMINAL SOFTWARE 



BY JEFFREY BAIRSTOW 

Whot is the difference between 
single- and double-density 

disks? Cl-IAD BAKER 

Chicago, Illinois 

Floppy disk drives come in several 
varieties — single-sided, double-sided, 
single-density, and double-density. 
This means they read and write on 
disks in those formats. Sinf*lc-sided 
drives write on only one side of a 
disk, double-sided write on both 
sides. Naturally, more information 
can be stored on a disk used in a 
double-sided drive. 

In addition, there are at least two 
ways of recording data on disks — 
single-density and double-density. 
Double-density recording packs 
about twice as much information on 
a disk as single-density docs. For in- 
stance. Apple II drives, which store 
143K, arc single-density: IBM PC 
drives, which store 360K, are dou- 
ble. Some high-performance, double- 
sided, double-density disk drives can 
store nearly 1.6 megabytes (1600K) 
of data! 

It's important to know which tjrpe 
of disk drive your computer has so 
you can buy the appropriate disk. 
For example, disks for double-sided, 
double-density drives are usually 
designated "2S/2D" on the box. This 
means that the manufacturer certi- 
fies that the magnetic coating on 
both sides of the disk is of high 
enough quality to record informa- 
tion at double density. If in doubt, 
ask before you buy. Be assured, 
however, that you can't harm the 
drive by using the WTong disk. It 
just might not work as well as you'd 
want. 

Is there any way to disable and 
reenable certain keys on the 
IBM PC, such as NUM LOCK or 
CAPS LOCK? STEVEN J.IlV blatt 

Mt. Shasta. California 

A number of keyboard programs 
make it possible to change the key 
functions on the IBM PC. Two of the 
most popular arc ProKey (RoseSoft) 
and SuperKey (Borland Internation- 
al). Both allow you to specify the use 
of every key on the board — changing 
NUM LOCK to BREAK, for example, 
or disabling the NUM LOCK key alto- 

je;kkhey baikstow is a contributing editor 

to KA.MtLYCOMPUTtN*G. 



gether. You can also change the let- 
ter and numeral keys — making 1 re- 
spond as 9. turning A into Z, etc. 
And ProKey and SuperKey also let 
you program keystroke sequences 
that can be recalled by pressing a 
two-key combination (e.g. CTRL D). 

In BASIC, function keys are pre- 
programmed to represent keystroke 
sequences (for example, pressing F2 
has the same effect as typing run 
and pressing e.\ter). Using the BA- 
SIC KEY command, you can repro- 
gram each function key to produce 
any series of up to 15 keystrokes. 

In some versions of BASIC, the key 
command will also let you "trap" 
most keys, that is, branch to a spe- 
cial part of your program whenever a 
particular key is pressed. This meth- 
od is often used to disable the 
FUNCTION-BREAK and CTRL-ALT- 
DEL key combinations. 

What is "terminal software" 
and how is it used? tkov Monday 
Oshkosh. Wisconsin 

"Terminal software," short lor "ter- 
minal emulation software." is really 
just communications software. The 
name dates back to the days when 
rnost computing was done on main- 
frame computers, accessed by so- 
called "dumb terminals." Terminal 
emulation software made it easy to 
connect a microcomputer to a main- 
frame by causing the micro to mim- 
ic, or "emulate," a dumb terminal. 

Nowadays, terminal software is 
much more versatile. It allows your 
compuler to communicate with your 
friend's micro down the street as 
well as with online services such as 
CompuServe or The Source. You can 
communicate via phone lines, or by 
c:abling together the two computers' 
serial ports (if the machines arc 
close enough to each other). And 
most terminal software goes a step 
beyond the old dumb terminals by 
permitting you to send or receive 
(upload or download) files. 

For more information about termi- 
nal programs, 1 suggest you look at 
Personal Computer Communica- 
tions by Alfred Glossbrenner (St. 
Martin's Press. New York), a compre- 
hensive, readable book. You can also 
check out our "Tips on Buying Com- 
munications Software" in the March 

1985 Issue of FAMILY COMPUTING, SI 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 19 



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CIRCLE READER SERVICE 6 



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CIRCLE READER SERVICE 7 




HT j6C GEUiAN AND NICK SULLIVAN 



The ways of looking at computers change every year. Not 
long ago, memory was the end-all and be-all. A computer 
with a gargantuan 64K looked pretty good. Later, it was 
disk drives. A 64K computer with a built-in disk drive, or 
sold in a package with an external drive, was the rage. 
Then, with the advent of Macintosh technology and the 

Joe Gelman has written a number of "Bayer's Guides." 
including "Computers" and "Low-Cost Printers" in the June 
and September Issues. Nick Sullivan is a senior editor at family 

COMPUTING. 



mouse, "ease of use" and "friendly environment" became 
catch phrases. 

All these features are still important. But today, most 
computers provide enough power to get most jobs done. 
And as manufacturers, spurred by engineers, added more 
and more features, buyers — with jobs to do, children to 
teach, and games to play — have started asking; "Will the 
computer In the store window work for me?" 

How do you answer that? 

There was a fairly good reply until recently. You figured 
out your needs, found the software that fulfilled them. 



NOVEMBER 1985 35 



then decided what equipment (64K and a disk drive, say) 
was required to run the software. If you could afford the 
chosen system, you took an open-minded leap — because 
how could you be sure you figured right — and lived happi- 
ly ever after. 

Now— just when you thought It was safe to buy that 
computer you Ve been researching for a year — some fiery 
new computers have injected the emotion that's been 
missing from the marketplace. Suddenly, rational advice 
doesn't make as much sense. 

The introduction of Atari's scintillating ST and Commo- 
dore's alluring Amiga, plus enhancements to Apple's mar- 
velous Macintosh, may cause a period of consumer confu- 
sion about what to buy. The ST and Amiga are selling for 
about SI, 000. which is In the ballpark for many consum- 
ers, and certainly adds freshness to the market- 
place. The happy compromise between manufacturer and 
consumer, and between price and performance, is still on 
the horizon. But it's getting closer by the minute. 

THREE GENERATIONS 

Deciding which computer to buy has never been easy for 
the first-timer. It's hard to know what you want, need, or 
like until you've spent some time with a computer. How- 
ever, the task may be easier if you know which category a 
particular computer fits into. Three broad groups can be 
broken down according to several generations of micro- 
computer technology. For purposes of illustration, we've 
equated these eras with three common machines — 4-cylin- 
der, slant-6, and V-8 car engines. Remember that the 
biggest engine is not always the best. 

First generation (4-cylinder engine). This group of mi- 
crocomputers—including the Apple II series. Atari XL and 
XE, Commodore 64 and 128, TRS-80 Model 4 and Color 
Computer — uses 8-bit microprocessors. They can access 
64K of memory at one time, which is vvhy 64K became 
such a common feature. If the computer has 128K (as the 
Atari 130XE. Commodore 128. and Apple lie do), the mi- 
croprocessor does not "see" it all at once, but transfers 
back and forth between two banks of 64K — a process 
called "bank-switching," 

First-generation computers began to emerge around 
1977 and have been refined to the point of doing almost 



anything, except large-scale business tasks. This is why 
they still sell well. They generally can be used with a 
television or a monitor, and most have good color graphics 
and sound for entertainment and educational software. 
These computers have been around so long that they are 
well supported with a wide range of software and peripher- 
als. However, their disk storage is lower, disk-access time 
and execution speed slower, and screen display fuzzier 
than newer computers". 

Second generation (Siant-6 engine). In 1 98 1 , the IBM 
PC hit the market with a so-called 16-bit (actually "8/16- 
bit") microprocessor and a 640K capacity. The 16-bit mi- 
croprocessors run faster than their 8-bit predecessors. 
Because of extra memory and higher speed, the IBM PC, 
successors (PC XT, PC AT), and many imitators were 
adopted as the computers-of-choice by those with busi- 
ness in mind. Many of these 16-bit computers, such as the 
Compaq Deskpro (see "Buyer's Guide to Business Com- 
puter Systems" in the October 1985 issue o/' family comput- 
ing), have minimal sound and color capability, so they're 
less adaptable for home use. {The exception is the Tandy 
1000.) Yet because they have larger memories, their S'/t- 
inch disk drives are designed to hold bigger programs and 
more files. 

TKird generation (V-S engine). Though not the first mi- 
crocomputer to use a 32-bit (actually "16/32 bit") micro- 
processor (the Tandy 6000 was), the Macintosh attracted 
more attention because it was designed to be used with a 
mouse. Combining a high-speed microprocessor, a 
mouse-driven operating system, and a S'/^-inch disk drive, 
it ushered in a whole new era of computing. For more 
than a year-and-a-half. Macintosh had the "state-of-the 
art" moniker to itself. Recently. Atari and Commodore 
have introduced similar computers (the 520ST and the 
Amiga), but with color and a lower price tag — heating up 
the competition. Software for all these computers is de- 
signed to use a mouse, drop-down or pull-down menus, 
and on-screen windows that can be expanded or shrunk. 
The software ranges from home to full business packages, 
with professional applications being the most common 
and educational software the least. Because these comput- 
ers have superb graphics and sound, the potential soft- 
ware for them is unlimited. 



SOME LEADING GENERAL-PURPOSE COMPUTERS 



Model 



List RAM: Dl»k 

Price StoHJ.fMa». Starage 



Hardware 
Included 



Software 
Included 



Serial/Parallel 
Ports 



Max. Text 
Display 



Apple lie 



SI. 195 128K 



143K 



5'/i-inch disk drive 



ProDOS. I3ASIC, tLitorlal.s 



2 serial 



80X24 



Apple He 

ProTesslonal 

System 



$1,795 12eK 



143K 



Two 5'/i-lnch disk drives, 
monochrome monitor 



ProDOS. iJASlC, lulorlal 



None 



80X24 



Apple 
Macintosh 



S2.195 128K/512K 



400K 3iA-lnch disk drive, 

monochrome monitor, 
mouse 



Finder. MacWrite. 
MacPaint 



2 serial 



Varies'' 



Atari I30XE 



S149 



12SK 



127K 



None 



BASIC 



Serial 



40x24 



Aiari 5205T 



S799' 



512K 



360K 31/a-ineh disk drive, 

monochrome monitor. 
mouse, numeric keypad 



TOS. GEM user interface. 
Logo^ 



Serial, parallel Varies^ 



Commodore 64 



SI49 



64K 



170K 



None 



BASIC 



Serial 



40x25 



Commodore 128 



S300 



128K' 



I70K' Numeric keypad 



BASIC, tutorial. CP/M 



Serial 



80x25 



Commodore Amiga SI .295 256K'-' 



8B0K 



SVi-inch disk drive, mouse, 
numeric keypad 



AmlgaDO.S, Inluiiion user 
interface. BASIC, Amiga 
Tutor 



Serial, parallel Varies^ 



IBM PC 



S2.295 256K/640K 



360K 



Tm'o 5Vi-inch disk drives, 
numeric ke>pad 



BASIC 



None 



80x25 



Tandy 10(M 



$999 



I28K/640K 



360K 



5'/j-lnch disk drive, 
numeric keypad 



MS-DOS. BASIC, 
DcskMale 



Parallel 



TRS-80 Color 
Computer 2 



siig 



16K/64K 



I56K 



None 



E.xiendcd Color BASIC 
(yvlth 64K version) 



Serial 



32 X 16 



TRS-SO Model 4D 



SI. 199 64Kyl28K 



368K Two 5'/i-lnch disk drives, 
monochrome monitor. 
numeric keypad 



TRSDOS 6.0, BASIC, 
DeskMate 



Serial, parallel 80x24 



1. S999 with RGB color monitor. 

2. Manufacturer promises expansion of C 128 to 512K and of Amiga to 8M. 

3. The Commodore 1571 disk drive will hold 360K I4I0K In CP/M mode). 



4. Manufacturer promises to add BASIC to language disk. 

5. Varies according lo font used: some are proportionally spaced. 



36 FAMILY COMPUTING 



MAKING A CHOICE 

Do you really need the latest-and-greatest computer? 
That depends on what you expect from a computer. The 
following capsule reviews of models from the leading mar- 
keters of general-purpose computers — good for business, 
education, and entertainment — will help narrow your 
choices. The company's current outlook and product line 
are examined. We don't list peripherals such as printers, 
modems, or specialized hardware, which are optional and 
readily available for most models. But be sure to keep 
these peripherals in mind (if they're not included) when 
pricing a full system. Figure S200-S500 for a disk drive, 
S250-S500 for a printer, and S200-S700 for a monitor. 

The strengths and weaknesses of each computer are 
detailed, including our overall Impressions of the system. 
Specific technical details for each computer can be found 
in the accompanying chart. 

No computer is perfect, but some may fit your needs. If 
the strengths are appealing and the weaknesses unimpor- 
tant, then that computer belongs high on your list. 



APPLE C 



Apple, once the darling of Silicon Valley, recently has tak- 
en its lumps with the rest of the hi-tech industry, and is 
now looking to settle down for slower but steadier long- 
term growth. Cofounder Stephen Wozniak ("The Woz") 
has left the company and sold most of his stock, and 
cofounder Steve Jobs, while still chairman of the board, 
has sold much of his stock and been removed from day-to- 
day operations, John Sculley, brought in last year by Jobs 
as chief executive officer to stabilize the company, is now 
the unqualified kingpin of this billion-dollar company. 

The problems can be traced to the fortunes of the Macin- 
tosh, which hasn't been able to crack IBM's stranglehold 
on business buyers and has been too expensive for most 
home buyers. It's selling better than the ill-fated Apple 111 
or Lisa, Apple's two previous stabs at the business market, 
but falling well below the company's expectations. Mean- 
while, the Apple II line, going since 1977 and stilt selling, 
proves over and over that it's the product with nine lives. 
The He and lie are Apple's bread-and-butter in an era of 
high-powered, mouse-driven Macintosh look-alikes! In 
fact, a whole line of NEWS (New and Exciting World of 



Max, 
Resolntien 



Cgrtridge 



Colors 



Voices 



Sprites 



560 X 192 



No 



16 



1 



560x192 



No 



16 



512x342 



No 



B&W 



None 



320x192 



Yes 



256 



640x400 



Yes 



512 



None 



320 X 200 



Yes 



16 



640x200 



Yes 



16 



640x400 



No 



4,096 



640 X 200 



No 



16 



None 



840 X 200 



No 



16 



None 



256 X 192 



Yes 



None 



128X64 



No 



B&W 



None 



Solutions) products that Apple has just introduced ensure 
that both the II line and Mac will continue to grow. 

APPLE lie 

Strengths. Because the "Woz machine" has been so 
widely used for so long, there's a vast selection of busi- 
ness, educational, and entertainment software for the He, 
Another of the lie's strong points is its expandability — the 
internal plug-in card slots support a wide variety of hard- 
ware add-ons (music smlhesizers, modems, video digitiz- 
ers, RAM disks, RGB output, a CP/M card, etc.). To update 
the lie to accommodate software that uses a mouse, pull- 
down menus, and windows, the He is now manufactured 
with the same chips as the lie. The He keyboard has a 
good, professional feci. 

While the standard Apple II disk drives store a paltry 
143K. which Is a limitation for serious daily use, Apple's 
new UniDisk 3,5 (about S500) stores a generous 800K. 
Used with the Apple lie Expansion Card and Quark's Cata- 
lyst 3.0. a mouse-driven program selector that juggles 
several programs on your desktop at once, the lie func- 
tions much like the Macintosh in terms of user interface. 

Weaknesses. The lie is high-priced compared with 
newer, more powerful competitors, and is often sold as a 
"bare bones" unit that you must configure yourself. For 
instance, you can expand the memory to 128K (and more, 
through third-party add-ons or the new Apple lie Expan- 
sion Card) and the video display to 80 columns, but these 
are extra — not standard — features. Even though the Apple 
n is known as a good game machine, its built-in sound 
capability is limited and its graphics arc tricky for pro- 
grammers. The keyboard has only two function keys, mak- 
ing some software difficult to use. 

Overall. A proven, though somewhat expensive, com- 
puter that's best for those wanting a large software base or 
for those hobbyists who want access to a wide range of 
specialized add-on cards. Truly a general- purpose comput- 
er — there's not much you can't do with a He. And Apple's 
new UniDisk, Expansion Card, and the software being 
designed to work with them should keep many existing lie 
owners from covetously eyeing new computers. 

APPLE He 

Strengths. The lie is a stylish, transportable, compact 
version of the lie — with extra memory ( 128K). built-in 80- 
column capability, built-in disk drive, and serial ports for 
a modem and a printer. It runs virtually 100 percent of the 
thousands of software packages that run on the lie. and 
some that the lie doesn't. Its built-in mouse/joystick port 
automatically figures out which device you have plugged 
in. The lie is most often sold with an attractive hl-res 
monochrome monitor that is good for applications requir- 
ing 80-character displays. In short, you get more for the 
money than with the He. The lie is easy to pick up (it has a 
handle) and has a nifty carrying case (S39) that makes it 
easy to move. Good tutorial disks (included with pur- 
chase) help novices get up and running very quickly. 

The new Apple Color Monitor lle/llc (it works with both 
and costs around S400-S450) can legibly display 80 char- 
acters of text. Thus, it's a true crossover monitor that can 
be used for education, entertainment, and business appli- 
cations. Used in conjunction with the new high-speed 
Imagewriter 11 color printer (about S600; compatible with 
the He and Macintosh), the lie can be a complete color 
solution. Most applications programs, such as 
AppleWorks, will work well with this system; others, such 
as pjs: Graph, are being redesigned to take full advantage 
of its features. 

Weaknesses. The lack of card slots makes further ex- 
pansion of the He difficult. And because of the nonstan- 
dard connections, you'll need special cables to connect 



NOVEMBER 1985 37 




non-Apple peripherals, such as modems. Since it has a 
serial printer port, you'll need a serial-to-parallel converter 
to connect a parallel printer. 

Overall. Well-designed, easy to use, and portable, 
the lie can be found at attractively priced deals, espe- 
cially when packaged with the lie monitor. While the lie 
has all the advantages of the lie (except expandability), it 
also has all the drawbacks of its old technology: It's com- 
paratively slow, and has limited disk-storage space and 
memory. Nonetheless, the He's ease of use makes it good 
for people who want "no fuss, no muss" computing. And 
Apple's new products for the lie give a once closed system 
greater versatility for home use. 



MACINTOSH 

Strengths. The Macintosh, which comes in 128K and 
512K ("Fat Mac") versions, Is a compact computer with a 
sophisticated operating system. The computer, high-reso- 
lution black-and-white monitor, and disk drive (3.5-inch) 
are contained in one unit; the keyboard is separate. Each 
Macintosh comes with a mouse instead of cursor-control 
keys. You control the cursor's movement on the screen 
and give most other commands to the computer by mov- 
ing the mouse over a flat surface and pressing its button. 
MacWrite. a word processor, and MacPaint, a fun-to-use 
and powerful graphics program, come packaged with the 
Macintosh. Most of the programs written for the Mac use 
"pull-down" menus, icons, and "windows," This common 
operating method, combined with the standard "point- 
and-click" approach of the mouse, makes learning pro- 
grams easier than on other systems. The range of sound 
output (four voices) is impressive, and the graphics are 
sharp. 

Weaknesses. The Macintosh is black-and-white only. 
This was not a liability until the Atari 520ST and Commo- 
dore Amiga, both with hi-res color, were introduced. De- 
spite its fast microprocessor, the 128K Macintosh can be 
slow and annoying to use with only one disk drive. Con- 
stant disk-swapping is less of a problem with the 512K 
"Fat Mac" or with an external drive — and the long-awaited 
Hard Disk 20 from Apple (about S2.000) should alleviate 
the disk-switching problem altogether. Since the keyboard 
has no cursor keys and only one function key, editing 
spreadsheets or text documents with the mouse can be 
slow. As with the lie, the nonstandard serial ports force 
the user to buy Apple peripherals, or go to extra expense 
for special cables. 

Overall. The Mac is an advanced and remarkably easy- 
to-use machine that has changed the way many users and 
software designers think about computers. The hi-res dis- 
play is easy on the eyes and capable of detailed graphics — 
excellent for drawing and typesetting applications. Using a 
mouse instead of the keyboard can be an advantage. With 
the new Hard Disk 20 and Apple's Switcher (S20)— a pro- 
gram that allows you to switch between several programs 



in the computer's memorj' — the Macintosh Is finally a true 
personal computer workstation. 



Last July, about one year after Jack Tramiel and other 
investors bought the "new" Atari Corp. from Warner Com- 
munications Inc., the long-awaited Atari 520ST started 
appearing in computer stores. It was the first visible mani- 
festation since Tramiel's buyout of his long-espoused 
"power-without-the-price" philosophy. [See "Atari 520ST: 
A Macintosh Jor the Millions?" in the October issue oj 
FAMILY COMPUTING.) Not to bc forgotten, the new Atari 
130XE (see "Some Call It Old Faithful" in the August 
issue), which arrived earlier in the year, is a welcome 
upgrade of the popular 800XL. 

Now that Atari's actually delivered the 520ST, its other 
promises have to be taken seriously. For instance. Atari 
has said it will market a 10-megabytc hard-disk drive for 
about S500, which is half the going price these days. And 
it has said it will market a compact disk drive for the new 
computer compact disks, also for about $500. Right now. 
such drives are scarce and cost around $2,000. But, be- 
fore these dreams become reality, the company has got to 
show that the ST is a reliable machine. 

130XE 

Strengths. The 130XE is yet another incarnation of 
the venerable 800 line, which was introduced in 1979. It 
has four-voice sound and the same video chip that's re- 
sponsible for Atari's unique graphics, and it runs a lot of 
software. Atari Home Computers have always been highly 
reliable, and great for general home use. 

The 130XE has I28K and, with the appropriate soft- 
ware, will allow you to keep longer files in memory. The 
keyboard has four liandy function keys — HELP, START. 
SELECT, and OPTION. Much software uses these keys to 
the user's advantage. 

Weaknesses. While the Atari 130XE still offers sound 
and graphics features not found elsewhere (such as the 
Apple II line), it is an old computer design. Thus, it doesn't 
match the performance of the newer computers from Atari 
and other manufacturers, and it only displays 40 charac- 
ters per line. While it has 128K available, virtually no new 
software takes advantage of this extra memory. Because 
developers have trained their sights on the new high- 
powered computers coming on the market, new software 
for the 130XE is likely to be limited. 

Overall. Few computers offer the reliability, graphics, 
and sound features of the Atari XE line. The 130XE offers 
all the features of the time-tested 800XL. plus 128K of 
memory and a slicker keyboard. Amateur and professional 
programmers alike love their Atarls, and wouldn't trade 
them for all the Apples in Silicon Valley. For the price it's 
selling at now. you almost can't go wrong. But it's not a 
computer that will give you the longest growth paths. 



38 FAMiLV COMPUTING 




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ATARI 5205T 

Strengths. The 520ST is powerful and inexpensive, as 
promised. With its 512K, high-resolution screen display, 
and mouse-operating environment, it's hard not to com- 
pare the ST with the black-and-white Macintosh. How- 
ever, the ST is also capable of displaying up to 512 colors 
on an RGB monitor, making it potentially more versatile. 
The ST comes ready for action, with a serial port (for a 
modem), a parallel port (for a printer], MIDI (Musical Inter- 
face Device] in and out ports (for connecting svTithesizers 
and electronic instruments), and a connection for a mono- 
chrome or RGB monitor. It also has two joysiick/mouse 
ports, and a port to connect a hard disk drive, which 
makes it the first computer with such a port built in. The 
keyboard has 10 function keys, and cursor keys, which 
can be used in place of the mouse if desired. The GEM 
(Graphics Environment Manager) desktop environment, 
which comes on a disk and allows programs to run with 
pull-down menus and windows, makes the ST easy to use 
and new programs relatively easy to learn. The DR Logo 
programming language, which comes on disk with pur- 
chase (another first in the industry!), takes full advantage 
of the GEM environment. 

Weaknesses, Right now, there is little 520ST software 
on the market, though many developers have programs in 
progress. The inclusion of Logo rather than BASIC with 
the machine seriously limits the kinds of programs that 
you can write yourself (or type in from a magazine). And. 
while Atari says that 90 percent of all software written for 
the computer will work with both monochrome and color 
monitors, some developers say that software written to 
work with one monitor will not look very good on the 
other. All computers have their Achilles' heels — this could 
be the Atari's. Another drawback is the size of the system; 
it sprawls across a desk. 

Overall. You get a lot for your money with the ST. 
However, the ST is beautiful, but impractical. The taming 
of a computer can be measured by the amount of good, 
useful software that takes advantage of the system's pow- 
er. Right now, all we can do is wait. 



COMMODORIBIISINESS MACHINES 



Commodore is looking for a product that will replace the 
successful Commodore 64. once the best-selling micro- 
computer in the world. Last year, it tried the Plus/4 and 
Commodore 16, which didn't fill the 64's shoes and have 
been pretty much discontinued. Earlier this year, it 
brought out the Commodore 128, an upgraded C 64 that 
also runs some CP/M software. And, recently, it intro- 
duced the Amiga, which is cut from a different cloth alto- 
gether (see review in this iSBue). These two new comput- 
ers, along with a new management team headed by Presi- 
dent Thomas Rattigan (an ex-Pepsi executive), give Com- 
modore a shot at recapturing the momentum it had in the 



early 1980s. 

The company still considers itself the "king of mass- 
merchandisers," committed to selling powerful computers 
at affordable prices. However, it's trying to build up a new 
dealer network of computer specialty stores to carry the 
high-powered Amiga. 

Meanwhile, at presstime. Commodore 128s were scarce 
in the stores, and the new disk drive was missing entirely. 



COMMODORE 64 

Strengths. Though sales are finally slowing, the C 64 
has been a dynamic best-seller for two years. The selection 
and availability of software for the C 64 are the best of any 
computer in its price range. Cartridge software, particu- 
larly easy for youngsters to use, is readily available. For 
music lovers, the three-voice synthesizer chip (SID) is a 
big plus, Piano-style keyboards and clever music-composi- 
tion software take full advantage of the chip, A wide array 
of low-cost and reliable peripherals are available, from 
modems to touch tablets to speech synthesizers. Because 
of the large number of owners, support from magazines, 
users' groups, and Commodore is easy to come by. 

Weaknesses. You must resort to peeks and pokes or 
buy additional software in order to take advantage of some 
features. The 1541 disk drive is ver\' slow, although a 
variety of "fast-load" devices Improve drive speed consider- 
ably. Also, unlike most systems, the drive is not capable of 
"self-booting" software, You must type a load command to 
begin a program. Reliability has been a problem with the 
C 64 from the start, with an unusually high failure rate 
out-of-the-box. The ports are nonstandard, so you need 
special cables to connect non-Commodore peripherals. 
And the screen display is only 40 characters wide. 

Overall. The C 64 is a good computer, but it can be 
difiicult to use. It's adequate for home use (in fact, in 
many ways it's a classic "home computer"), especially if 
you use commercial software. Youngsters can have a lot of 
fun with the C 64. Because of its music synthesizer, any- 
one with a passing interest in music should consider it 
closely. But because of its unreliabllily and slow disk 
drive, it's not recommended for business use. 



COMMODORE 128 

Strengths. The C 128 is a Commodore 64 and a whole 
lot more (see "It's AC 64 and More ..." in the July issue). 
An expanded keyboard with a numeric keypad is the most 
obvious improvement. But changes under the hood are 
even more striking. The C 128 operates in three different 
modes. In C 64 mode, it uses all C 64 hardware (it has the 
same expansion ports) and software. That means you 
don't suffer the initial software shortage usually associat- 
ed with new computers. And, if you're upgrading from a 
C 64. you can still use the 1541 disk drive, as well as any 
printers and modems you own. 

In the C 128 mode, you have access to 128K of RAM, a 



NOVEMBER 1985 39 



brand-new BASIC 7.0 with more than 140 commands — 
including full support for all the graphic and sound capa- 
bilities of the machine — and a 40- or 80-column display 
(with Commodore's RGB monitor). There's also a built-in 
sprite editor (to create sprites) and a machine-language 
monitor, which can be a great help when programming in 
the Commodore's machine language. 

The third mode, which requires the new 1571 disk 
drive, is CP/M 3.0. This granddaddy of operating systems 
gives you access to thousands of programs (many public 
domain), and business-quality software (e.g., Wordstar 
and the Perfect series). The 1571 drive is doubie-sided, 
and disks can hold up to 41 OK of data. It can transfer data 
much faster than the 1541. 

Weaknesses. As with the Atari 130XE, there's little 
commercial software that takes advantage of the extra 
memory in C 128 mode. (Users who write their own pro- 
grams, of course, will have a field day.) While the disk 
drive is an improvement over the 1541, it wasn't available 
in stores at presstime; because it's required to run CP/M. 
this means that the option and all the business software it 
includes is a "promise." Besides the new disk drive, you 
need Commodore's RGB monitor to take full advantage of 
the C 128, and that. too. is in short supply. 

Qverall. The C 128 is the computer Commodore 
should have come out with last year, instead of the ill- 
fated Plus/4. In fact, it's the first time that Commodore 
has introduced a new computer that's completely compati- 
ble with an existing one. 

However, in the last year, a lot of new computers may 
have preempted the 128's place in the market. A full Com- 
modore 128 system— with 1902 REG monitor and 1571 
disk drive—costs about S900. At that price, the C 128 
probably makes sense primarily for Commodore 64 own- 
ers who have existing software and peripherals to use. 



[H3 

The giant of the computer industiy (and one of the most 
profitable companies in the world) is as strong in the 
business market (especially among Fortune 500 buyers) as 
Apple is in the schools. And, despite Its flirtation with the 
general consumer market, the business-oriented IBM PC 
line is still IBM's only real success in microcomputers (see 
reviews of the IBM PC and compatible computers in 
"Buyer's Guide to Business Systems" in October). 

In any case, IBM's expected to keep the PC/XT/AT line 
going, and to rethink the consumer market. Look for 
prices on the IBM PC to keep dropping, as IBM swings into 
gear with its high-powered PC AT, and keep the other eye 
peeled for a rumored new lower-priced computer for con- 
sumers. IBM has reportedly been testing such a computer 
in Japan, though the results are said to be not worth 
writing home about. 



u.!;i.iJ.<-i-iJin.u.rHiF.T.i'i 



Tandy/Radio Shack has been in the microcomputer 
market as long as anyone. The TRS-80 Model I was intro- 
duced in 1977, and for a while was the country's best- 
selling computer. It was followed by TRS-80 Models 11/111/4/ 
12/16, 100, and 200 (the briefcase-size lap-tops), and 6000 
and the Color Computers 1 and 2. 

In addition to the TRS-80 line, the company has a newer 
line under the "Tandy" name. The Tandy line, which is 
meant to shed Radio Shack's "techy" image and replace it 
with a more consumer-oriented one , includes the Tandy 
1000, 1200HD. and 20O0. And now, for the first time, 
Tandy Computer Centers stock third-party software. 

Of all these Tandy/Radio Shack computers, the two 
most viable for general-purpose home use are the low-cost 
Color Computer and the spritely Tandy 1000. The Model 
4, while reasonably priced for medium-level business ap- 



plications, has poor sound and no color. 

In most respects, Tandy differs from other computer 
manufacturers. It's not flashy, flamboyant, or prone to 
hype; it's somewhat staid and conservative — an IBM for 
the masses. It's not a price-cutter with screaming deals, 
and has no hi-tech wunderkinds who attract a lot of press. 
Tandy computers are decent products at decent prices, 
backed up by a massive nationwide dealer network. 



COtOR COMPUTER 2 

Strengths. Over the years, the "CoCo" has developed a 
solid following among home users. In the early days it was 
a hobbyist's machine, and that's resulted in a good selec- 
tion of software and add-ons, such as a mouse and graph- 
ics tablet, Most are available through Radio Shack stores, 
and others through third-party mail-order vendors. Al- 
though the CoCo comes in a lower-priced 16K RAM config- 
uration, you can do more with the 64K Extended BASIC 
version. Current owners cite the sophisticated OS-9 oper- 
ating system (optional) and the 6809 CPU chip as pro- 
grammer's delights. The CoCo is designed to be used with 
a television, obviating the need for a monitor. 

Weaknesses. Like a number of systems in this guide, 
the CoCo is graying around the edges. For about the same 
price, you can get other systems that offer more versatility 
and features. The limited uppercase-only, 32-character- 
by- 16-line display is a handicap if youVe planning any 
serious application, especially word processing. While it 
can be upgraded, it's an inconvenient nuisance in this day 
and age. 

Overall. In Its time, the CoCo was a strong contender. 
For those who own one, it's still a viable, well-supported 
computer. But it's 1985, and potential buyers should look 
carefully at the competition. Even Tandy is reportedly 
working on new upgraded versions of its venerable old 
CoCo. which may be ready early In 1986. 



TANDY 1000 

Strengths. Tandy claims the 1000 is the computer the 
IBM PCjr "should have been." It runs all IBM PC software, 
except for a handful of titles. Important business products 
such as Lotus J -2-3 and the pjs series will run on the 
1000. Like the PCjr, the 1000 has good color and sound 
capabilities, and some educational software has been writ- 
ten to take advantage of it. Features optional on the IBM 
PC that are standard on the 1000 include a parallel printer 
port, two joystick ports, color capability, and MS-DOS 
(disk operating system). The keyboard has 12 function 
keys and a numeric keypad, Tandy also sells an RGB 
monitor at a reasonable price (S429). 

An integrated software package called DesJcMate comes 
with the Tandy 1000. It includes spreadsheet, text-edit- 
ing, data base, and communications programs, and a 
calendar and calculator. While it's not as powerful as inte- 
grated software of the Framework or Symphony variety, 
for some users DeskMate may be all that's needed to make 
good use of the 1000. 

Weaknesses. The Tandy 1000 has only three expan- 
sion slots (compared with five in the IBM PC), and the 
system case is smaller than that of the IBM PC, so that it 
cannot accept all the same circuit boards. Thus, rather 
than having a world of third-party expansion products to 
choose from, you're often limited to Tandy expansion 
cards. Fortunately, Tandy has a number in the stores 

Overall. The Tandy 1000 Is well-designed and backed 
by a stable company, and may be a good choice for budget- 
conscious business buyers looking for IBM compatability. 
With its good color and sound, the 1000 also qualifies as a 
good computer if you've got kids in the house. The free 
DesJcMate software is adequate for general use. but is not 
a replacement for full-featured programs, S] 



40 FAMILY COMPUTING 



Holiday Helper 




SIT BACK 
AND RELAX 
WHILE YOUR 
COMPUTER 
PLANS 
THE MENU, 
DECKS 
THE HALLS, 
AND SPREADS 
GOOD CHEER 



BY 

MARLENE ANNE 

BUMCARNER 



The approaching holidays signal a whirl 
of festivities and the chance to spend 
precious moments with your family. Its 
a time for entertaining, sending Christmas 
cards, exchanging gifts, and keeping the kids 
happily occupied. One of the best resources to 
help you face the holidays (so you have time left 
over to enjoy them) is your computer. 

Combined with the right software. It can 
plan a party, handle lists, turn out the yearly 
letter to your relatives and friends, even keep 
the younger set busy working on fun. creative 
(and perhaps useful) holiday projects. Further, 
with a little ingenuity, the computer as "holi- 
day helper" can contribute to decorating your 
house, provide new ways of making gifts, and 
case menu-planning. Here's how; 

GETTING ORGANIZED 

Thanksgiving is arriving fast, and the win- 
ter holidays are just around the corner. Be- 
cause drawing up mailing lists, planning for 
parties, and arranging for houseguests often 
precede the actual holidays by several weeks, 
now is the time to boot up a word processor, 
spreadsheet, or data base and enlist your com- 



puter to help. Integrated programs or ones de- 
signed to work together, can be particularly 
useful since they allow you to switch easily 
among different programs you are using con- 
currently. 

List making. Instead of getting inundat- 
ed by little slips of paper or searching for last 
year's Christmas cards to update your address 
book, put your lists of party guests, gifts to 
buy. cards to send, or chores to do on a word 
processor or data base. On a word processor: 
Input your list and then use the cut and paste 
functions to alphabetize or arrange your en- 
tries into categories. On a data base: Enter 
each name and address in a separate file, then 
use the sort function to alphabetize or catego- 
rize (for example, by zip code). By saving your 
lists to disk, you can change and update them 
whenever you wish and print out fresh copies if 
you have a printer. The kids. too. can input 
their lists of what they want for Christmas, or 
who they want to get gifts for. 

Rachel and Mike Finley of Milwaukee. Wis- 
consin, for example, compile their address list 
of family and friends on a word processor. As 
address changes occur, they maintain and up- 



MARi.KNi; ANNE BUMG.M<NER 

is a regular conlributor 
of software reviews for 

FAMILY COMPLTINC. She IS 

coordinator of child 
development programs 
at Gavilan Community 
College in Gilroy, 
California. 



NOVEMBER 1985 41 



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date their list so it's complete when they're 
ready to send out greetings next year. 

Budgeting. The holidays usually are ex- 
pensive, especially if you're planning on throw- 
ing parties or putting up houseguests. Budget- 
ing to avoid a bleak January can actually be 
fun on a computer. A spreadsheet program wilt 
allow you to see the different results your dol- 
^lars can bring before you go to a store and put 
money on the counter. Input your various 
spending categories, such as the names of 
everyone you plan to buy gifts for, and then 
enter different price possibilities for each cate- 
gory. The spreadsheet will calculate your vari- 
ous total expenditures. 

DebDi Gregorio of Ridgewood, New Jersey, 
for instance, uses her spreadsheet to compare 
the cost effects of using different caterers and 
types of wines when throwing large parties. 
She finds it helps her decide which to use to 
stay within her budget. 

Developing schedules. As the calendar 
fills with year-end festivities, arranging for 
transportation and keeping track of all the nec- 
essary details can turn into a nightmare. Why 
not put each person's schedule on your word 
processor, update it as necessary, and print 
out copies for eveiyone? By the same token. 
use it to draw up rehearsal and performance 
calendars for any holiday theater or caroling 
groups you're involved with. For plays, the 
word processor can also come in handy if 
you're planning to adapt an original script. 
Type it in, make changes, and then print out 
clean copies for each cast member. Similarly, if 
you're rearranging parts for carolers, use mu- 
sic software to edit up to four voices, then print 
out songsheets for each singer. 

Some suggested software: Bank Street Mu- 
sic Writer by Mindscape for 48K Atari, C 64. 
$50; Better Working series by Spinnaker for 
48K-64K Apple, C 64, $50-660; Elite'Calc by 
Elite for 16K TRS-80 CoCo. S80; I Know It's 
Here Somewhere by Hayden Software for Mac- 
intosh, S59: and Team-Mate by Tri Micro for 
C 64. S49. 

SITTING DOWN TO WRITE 

Once you've completed your Christmas 
card and guest lists (or gotten them well under- 
way), the next step is to buckle down and get 
your missives into the mail. 

Creating cards and invitations. Add- 
ing the personal touch to your season's greet- 
ings can be turned into a family activity using 
printing software. Develop one design and 
print it out in quantity, or personalize each 
card, cither by creating individual designs, or 
by incorporating the receiver's name in the pat- 
tern. Use the preset pictures and shapes in- 
cluded, or dream up your ovm illustrations us- 
ing the freehand drawing facilities provided in 
many programs. 

The Ritchey family of Fullcrton. California, 
for example, use The Print Shop to make one- 
of-a-kind Christmas cards. John, 14, designs 



the cards, and then each one Is personalized 
before it's printed out. The Ritcheys use col- 
ored ribbons and paper to make each card 
unique. 

Composing the seasonal family let. 
ler. If your family prefers the tradition of a 
photocopied yearly letter, you'll find the com- 
puter can involve everyone in the writing. With 
a word processor designed with young children 
in mind, the kids can compose their own sec- 
tions while adults still have a full-fledged tool to 
work with. If you're using creative-printing 
software, you can illustrate the letter with pre- 
set shapes, or have each family member illus 
trate and print out a version. And if you need 
extra sheets to add a personal note, or if you're 
sending business greetings, use your computer 
to create a customized letterhead— and then 
adapt it for year-round use! 

Lois Gelzer. who lives on Martha's Vine- 
yard, just off the coast of Massachusetts, says 
that making individualized Christmas letters 
is one of the most efficient ways in which she's 
used her computer. "Most of what I want to say 
1 can .say to everyone; however, some things 
apply only to our family." she says. "Before 1 
had a word processor, UTiting Christmas let- 
ters was much more time-consuming." 

Sending hi-tech messages. The spirit of 
the season lends itself to communicating with 
loved ones in many ways. The computer can 
act as a new medium as well as a tool, by 
carrying messages on its screen or communi- 
cating ihcm over phone lines. With a package 
called Many Ways to Say I Love You. very 
young children can make colorful, electronic 
greeting cards that can be saved on disk. They 
design an animated picture with colored on- 
screen stickers, and then add in music and 
written messages. It's then placed in an on- 
screen graphic-display envelope to be "un- 
sealed" by the person they're "sending" it to at 
the touch of a key. 

If you and several friends or relatives have 
modems, you can relay electronic greeting 
cards or invitations right over the phone lines. 
The Finleys. for example, send greetings and 
announcements to a whole community of far- 
away friends by e-mail. If you want to send a 
picture card instead of words, you can even do 
that using WDTEX—either via CompuScn'e, or 
directly through the phone lines, to another 
comput(;r equipped with the same program. 

Some suggested software: Bank Street 
Writer by Broderbund for 64K Apple, 48K Atari, 
C 64. IBM PC/PCjr, S50-S8C: MacPublisher hy 
Boston Software for 128K Mac, SlOO; The 
Magic Slate by Sunburst for 48K-128K Apple, 
S69; Many Ways To Say I Love You by CBS 
Software for 48K Apple. C 64. S30: The News- 
room by Springboard for 64K Apple. S50; The 
Print Shop by Broderbund for 48K Apple, 48K 
Atari, C 64. 128K IBM PC/PC/r, 128K Mac. 
S44-S80; and VIDTEX by CompuServe for 48K 
Apple, C 64, 128K IBM, TRS-80 Model 111 & 
CoCo, 840^60. 



DECORATING 

Adding a touch of red and green on the 
doors, or a festive centerpiece on the table, can 
give the kids an incentive to show off their 
computer know-how. 

Hanging banners, signs, and Christ- 
mas tree decorations. Turn your computer 
into a printing press for making wall hangings 
and other decorations. Using special banner- 
making software or graphic programs that 
print out lettering, your children can create 
large vertical or horizontal signs proclaiming 
the season's greetings and little decorations to 
hang on the tree. Jazz them up with colored 
ribbons or fanfold paper (or both), or color in 
the letters after printing out the banners. 

Beautifying your tdble. Whether you're 
planning a small family get-together or a large 
"do." having a homemade centerpiece on the 
table and place-cards or personalized place- 
mats at each plate can add a special flavor. Use 
drawing and printing software to create color- 
ful creations freehand. Depending on the soft- 
ware. Its library of shapes may contain "tools" 
for drawing rectangles and circles. It may also 
include symbols for plates, cups, and flatware. 
and renditions of turkeys, fruits, and vegeta- 
bles. Glue, felt pens, and scissors can help 
complete the masterpiece. 

Some suggested software: Dazzle Draw by 
Broderbund for 128K Apple, S60: FontriA- by 
Data Transforms for 48K Apple, 256K IBM PC/ 
PCjr. $95-8155 (S25 for additional data disks); 
Designer's Pencil by Activision for 48K Apple. 
48K Atari, C 64. 128K IBM PC/PC/r, S25-S40; 
The Print Shop {see above): and ZBANNER + 
and ZCARD by ZAZDA for 64K IBM PC/PCjr, 
S50 each. 

GIFT-CIVING 

The nicest gifts contain something of the 
giver. There is software that especially lends 
itself to the creative spirit of the very young, 
the very old . . . and all ages in between. 

Giving stories or plays as treasured 
momentes. Creative writing in various forms 
can make c.vcellent gifts. Younger children can 
use software that asks them simple questions 
and then develops their answers into imagina- 
tive stories. Older children can use a general 
word processor or software that, apart from 
text-handling, has libraries of pictures to 
choose from and graphics tools for drawing 
original illustrations. 

Erin Panntaja, 10, of Morgan HlU, Califor- 
nia, for example, first researched the activities 
of the pilgrims at Plymouth Rock. Then, with 
several classmates, she wrote a Thanksgiving 
play on her family's word processor. 

Making practical gifts. If a useful gift is 
more your style, make T-shirts with Prince, a 
new program that enables you to print out 
graphics and lettering on cloth and other mate- 
rials. Or use Patchworks, also new, to design 
whimsical, kaleidoscope-like patterns you can 
print out in color for cards or wrapping paper. 



You can also use Patchworks to create patterns 
for quilt-making or embroidery work. 

Some suggested software: Build A Book 
About You by Scarborough for 48K Apple, C 64, 
64K IBM PC/PCjr, S40; Kid Pro Quo by Softsync 
for C 64. S29: Pa(chuJor/cs by Random House 
for Apple, S60: Prince by Baudville for 48K Ap- 
ple. 870; and Story Maker: A Fact and Fiction 
Tool Kit by Scholastic for 48K Apple, 839. 

ENTERTAINING 

As your home fills with the bustle of 
guests, children's merriment, and the smell of 
festive cooking, making sure everyone's enjoy- 
ing themselves (while getting everything done) 
becomes a feat in itself. 

Keeping the children involved and 
happy. If the kids seem restless, boot up a 
printing program and challenge them to turn 
out a holiday newsletter. If the project goes 
well, it could be turned into a year-round ga- 
zette. Or, let them try movie-making with ani- 
mation software. Another software package 
that's a natural when several children get to- 
gether is Mask Parade. By selecting eyes, ears, 
noses, and hair from the menus, children can 
design their own masks and print them out. 
Felt pens, crayons, scissors, and contact paper 
arc all that's needed to turn the kids into ac- 
tors, squealing at each other's bizarre features. 

Composing accompaniment or back- 
ground music. Your computer can help keep 
carolers on key or provide interesting back- 
ground music for entertaining. Bob Eltgroth of 
Morgan Hill, California, created a medley of 
holiday tunes using Bank Street Music Writer 
that provided an hour of background music for 
one of his holiday parties. He typed in the notes 
of several songs, and then, using an editor 
facility, adapted the meter and key until he 
liked the results. The Gelzers of Martha's Vine- 
yard chose Handel's "Hallelujah Chorus," 
which they arranged in four parts on their 
Atari. 

Planning menus and shopping lists. 
As your holiday grocerj' list stretches on for 
pages, your computer can be an invaluable 
help. Cooking software offers data bases filled 
with recipes and menu suggestions. You canii 
enter your own recipes, and, in some cases, 
commentary (such as. "Uncle Ben likes this."). 
Since they are data bases, you can search for 
specific ingredients or food categories. If you 
plan all your meals at one time, some software 
allows you to print out a shopping list contain- 
ing ingredients for all the dishes you've selected. 

Some suggested software: Bank Street Mu- 
sic Writer [see above): Chocolate Bytes by The 
Software Toolworks for 128K IBM PC/PCjr, S30; 
The Diskette Cookbook Series by Vanilla Soft- 
ware for 128K IBM PC/PCjr. 840: Mask Parade 
by Springboard for 48K Apple, C 64, 64K IBM 
PC/PCjr, 840; Music Construction Set by Elec- 
tronic Arts for 48K Apple, 48K Atari, C 64, 
128K IBM PC/PCjr, S23-S40; VideoWorks by 
Hayden for 128K Mac, SI 00. Bl 



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Word Processors: 
NeiMf Tools for 
An Age-Old 
Task 



WHATEVER 

YOUR 

NEEDS, 

THERE'S 

A 

PROGRAM 

TO 

AAATCH 



ROHIN RASKIN. Q FAMILY 

coMrirrmc contributing 
editor, wrote this 
month's Telecomputing 
and Home/Money 
Management colnmns. 

44 FAM11.V COMPUTING 



BY ROBIN RASKIN 



A word-processing program has a lot in 
common with a self-correcting elec- 
tric typewriter and even that ol' No. 2 
pencil. You can use any of these instruments to 
write letters to grandma, develop term papers, 
or type lengthy business reports. Word-pro- 
cessing software, however, will help you get the 
job done more efficiently. 

A word processor is basically a program that 
lets you write and edit lexl which can be saved 
and printed out. Best of all. it allows you to 
make small changes in the text without rewrit- 
ing the whole page. 

Your family's work— whether an eighth-grade 
science report, a master's thesis or the compa- 
ny's annual report — will look more professional 
on word-processing software, without devoting 
hours of extra time. 

Word-processing programs have come a long 
way since the first package was created in 
1980. Today, they offer dozens of features. You 
can choose from word processors with pull- 
down windows. 12 different type fonts, a per- 
sonalized "notepad." and 75 prcconfigured 
printer formats. Sound like a dream? In reali- 
ty, it could be a nightmare if you end up pur- 
chasing a program with lots of pizzazz and no 
power. On the other hand, you may not need a 
very powerful program. You probably wouldn't 
buy a Cadillac to drive to the grocery store a 
half-mile away. Similarly, you shouldn't spend 
S300 on a super-deluxe word-processing pro- 
gram if your writing tasks don't extend beyond 
brief correspondence. 

So what software shoiild you buy? Before 
you can answer that, you'll need to ask yourself 
a few questions. Who will be using the pro- 
gram — you alone or other family members? 
What will the program be used for? To type 
term papers? Mailing lists? Long reports? How 
experienced are you on the computer? And 
how much are you willing (o spend? 

Now you're ready to narrow your selection 
and begin your research. Use our chart as 
starting ground. If you find a program that 
seems to suit your needs, take the research a 




step further. Find a friend who has the pro- 
gram and borrow it for a few days. Or, at the 
very least, ask your local software dealer for a 
demonstration. For the most part, you'll find 
there arc very few bad word-processing pro- 
grams. And there are some that will strike a 
responsive chord, answering your personal 
style and needs. 

CHARTING YOUR COURSE 

The accompanying chart was designed as an 
easy reference to popular word-processing pro- 
grams for both novices and sophisticated us- 
ers. The packages were reviewed by regular 
contributors who looked at software for the 
computers they know best: Francis Amato on 
Commodore, Karla Fisk on Radio Shack, and 
Gvven Solomon on Apple computers. I reviewed 
software for the Atari, IBM, and Macintosh. 

Quite a few of the programs we have listed 
are available for more than one machine: how- 
ever, we've tried to include the version that 
best takes advantage of a particular machine's 
capabilities. Following is a brief summary of 
features we reviewed for each program — you 
should keep them in mind when you begin the 
search for your ideal word-processing program. 

Method of Operation. Most word proces- 
sors use menu- or command-driven systems. 
Many use a combination. Still another set uses 
icons, or graphic symbols. (For example, a fil- 
ing cabinet might mean stork or save.) Menu- 
driven programs let the user choose an action 
from a list, or menu, of available functions. 
Command-driven programs are controlled by 
combinations of keystrokes. (In Word Juggler. 
for instance, you use CONTROL-S to move the 
cursor to the left edge of the screen or to the 
start of a line of text.) 

Menus require little memorization, but tend 
to be slow. Commands require more memoriza- 
tion, but arc usually accompanied by on-screen 
help. For a novice, menus are a godsend: a 
good word processor however (one that your 
family can grow with), will usually employ ways 
to speed up menu selection. HomeWord. for 

ILtUSTKATIOSS; BtTT.lrAV.V AHCHfVE 



example, lets you turn off the icons, and you 
can bypass pop-up menus on Perfect Writer. 

Regardless of how it operates, the word pro- 
cessor should be logically and mnemonically 
organized. For example, all print commands 
should be located within the same menu, and 
commands like CONTROL-P should represent a 
print, not a save command. Seldom-used com- 
mands should be "tucked away" so they don't 
distract from the writing process. 

Display Capabilities. Otherwise known as 
"what you see is what you get. " Most word 
processors let you enter print preview mode 
where you'll get a screen display representing 
the final printed page (with margins, page 
breaks, etc.). The most sophisticated programs 
give you a final representation on-screen while 
writing. They will format as you t\'pc (or when 
you issue a format command), displaying bold- 
face, underline, tabs, and sometimes even 
fonts and point sizes. For example, if 1 under- 
line a word, it appears that way on my screen. 
If I alter margins, the document immediately 
reforms to the specified width. 

If you're the editor of a newsletter, or run a 
word-processing business and deal with form 
letters and resumes, you'll want the best dis- 
play capabilities you can get. 

Text Entry/Editing: In the early days of 
word processing, all programs were mode-ori- 
ented. Either you were creating or editing text. 
and there were different sets of commands for 
each function. Most software today lets you 
write and edit simultaneously. 

There are exceptions, however. For example, 
with Bank Street Writer, you can erase or enter 
text in the writing mode, but you must enter 
edit mode to do any find, insert or block move 
operations. Many educators believe this struc- 
ture, which separates writing and editing 
tasks, is especially helpful for children just 
learning to write. On the other hand, adults 
generally view the task separation as a time- 
consuming obstacle. 

Most programs today also feature "block op- 
erations," which means you can manipulate 
fairly large amounts of text by marking a spe- 
cific section and indicating which operation 
(move, copy, or delete) you want completed. 
Some software, like Bank Street Writer, have 
line limits for block functions. Powerful pro- 
grams have no limits. In addition, more ad- 
vanced software has extensive "local editing" 




THE 
TERMINOLOGY 

Chain Printing: Gives you the abilily to com- 
mand your computer to print several files (stored 
on disk or tape) in succession so they appear to be 
one large document when printed out. 

Horizontol Scroiiingi Lets you view more 

characters than your word-processing program 
and monitor are set up to display. For example, if 
your text Is 120 characters wide but the program 
is set up for 80-coiumn display, move the cursor 
right, past the 80lh column of your text. Addi- 
tional characters will come into view while the 
characters on the left disappear into the left side 
of the screen. 

Proportional Spacing: Produces profession- 
al-looking, typesetter-quality printouts. leather 
tiian allutling tlic same amount of space for each 
letter, proportional spacing prints an "m" wider 
than a "k." and a "k" wider than an "1." 

Search ond Replace: Finds a specific word or 
phrase, and (at the option of the user) replaces it 
with another. This feature is useful for correcting 
spelling errors or for replacing abbreviations with 
full terms. The se.^rch function alone Is useful for 
finding a specific section in a long document. 

Split Screen (aka Windows): Divides screen 
so you can view at least two different portions of 
one document or different liles at the same time. 



Some popular word-pro- 
cessing programs and 
their Jeatures: Textra's 
disJc-based tu(oriai. 
Word Juggier'^s spelling 
checker, and Mouse- 
Write'.s pull-down wln- 
do It's. 




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NOVEMBER 1985 45 



ASAMI 

J" 


»LER OF WORD-PR 





CESSING PROGRAMS FOR THE NOVICE AND THE PRO 

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APPLE 




















Apple Writer 11/ 
$149 


Apple 

Computer, Inc. 
(408)966-1010 


64K Apple 

He. lie 


K 


Y 140-coI, 
optional) 


Y 


Y 


G 


Command- 
driven 


Y (1.024- 
char. 
limltl 


Word, 
paragraph 


Y 
fgloba!) 


Insert 


Y 


G 


E 


E 




Bank Slrret 
Wrlier/S70 


Broderbund 
Software 
(4151 479-1 170 


64K App(e 


Y 


Y 140-eol. 
optional) 


N 


N 


G 


Menu- 
driven 


YdSllne 
limtil 


Word, line, 
paragraph 


Y 


Inserl 


Y 


E 


G 


G 


Betler 

Working: 

Word 

Processor/S60 


Spinnaker 
Software Corp. 
(6171 494-1200 


4eK Apple 


Y 


Y (40-col. 
optional) 


N 


N 


G 


Menu- 
driven and 
imbedded 

commands 


Y (255- 
char. 
limit) 


Character 
only 


Y 
(global) 


Irtsert 


Y 


A 


G 


G 


Homeword/ 
870 


Sierra Gn-Llne 
(2091 683-6858 


64K Apple 


Y 


N (70-co[. (n 

preview 
nmde only) 


N 


N 


G 


Command- 
driven and 
icons 


Y 


Word, line 


Y 
(global 1 


Insert 


Y 


G 


E 


E 


Magic Slalc/ 
S90 


Sunburst 
Commun!- 
callons 
(800)431-6616 


48K Apple: 
128K for 80- 
columns 


K 


Y (20,40- 

and 80-coI. 

versions) 


Y 


YdnSO- 

col. 

mode] 


E 


MenU' and 
command* 
driven 


Y 


Word, 

sentence. 

paragraph 


Y 


Overstrike 


Y 


E 


E 


E 


MouseWriUV 
$125 


Roger Wagner 
PuBlishlnS Inc. 
16191 562-3670 


12aK Apple 
lie 1 en- 
hanced). IIc 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


G 


Menu- and 
command- 
driven 


Y 


Word 


Y 


Overs irike 


Y 


E 


E 


G 


Pcrrect Writer 
Version 2.0/ 
SI39 


THORN EMI 
<7!4) 261-6600 


Apple 64K 


N 


Y 


N 


Y 


G 


Menu- 
driven 


Y 


Word, line, 

sentence, 

paragraph 


Y 
(global) 


Insert 


Y 


G 


E 


G 


PFS:Wrlte/ 
SI 25 


Software 
Publishing Co. 
(415)962-8910 


64K Apple 
l(e/(lc. 80- 
col. card 


Y 


Y 


N 


N 


G 


Menu- and 
command- 
driven 


Y 


Word, line 


Y 
lg(otaa!) 


0\-erstrlkc 


Y 


E 


E 


G 


Word Juggler/ 
S99 


Quark, Inc. 
(3031934-2211 


64K Apple 

Ile/IIc 


K 


Y (40-col. 
optional! 


Y 


N 


G 


Menu- and 
command- 
driven 


Y 


Word, line, 
paragraph 


Y 


Insert 


Y 


G 


G 


G 


The Wriie 
Choice/S45 


Roger Wagner 
Publishing Inc. 
16191562-3670 


48K Apple 


Y 


Y (40-col. 
optional) 


N 


N 


G 


Commajid- 
drlven 


Y 


Line 


Y 
(global) 


Overslrlke 


N 


N/A 


G 


G 


ATARI 




















Letter Perfcciy 
SlOO 


LJK 

Enterprises 
13141 962-1855 


32K Atari 


N 


Y (40-col. 
optional) 


N 


N 


A 


Menu- and 
command- 
driven 


Y 

(300-llne 
limltl 


Word. hne. 

paragraph 


y 

(globall 


Overstrike 


Y 


G 


E 


E 




PaperCUp/ 
S60 


iJattcrlL-3 
Included 
14161881-9941 


4BK Atari 
130XE 


Y 


N 140-col. 1 


Y 


Y 


E 


Command- 
driven 
{partially 
menu- 
driven 1 


Y 

125-line 

limit) 


Word, line 


Y 
Igloball 


Ovcretrike 


Y 


C 


E 


E 




Homeword/ 
S50 


Sierra On-I,lnc 
12091 683-6858 


48K Atari 


Y 


N(40.col.) 


N 


N 


A 


Command- 
driven and 
icons 


Y 


Word, line 


Y 

(globall 


Overstrike 


Y 


G 


A 


E 




Super-Text 
Professional/ 

S80 


Muse Software 
(3011659-7212 


48K Atari 
400/800/ 
1200XL 


Y 


N (40-col. 1 


N 

(preview 

model 


Y 


A 


Command- 
driven 


Y 


Word, line 


Y 
lg(oball 


Insert 


Y 


A 


A 


E 




COMMODORE 




















Belter 

Working: Word 
Proccssor/S50 


Spinnaker 
Software Corp. 
16171 494-1200 


C64 


Y 


Y (40-col. 
opllonall 


Y 


N 


A 


Menu- 
driven 


Y (255- 
char. 
limit) 


Word. 

sentence, 

paragraph 


Y 
(global) 


Itisert 


Y 


G 


P 


A 




Creallve 

Writer/ 

S50 


Creative 
Software 
(408)745-1655 


C64 


N 


N (40-col.; 

80col. In 

preview 

mode onlv) 


N 


N 


A 


Menu- and 
command- 
driven 


Y 


Word, 

sentence, 

paragraph 


N 


Overslrlke 


N 


N/A 


A 


A 




Fleet System 2/ 
S80 


Professional 
Software. Inc. 
(800) 343-4074 


C64 


Y 


N (available 
In preview 
mode onlv) 


Y 


Y 


A 


Command- 
driven 


Y 


Word, 

sentence, 

paragraph 


Y 

(globall 


Overstrike 


Y 


A 


P 


P 




Word 
Processor 
Profess lonal'SSO 


Mirage 
Concepts 
(209) 227-8369 


C64 


Y 


Y (40.colii[nn 
opllonall 


N 


N 


A 


Menu- 
driven 


Y 


Word. 

sentence. 

paragraph 


Y 

(g[obal| 


Insert 


N 


N/A 


E 


G 




IBM 




















Bank Street 
Writer/S80 


Broderbund 
Software 
(415) 479-1170 


64K IBM PO 

PCjr/XT 


Y 


Y 


N 


N 


G 


Menu- 
driven 


Y (15-line 
limit) 


Word, line 


Y 


Insert 


Y 


G 


A 


G 




Executive 
Wrlter/970 


Paperback 
Software 
(4151 644-21 16 


128KIBM 
PC. 256K 
PC/r 


N 


Y 


Y 


N 


G 


Menu- and 
command- 
driven 


Y 


Word. line. 

sentence. 

paragraph 


Y 

(globall 


0\'erstrike 
or insert 


Y 


E 


E 


E 




Just Write/ 
S145 


Mullimalc 

International 

(2031522-2116 


128K IBM 
PC. PCjr. PC 
XTw/DOS 

2.0 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


G 


Menu- and 
command- 
driven 


Y 


Word, line, 

sentence. 

paragraph 


Y 
(global) 


Overstrike 


Y 


E 


G 


E 




Perfect Writer/ 
S199 


THORN EMI 
(714) 261-6600 


128K IBM 
PC 


Y 


Y 


Y 


Y 


E 


Menu- 
driven 


Y 


Word, sen- 
lence. line, 
paragraph 


Y 

(g(oball 


Insert 


Y 


G 


E 


E 




Wordvlslori/ 
S50 


Bruce & James 
Program 
Publishing. Inc. 
(4! 5) 775-8400 


96K IBM PC 


N 


Y 


Y 


N 


G 


Menu- and 
command- 
driven, and 
icons 


Y 


Word, scn- 
(ence, line, 
paragraph 


Y 

Igloball 


Insert (no 
ovcrstrikel 


Y 


A 


E 


E 




Textra Vers.- 
3.1A/S25 
IS15 for 
upgrade 1 


Ann Arbor 
Software 
(313) 769- 
9088 


256K IBM 

PC/PCjr/AT/ 

XT 


Y 


Y 


Y 


N 


E 


Menu- and 
command- 
driven 


Y 


^Vord 


Y 
(globall 


Iiiserl 


Y 


A 


E 


E 




TANDY RADIO Sh 


lACK 


















•Allwrltc/ 
$200 


ProsofI 

(2131764-3131 


TRS-80 

Models I/III/4 


Y 


Y 164-co!. on 
Models I/III) 


Y 


N 




Menu- and 
command- 
driven 


Y 


Word, line. 

sentence. 

paragraph 


Y 


Overslrlke 


Y 










Telewrlter-64/ 
S50-660 


Cognitec 
(619)755-1258 


TRS-80 
CoCo 


Y 


Y151,64, 
851 


N 


N 


A 


Menu- 
driven 


Y 


Line, 
paragraph 


Y 
(globall 


Inserl 


Y 


N/A 


A 


A 





46 FAMILY COMPUTING 



KIT: E Excellent: C Good: A Average: P Poor: T Yes: N No: N/A Not applicable. 



10 

(expand- 

ablfl 



Both 



Doth 



V(2) 



Y 
[manual) 



For home, office, 
and pro writers 



A sophisltcated program lliat's easy to 
use. Has macro capaljility. 



5 

(cxpand- 

ablel 



Botii 



Headers 
onlv 



Y(dtsk) 



For entire 
farsilly. especially 
vuunti children 



Other packages arc available lo tsse with 
it (.such as story (>eneratorl. On screen 
calculator Willi' 128K. 



10 

(expand- 
able) 



Both 



Both 



Y(ia) 



Y 

(manual) 



For home or 

small business 



Versatile and easy to use. Has spelling 
checker, word counter, and macros. 



6 (expand- 
able) 



Doth 



Both 



YO) 



Y(tape) 



For entire 
ramily. especially 
young children 
(or novices) 



User-friendly. Icons make the program 
especially easy (or kids. As user becomes 
familiar with program, can use 
command-driven funclions Instead of 
Icons. 



20 
(expand- 
able) 



Both 



Both 



N (always 

In preview 

mode) 



Y 

(manual) 



For entire family 



Includes macros, and choice of various 
t>pe styles. Comprehensive and easy fo 
use with outstanding value and 
performance. 



18 



N (always 

in preview 

mode) 



Y(81 



Y 

imanual) 



For home 



Can be used with key Input alone, but 
key feature of program Is use of the Apple 
mouse. 



25 



Both 



Both 



YI20) 



Y(dlsk 

and 
manual) 



For serious 
writer or 
business use 



Sophisticated word processor. Includes 
footnotes, spelling checker, thesaurus, 
index, and table of contents. 



4 

lexpand- 

able) 



Both 



Both 



N (always 

in preview 

mode) 



Y 

(manual) 



For school, 
home, and 
business 



An excellent general-purpose word 
processor wUh word counter. 



8 (expand- 
able! 



Both 



Both 



Y(30) 



Y (disk 

and 
manual) 



For professional 
use 



Includes footnotes and spelling checker. 
Telecommunications capabilities and 
macros. Works with PFS: File and 
Quickfile. 



Both 



Y(8) 



Y 

(manua)) 



For home and 
school 



Easy to use. Includes high-res graphics. 
i\plng tutor, and footnotes feature. 



7.5 



Both 



Doth 



Y(15) 



Y 

(disk and 
manual) 



For home and 
school 



Used in conjunction with Data Perfect 
and Spell Perfect, it's a powerful program. 
Also has a word coimter. 



58 
icxpand- 

ablel 



Both 



Doth 



Seml- 
propor- 
tional 



YI25I 



Y 
(manuall 



For college 
students, small 
business and 
home users 



Recommended for anyone who wants to 
mail merge, incorporate graphics in 
documents, and use advanced printer- 
formatting. Has word counter, macros. 
Improved \'crslQn ^or 13QXE. 



Both 



Both 



Y|21 



Y (tape) 



For entire family 



ic6ns espcciallv good for the young or 
novices, A package you can grow with, 
Wot fast, but it's fairly txm-crful, 



Both 



Both 



YI7) 



Y 
(manual) 



For the frequent 
word-processor 



A tot of commands, and a complex 
structure. Has a word counter, macros. 
and telecommunications capabilities. 



iO 



4,5 



4,5 



Both 



Both 



Both 



Both 



Both 



Both 



Both 



Both 



N (always 
In preview 



YdU 



Y(2) 



Y(24) 



Y(l| 



Y 

(manual) 



V (disk 

and 
manual) 



Y 
(manual) 



Imanual) 



Y Y A 



For grade-school 
on up 



Good for entire 
family 



For Inter- 
mediate and 
business users 



For business, 
high school, or 
college students 



Power without complexity. Has a spelling 
checker, word counter, macros, and a 
scratch pad for making notes to yourself. 



Simple to use and easy to understand. 
Doesn't require mueh'effort to learn. 



Includes a spelling checker and word 
counter. Has macros but not very easy to 
use. 



Easv to use. but not easy to learn. Well- 
suited for merging dala-base Info into 
form letters. Has spelling checker, 



90 
(expand- 
able! 



199 



Expand- 
able 



45 
(expand- 
able) 



30 



Both 



Both 



Both 



Both 



Bolh 



Both 



Headers 
only 



Both 



Both 



Bolh 



Both 



Bolh 



N (always 

In preview 

mode) 



Y 



Y(17l, 

one 
default 



Yla) 



Y(38) 

yTsV 



Y (disk) 



Y 

(manua)) 



Y 
(manuall 



Y (disk 

and 
manual) 



Y (disk 

and 
manual] 



For entire 
family, especially 
young children 



For novice lo 
pro: student or 
business user 



Home use only 



For small- 
business user 



For beginners 



For htgh-school 
or college 
students 



Packs power Into simple menu format. 
Structured approach good for children 
just learning to write. 



Ability to do footnotes, incorporate 
graphics, and link setup sheets to 
another document. 



A scaled-down version of Afu/tiAfafe. Easy 
to learn and use. Good for casual home 
use. 



Best for those interested in Integrated 
approach. 



Manual and program are very visual. 
with online help. Good for those taking 
their first plunge. 



A program you can grow with. Easy to 
use with well-designed menus. Powerful 
and fast. 



10-15 

(expand- 
able) 



Bolh 



Both 



Both 



Doth 



Y (220) 



YI3I 



Y 

(manual) 



Yldisk 

and 
manual) 



For college 
students and 
business users 



For entire family 



Powerful, comprehensive package. Has 
footnotes and Indexing functions. 



One of ihe besl programs for the CoCo. 



•Not available for review. 



NOVEMBER 1985 47 




IF A WORD 

PROCESSOR 

DOESN'T FEEL 

RIGHT FOR YOU, 

NO LIST OF 

FEATURES CAN 

COMPENSATE. 



features that let you change more than one 
character at a time. For example, Creat'we 
Writer lets you edit by character, word, line, 
and sentence, using only a few keystrokes. Lo- 
cal editing is extremely helpful in polishing 
your text. 

File Handling: A word-processing pro- 
grams file-handting capabilities should be 
evaluated based on ease of use, as well as on 
the following: 1. Can you initialize or format a 
new data disk from within the word-processing 
program? 2. Can you check which flies are 
stored on your data disk? 3. is it easy to re- 
name and delete files? A good word processor 
will let you do all of these things, saving you 
much time and aggravation. Also, consider 
how the program handles potential errors. Are 
you prevented from accidently wiping out an 
entire file if you try to save another file under 
the same name? Does the program keep you 
from quitting if the current document hasn't 
been saved? 

The software's storage capacity is also crucial 
to the ease with which you can handle flies. (In 
the chart, we've shown the program's file ca- 
pacity in single-spaced pages.) If you're writing 
a book, thesis, or fairly lengthy term paper, 
large file capacity is important. With most word 
processors, you also have the option to "cut 
and paste." This allows you to break large doc- 
uments into smaller ones and merge them. 
Some programs merge files on the display 
screen, while others do it during printing. 
Jumping back and forth can be a real nuisance 
if the word processor doesn't simplify the pro- 
cess. (See "Ease of Use" column in chart on 
previous page. ) 
Printer Functions: Page numbering, head- 



ers/footers (descriptive titles that appear 
throughout a document), and boldface/under- 
line features are offered in most recent pro- 
grams. (There are a few exceptions noted in the 
chart.) Some software is more extensive than 
others. For example. PaperClip lets you specify 
the page you'd like to start numbering on. And 
Super-Text Professional has no line limit for 
headers and footers, while other programs al- 
low only one line. 

Be forewarned, though: Many of your print- 
ing features will depend on the capabilities of 
your printer as well as your word processor. 

Documentation: Many of the better word- 
processing packages offer disk-based instruc- 
tion and/or sample documents. Some include 
tutorials in the manuals. Still others, like 
HomeWord. have audio tapes. You'll find the 
medium of instruction far less important than 
the information actually provided. A manual 
should have an index, and should also be able 
to serve as an easy-to-access reference guide 
once you're done with the initial learning pro- 
cess. 

SUPER FEATURES 

Super features are attractive enticements, 
but few people will need or use every one. Foot- 
notes, spelling checkers, indexes, and 
word counters most quickly come to mind. For 
a college student, these added attractions may 
be the answer to end-of-year term paper trau- 
ma. On the other hand, for a fiction writer, 
they may be nothing more than expensive 
frills. 

Macros, too, are not for everyone. Macros are 
miniprograms, of a sort. They are used to im- 
plement commands that generally require sev- 
eral keystrokes. They can also be assigned for 
commonly used expressions. People who do a 
lot of business letter-writing often use macros. 
For offlce work, you might set up a macro for a 
particular form letter, or perhaps for the often- 
used salutation "Dear Sir." If you're using Ap- 
ple Writer 11. for example, you can set up mac- 
ros so all you need to do is hit Open Apple and 
say, the "#" key, and dear sir will appear on 
your screen. The occasional writer, however, 
will more than likely have a difficult time re- 
membering the command to recall a macro. 

There are some "super" features that are 
overrated. For example, "automatic save to 
disk" is billed as an "extra," but can actually be 
more of a hindrance. You might be typing away 
furiously {having just broken through writer's 
block) when suddenly your machine is preoccu- 
pied with saving your work. 

THE MATCH GAME 

As you've probably already discovered, find- 
ing the perfect word-processing program is not 
easy. It takes time, energy, and, undeniably, 
abundant effort. If the word processor doesn't 
feel right for you, no list of features can com- 
pensate. But. once you find the right program. 
you'll know it. S] 



48 FAMILY COMPUTING 



HANDS-ON PREVIEW 



AMIGA 

A AAACHINE FOR EVERYONE IN THE FAMILY 



BY JOHN JAINSCHIGG 

The Amiga system and software 
used for this evaluation were notji- 
nai production versions. Commo- 
dore was kind enough to allow our 
extended evaluation of a prepro- 
duction Amiga and system software 
jusi prior to release. 

The Commodore Amiga appeared on 
the personal computer scene this au- 
tumn with some of the same kind of 
fanfare that greeted the IBM PC and 
Macintosh. The Amiga's technical 
specifications (see "Amiga Facts") 
and relativeiy low start-up cost mark 
it as a breakthrough, though the pur- 
chase of a monitor, second disk 
drive, and memory expansion could 
boost the "bargain" entry-level price 
to about S2,300. The Amiga's stun- 
ning graphics, sound, and voice syn- 
thesis features promise new and ex- 
citing programs for entertainment 
and education. A fast, powerful Mo- 
torola 68000 processor; three custom 
chips; vast memory and disk storage: 
an easy- 1 0-1 earn, "mouse-and-win- 
dow"-based operating system that al- 
lows you to run more than one pro- 
gram at a time (called "multitask- 
ing"); and optional IBM PC compati- 
bility (promised by Commodore soon 
after the machine's release) could 
make the Amiga an ideal business 
machine. Time will tell how the Ami- 
ga's sophisticated technology trans- 
lates into productivity and pleasure 
for its users. 

THE SYSTEM UNIT 

The Amiga system unit is about 
two-thirds the size of an IBM PC in all 
dimensions. The keyboard can be 
stored neatly underneath when not 
in use. Strongly constructed, the sj's- 
tem unit can support up to 40 
pounds — so you can put a monitor or 
television conveniently on top. Other 
peripherals, such as the 2400 baud 
modem and 20 megabyte hard disk 
from Tccmar, may also be stackable 
in this location. 

The system unit contains a small 
fan, which is almost inaudible and 
will likely reduce heat-related mainte- 
nance problems. On the right and 
around the back lie an array of ports 
and connectors. 




The Centronics port lets you plug 
in a variety of parallel printers. The 
serial port is programmable to work 
with printers, modems, and other pe- 
ripherals, including a promised MIDI 
(Musical Instrument Digital Inter- 
face) unit permitting control of audio 
equipment and music synthesizers. 
Though there's no room in the case 
for extra circuit cards, a port in the 
side will accept add-ons, including a 
proposed eight-megabyte RAM expan- 
sion. 

Internally, you can expand memory 
to 5 1 2K. Serious users will probably 
want to make this S200 upgrade fair- 
ly soon, mostly because the 256K 
standard memory actually turns out 
to be more like 150K when the disk 
operating system is booted up. That's 
not a lot of memory for a system de- 
signed to run not one, but many pro- 
grams at once. Even with the 256K 
upgrade installed, users may be 




With its "mulliltisking" ability, the Amiga al- 
lows yeu to have many programs on-screen and 
running at one time. 



AMIGA FACTS 

SUGGESTKD KETAII. PRICE: SI. 295. 

MEMORY: 256K user RAM: 256K of protect- 
ed RAM for operating system. In later 
models, the operating system will be 
contained in 192K of ROM. RAM is in- 
ternally expandable to 512K. externally 
to eight megabytes. 

VU5KO DISPLAY: RGB. composite color, or 
television. 

GFWPHtcs: Four resolutions: 640x400, 16 
colors; 640x200. 16 colors: 320x200, 
32 colors: special "hold-and-modify" 
mode. 4,096 colors. Colors in three 
main modes chosen freely from a pal- 
ette of 4.096 colors. Custom animation 
and graphics chips provide fast line- 
drawing and area fill, and support 
eight sprites. 

te>;t: Bit-mapped. Default display pro- 
vides 60 or 80 characters per line. 
Text may be resized; new fonts and 
styles may be loaded from disk or de- 
fined as needed by software, Text may 
be displayed in any graphics mode. 

sound: Custom sound chip produces four 
channels of synthesized or digitized 
stereo sound. Permits speech synthesis 
under software control. 

[{EYBOAUD: 89 keys, including 13-key nu- 
meric ke^fpad, cursor-control diamond, 
1 function keys, open- and closed- 
Amiga special function keys. Light on 
CAPS LOCK key. 

iNTEUi-TVCKS: Two mouse/joystick ports: 
RAM expansion slot: bus extender; vid- 
eo (for composite monitor): television; 
combined analog and digital RGB; left 
and right stereo: programmable serial: 
external disk: and Centronics compati- 
ble parallel ports. Keyboard connector. 

nt!NDi.EU fMRBWARE: Systcni Unit includes 
built-in 880K (tormatled) 3 '/2-inch 
microfloppy drive. DetachabSe key- 
board. Two-button mouse. 

BUNDLED son^vARE; Kickstart; Workbench: 
Amiga Extras (with Amiga BASIC and 
Amiga Tutor). 



hard-pressed to run more than two or 
three major applications simulta- 
neously. 

THE KEYBOARD 

The Amiga's 89-key detachable key- 
board is graceful and light. Key travel 
is full and smooth, and the touch- 
typist feels comfortable almost imme- 
diately. The RETURN and SHIFT keys 
are amply sized and normally placed. 
The keyboard also sports 10 pro- 
grammable function keys, a 13-key 
numeric keypad (lacking, unfortu- 

NOVEMBER 1985 49 




Compared fe the C 64 versisn (lop)i the Amtga 
version ol One ei> One (Electronic Arts) has mere 
detail, depth, and clorlty. It also has realistic 
sneaker-squeaking and backboard-bouncing 
sounds! 

nately. math symbols), and other 
amenities. Hopefully, software devel- 
opers will exploit these keys as they 
have so successfully in other sys- 
tems. 

TURNING IT ON 

When you turn on the Amiga, 
friendly tones and pictures prompt 
you to insert first the Kickstart disk, 
containing the operating system soft- 
ware, then the Workbench disk, con- 
taining AmigaDOS and the Intuition 
user interface. The entire procedure 
takes under a minute. 

The Workbench portion of Intut- 
lion is externally similar to the Mac- 
intosh's Finder environment. It pro- 
vides an easy-to-use "desktop" of 
icons, windows, and pull-down 
menus that can be operated with the 
mouse. Workbench lets you copy files 
and disks, run programs, and work 
quickly and easily with other func- 
tions of AmigaDOS. 

For people who feel more comfort- 
able entering DOS commands from 
the keyboard, a utility called CLl 
(Command Line Interface) permits 
this. Whichever way you choose to 
handle AmigaDOS, the system pre- 
sents a new level of functionality in 
disk operating systems. The DOS lets 
you organize files on disk into differ- 
ent classes under a hierarchy of di- 
rectories, making it easy to manage 
the large numbers of files a large-ca- 
pacity Amiga disk can hold. The fil- 



ing system should work equally well 
with the even larger volume hard 
disks soon to come. 

WORKING WITH AMIGA 

The Amiga is a true "mttltitasking" 
system. You should be able to run 
almost any group of programs togeth- 
er without any conflict. The effect of 
multitasking must be seen to be be- 
lieved — its potential for improving 
productivity is immense. Imagine 
printing out a file from your word 
processor while simultaneously 
downloading another over the mo- 
dem. Or backing up a disk through 
DOS while simultaneously running 
the programs it contains. Do you 
wish your word processor could edit 
two files at once? Ten fUes? No prob- 
lem. Just load the processor several 
times into different windows, load a 
file into each, and you're running. 

Though the software at our dispos- 
al was limited, we were able to play a 
little with the Amiga's multitasking 
capabilities. We were, for example, 
able to run several graphics demon- 
strations simultaneously, and, in an- 
other test, obtain directories from 
two disks at the same time through 
two CLI windows. 

GRAPHICS AND SOUND 

Workbench runs in a high-resolu- 
tion, 640x400 pixel mode in four 
colors. Text, whether the user elects 
to display it at 60 or 80 columns, is 
clear and unwavering on the RGB 
display. It's also remarkably readable 
on a composite color monitor — par- 
ticularly In the 60-column mode. 

We were able to sample the Amiga's 
graphics and sound capabilities by 
running some utility and demonstra- 
tion programs. One demo portrayed a 
group of multicolored planes that 
seemed to rotate in perspective. The 
effect was accomplished mainly by 
the special graphics hardware, which 
drew lines, filled areas of the screen 
with color, and then erased them, all 
at amazing speed. An impressive 
sound demo (written partially in BA- 
SIC) loaded digital data describing the 
sound of a drumbeat into RAM, then 
let us play the drums by tapping on 
the keyboard. Even through the mon- 
itor's tiny speaker, the effect was un- 
cannily realistic. 

Another BASIC sound demo em- 
ployed the speech library functions 
accessible to all programs running on 
the Amiga. Text could be entered at 
the keyboard, then would be spoken 
back by the system in either a "male" 
or "female" voice. The Amiga's speech 
was as good as or better than any syn- 
thetic speech we've heard. 



AMIGA SOFTWARE 

Even the best machine won't do much 
without software, and while lilUe was 
available when the Amiga was released, 
developers expect many products to be 
available by Ciirislmas or early next year. 
In addition to the sofnvare listed here. 
many languages such as Logo and Pascal 
are eilso being developed. We have given 
prices where available, and consumers 
ran write to the Director of Software at 
Commodore Business Machines. Inc., 
1200 Wilson Drive, West Chester, PA 
1 9380. for more information. 

Aegis Development Corp.. (213) 
306-0735; Amiga Draw. $150: Amiga 
Draw Professional. $495. Arktronics. 
(313) 769-7253: Textcrajt. Batteries In. 
(ludecl, (416) 881-9941: HomePak, S70: 
Portfolio. S230. Broderbund/Synapse. 
(415) 479-1170: The Print Shop. Essex. 
Brimstone. CalCraJt. Mindwheel. Chang 
Labs, (800) 972-8800: Rags to Riches. 
Includes four integrated accounting 
packages {Ledger. Receivables. Pay- 
ables, Sales), about S225 each. Cherry 
Lane Technologies. (212) 824-771 1: 
Concert Craft, S79: Texture, S249. Elec- 
tronic Arts, (415) 572-ARTS: Return to 
Atlantis, Marble Madness, Arcticfox, De- 
luxe Printing. Deluxe Graphics. Deluxe 
Video Construction Set. Deluxe Music 
Construction Set. Skyfox. Seven Cities of 
Gold, Archon. Julius Erving and Larry 
Bird Go One-On-One, Plnball Construc- 
tion Set, Financial Cookbook, prices 
from S40-S50. Island Graphics. (415) 
332-5400; PaintCraft. Business Graph- 
ics, Graphlcraft, Animation. Mind- 
scape, Inc.. (312) 480-7667; Keyboard 
Cadet. $40: The Halley Project: A Mis- 
sion In Our Solar System. $50; Deja Vu: 
A Nightmare Come True. S60. ?he Soft- 
ware Group, (518) 877-8600; Enable/ 
Write. Enable/Office Manager, Enable/ 
Calc. Enable/File. Tardis Software, 
(408) 372-1722: Maximillian, integrated 
business software: includes MaxiCalc. 
MaxlWord. MaxiGraph, MajciTerm, and 
MaxlShare. $195. 



CONCLUSION 

By welding color graphics and 
sound to number-crunching power, 
and coating the bond with sophisti- 
cated and user-friendly features, the 
Amiga combines elements of and sets 
new performance standards for ma- 
chines in the low, middle, and high 
ends of the market. Those who need 
a computer for only one application 
may well not make full use of the 
Amiga's versatility. Those with wide- 
ranging needs, creative profession- 
als, for example, or those searching 
for a home system but unwilling to 
compromise on business power, should 
take a long look at the machine. Its 
ease of use may captivate the novice; 
kids may be turned on by its graphics 
and sound. With the proper software, 
Amiga may yet prove its "fitness for 
any particular purpose. "H 



50 FAMILY COMPUTING 




Apple Mac 512" 




IBMPCAT 




Commodore Amiga 



THERFSONLYONEWORD 
RNtTHESE PRICES: 

MP-OFF. 



Introducing the Atari 520ST personal computer system. $799.95"^ complete. 



Go ahead. Compaie those other 
macliiiics witli the new Atari SIOST'" 
They cost hundreds of dollars more, but 
you don't get much in retum.That's 
what we call a rip- off. 

For $799.95,* the 520ST comes com- 
plete with high-resolution monochrome 



;.I.\qi- 


IBM" 
PCAF" 


APPtr™ 

Msciilosh™ 


COMMOOORE'" 
AMIGA™ 


Price 


;,;'-';' 


14675 


$2795 


$1795 


CPU 
speed MHz 


80 


80286 
6.0 


66O00 
783 


680O0 
716 


SlandardRAM 


512K 


256K 


512K 


25BK 


Number o( Keys 


95 


95 


59 


89 


Mouse 


Ye-i 


No 


Yes 


Yes 


Screen Resolution 
(Non-Inter laced Mode) 
Color l-.l- ■ :-'-:' 
Monochfome k'-' '■'■'■ 


640x200 
720x350" 


None 
512x342 


640x200"' 
640x200"" 


Color Oulpul Y'., 


Optional 


None 


Yes 


Number ofColofs ■■■'Q 


16 


None 


4096 


Disk Drive :>:i' 


6,25" 


3.5" 


3.5" 


Buill-in Hard Disk 
(DMA) R:rt 


Vfes 


No 


No 


MIDI Interlace 


Ysi 


No 


No 


No 


Naol Sound Voices 


3 


1 


4 


4 



**Willi optional monocbrome board {iHin bit-mapped) 
•"Inleilace Mode- 640 « 400 



monitor, 2-button mouse, 3.5" disk 
drive, TOS" Operating System, including 
GEM"' Desktop, plus Logo™ and Atiiri 
BASIC programming languages. S200 
more gives you iin RGB color monitor 
with 512 glowing colors. 

Choose innovative business, enter- 
tainment, education, systems m;inage- 
ment,and integrated package software. 
Expand your 520 ST with industry 
standard parallel printers, modems, 
MIDI controlled synthesizers and key- 




\ 






< r ,K ~ r < r 



i 



MMi . >M . ; i i i ii; i ' p g 





boards, 1 
megabyte 
floppies, 10 
MBtind 
larger hard 
disks, and 
more. AH 
available 
now; At re- 
markably low prices. 

So, go ahead. Compare the ST system 
to those other guys. Only Atari gives 
you so much. For so little. 

For the dealer nearest you, write Atari 
Corp., Customer Services, 1196 Borrcgas 
Ave., Sunnyvale, CA 94086. 

•Plus applicable local taxes. S999.95 wiiri color monitor. 
Alt prces are manulacturer's suggested retail list 



AATARi; 

Power without ^ price. 



BM & PCAT are registered trademarksgf Inler- 
na!ionai Business Machines Corp- Commodore 
& Amiga are irademarksof Commodore EieC' 
tonics LTD AppieS, Macintosh are 
Irademarksof Apple Computef. inc. 
GEM IS a trademark ol Digital Re- 
search inc Alari.TOS& Logo are 
irademarks of Aiar» Corp. 




^^ 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 4 



GettheOK]DATA120 
at these fine stores: 

Advantage Computer 

Accessories (Canada) 
Childworid/Children's Palace 
Consumers Distributing 
Crazy Eddie 
David Weis 
Electronics Boutique/ 

Games & Gadgets 
Federated 
Fred Meyer 
Lionel/Kiddie City/ 

Lionel Pla>'worid 
Montgomery Ward 

(at participating stores) 
S. E.Nichols 
Service Merchandise 
Toys 'R Us 



Left Brain. 







Rational. Functional. Precise. 

Introducing the OKIDATA 120, the logical printer for your 

Commodore" computer. 

Get results fast. With a utility mode that zips through letters 
and reports at twice the speed of any Commodore printer. 

Sviitch to the enhanced mode. And print your most important 
ideas with typewriter clarity. Or illustrate your rationale with the 
120's bit image graphics for high resolution charts, graphs and 
drawings. 

Stay on target. With a self-inking "Clean Hands" ribbon 
cartridge. And Okidata's famous full year warranty on parts, 
labor and printhead. 

The OKIDATA 120. At $269* , it's the only Commodore- 
compatible printer that makes sense. 

For more informab'on, call 1-800-OKIDATA (in New Jersey 
60&-23S-2600). Mt. Laurel, NJ 08054. 



OKIDATA 

^k an OKI AMERICA company 

We put business on paper. 



CommoiloFe Li 3 re^tered trademark of Commodore Buaness Machines, Inc. 
OKIDATA isa rt-sislLTKl Iradcmnrk of OKI AMERICA, INC. 
'Manufaclurer'.'i suggested retail price. 



Right Brain 




p>eHiiurM0t_ 




Effervescent Colorful. Outrageous, 

Meet the OKIMATE 10, the $208* color printer that takes 

your Atari' or Commodore' computer over the rainbow! 

Dazzle 'em. With brilliant printing in over 36 eye-tickling 
colors. Reds, greens, golds and blues that breathe life into 
everything: from charts and graphs to original drawings and 
overhead transparencies. 

And when you're forced to work in black and white, the 
OKIMATE 10 prints crisp, clean reports and papers— at 240 
words per minute. You can even add spice with wide, bold and 
fine print 

Everything you need for color printing comes with the 
OKIMATE 10 and its Plug 'n Print package. Including a data 
cable. Learn to Print and Color Screen Print software diskettes, 
a color ribbon cartridge, a black ribbon cartridge and paper. 

So c'mon, print on the wild side. With the OKIMATE 10 
Personal Color Printer from Okidata. 

For more information, call 1-800-OKIDATA (in New Jersey 
609-235-2600). Mt. Laurel, NJ 08054. 




an OKI AMERICA company 

We put business on p^5er. 

"Manuferturer's suggestcJ retail price, .^tari a a registered tradcmarli of .Atari. Inc. 

Commodore is a registered trademark !)f Commudore Business Machines, Inc. 

OKIDATA is a registered tradfmart< of OKI A.VERICA. INC. 

OKl.viATE and Plug n Print aro trademarks of OKI A.MERICA. INC. 

To run Plug 'n Print software, the Commixloro M. 128 and PLUS 4 require disk drive. 

Atari requires disk drive and a 48K memor)-. 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 30 



Buy Nowl 
$15 Manufacturer's 
rebate on OKIMATL 10. 
Offer good from October 1 , 
1985 through Januan' 31 , 
1986. See the following par- 
ticipating stores for details. 

Ach'antage Computer 

Accessories (Canada) 
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N 


O V E 


M B E 


R 




TIPS TO THE TYPIST 


FUN/LEARNING 


ARCADE GAME 


FEATURE PROGRAM 




Page 56 


PROGRAM 


Page 65 


Page 70 




Helpful hints on how 


Page 57 


You'll need 


Back 




to type in 


Test 


fast reflexes and 


by popular demand. 




programs. 


your vocabulary 


nenfes of steel 


our multifunction 




and what to do 


against a 


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if a program 


friend's. 


Get •Em. 


Home Information Manager. 




doesn't worit. 


and learn about 
computer logic, 
with Word Wars. 




is presented here 

for the Apple 11 series. 




PROGS 


tAMMINC P.S. Page 65 Co 


rrections to previous months" 


programs. 



HLVSTKAnOS BV JIM CHBKKV KI 



TIPS TO THE TYPIST 



Typing in family coMPurmcs programs is a great way to 
become familiar with your computer and get some free 
software "to boot." But it's frustrating to type in a long 
program only to find it doesn't work as it should. When 
this happens, simple typing errors are most often the 
cause. So to help you gain greatest value from the time 
you spend computing with us, weVe put together some 
tips on how to avoid typing errors— and what to do if a 
program doesn't run right. Read them carefully and you 11 
be up and running In no time! 



SOMi GENERAL RULES 



1 • Do read instructions and program headings carefully. 
Make sure your computer has enough memory, the right 
version of BASIC, and the appropriate peripherals (joy- 
sticks, printers, disk drives, etc.) for a program. 

2* D»n't let fatigue and boredom contribute to inaccura- 
cy. If you're new to programming, try typing in shorter 
programs first. Type in a longer program in easy stages, 
SAVEing each installment as you go. 

3« Until you are fairly familiar with BASIC, do assume 
that every word, number, letter, space, and punctuation 
mark in a program listing must be copied accurately if the 
program is to function as Intended. 

fl« Do watch out for potential trouble spots. About 90 
percent of all typing errors occur in data statements: long 
lines filled with numbers or incomprehensible secret 
codes. If possible, have someone else read data to you as 
you type, and help you proofread it if you have trouble 
later on. Proofreading from a printout is best. 

5« O* be aware that program listings printed in family 
COMPUTING sometimes differ from what you will see on your 
computer's screen or in printouts you produce at home. 
Our program listings are printed 54 characters wide. 
Thus, a single BASIC program "line" (sometimes called a 
"logical line") may appear as several lines in our listing. If 
you are typing along and reach the right margin of the 
printed listing, don't press RETURN or ENTER until 
you've checked to see if the program "line" you're typing 
really ends there. The way to tell is to check if the line 
following begins with a multiple of 10 that follows in 
sequence from the previous logical line, rem statements 
are the exception and typing them in is optional. 

Several computers (ADAM. Apple, Atari, and Tl) format 
BASIC programs according to unique rules of their own. 
Don't let this throw you^ust tv'pe in the listing exactly as 
printed in the magazine and your computer is guaran- 
teed to accept it, even though it may end up looking a little 
different on your screen. 

0» One foolproof way to correct an error in a BASIC 
program line is to type the line in again from the begin- 
ning, and press RETURN or ENTER to set it in place of the 
old one in your computer's memory. 



WHICH PROGRAMS WILL RUN ON MY COMPUTER? 




Unless a program heading indicates otherwise, programs 



will run on any version of the computer specified, with the 
following exceptions: 

• Apple programs run under Applesoft [not Integer) BA- 
SIC on the Apple II (with language card). II plus. He. and 
lie. 

• IBM compatibility of BASIC programs is determined 
by both the hardware and the version of BASIC used. Our 
programs for IBM PC & compatibles are composed on IBM 
PC & PCjrs, and tested undermost versions of BASIC avail- 
able for these machines. They are then tested on a variety 
of IBM -compatible machines under the versions of BASIC 
supplied with them.Each"IBM PC & compatibles" program 
listing is supplemented by a rundown of the machines and 
versions of BASIC under which the program is guaranteed 
to work. Most programs will probably run on many other 
PC Compatibles and under other versions of BASIC. 

• TI programs not marked "w/TI Extended BASIC" should 
be run under standard (console) TI BASIC. 



DEBUGGING HINTS 



Sometimes even tlie most careful typist makes a mis- 
take. Don't expect your program to run right off the bat. If 
you have problems, remain patient and follow these gener- 
al instructions for a probable quick fix. 

1 • Write down any error messages you receive. 

2* If necessary, look these up in your manual, and check 
the indicated lines for simple mistakes. Also check related 
lines (see No. 4, below), such as the data statements corre- 
sponding to a read routine. Correct ail the problems you 
can find, and save a corrected copy of the program before 
typing HUN again. If you're lucky, all systems will be GO; if 
not .... 

3* LIST the program in screen-size chunks (check your 
manual for instructions on how to LIST parts of a pro- 
gram). Even better, if you have a printer, gel a printout. 
Compare what you've typed in — letter by letter — to the 
published program. Make sure that you haven't typed the 
numeral (which is slashed in our listings) for the letter O 
(which isn't), swapped a small letter "\" for the numeral 
one, dropped or mixed up some punctuation, switched 
uppercase text for lowercase, or vice versa (particularly in 
data statements or within quotes), or miscounted the 
characters (and/or spaces) between a pair of quotes. Get 
someone to help you if possible. 

4» Check your data statements — then check them again. 
Mistakes in data statements are the single most common 
cause of program failures. Bad data can cause a program 
to malfunction at any point, which can be misleading. If 
you can't find your error in the lines the computer speci- 
fies, check your data statements line by line, letter by 
letter, comma by comma. Then have someone else check 
it for you. 

5* If all else falls, turn off your computer and relax. Then 
try again the next day — exhausted proofreaders are care- 
less proofreaders. 



e3- 



56 FAMILY COMPUTING 



FUN/LEARNING PROCRAM 



WaRD WARS 

BY JOEY LATIMER 



U/AR 





Pit yourself against a 
friend in a battle of 
words — play Word Wars! 
The object of the game is 
to type in a word with ei- 
ther a lower or higher val- 
ue {the computer decides 
which) than the word the 
other player chooses. The 
computer, acting as judge 
and referee, also adds chal- 
lenge to the game by decid- 
ing how many letters 
should be in each word 
and what the first letter 
should be. After you've 
each typed in a word of the 
right length, beginning 
with the proper letter, the 
computer figures out their 
values. Depending on 
whether the goal was to 
produce a lower- or a high- 
er-valued word, one player 
wins the round. In the rare 
case that both players' 
words have equal value, 
the round is considered a 
tie. 

The computer deter- 
mines the value of each 
word by adding up the 
"ASCII" codes of each let- 
ter. ASCII (American Stan- 
dard Code for Information 
Interchange) is the numer- 
ic code your computer uses 
internally to represent let- 
ters, numbers, and other 
characters. In ASCII, the 
capital letter "A" is repre- 
sented by the number 65. 
"B" with 66, on up to "Z" — 
which is coded as 90. Low- 
ercase letters, punctuation 
marks, etc., are represent- 
ed by different ranges in 
the ASCII code, and minor 
details may vary from one 
type of computer to anoth- 
er. (Check your computer 
manual for an ASCII table.) 
However, you don't have 



to think in terms of ASCII 
codes to play Word Wars. 
All a player really has to 
remember is that an "A" 
counts for less than a "B." 
which counts for less than 
a "C," etc. Note also that 
Word Wars won't work reli- 
ably unless you enter 
words (and answer the 
computer's questions) in 
all capital letters and avoid 
using punctuation. Make 
sure the CAPS LOCK key 
(or equivalent) is down be- 
fore you play! 

To make the game fair. 
Word Wars will ask players 
to verify that the words 
they enter arc actually in 
the dictionary. Players 
should agree to accept 
whatever dictionary they 
have on hand as an au- 
thority. 

THE LOGIC or WOKD WARS 

At the beginning of each 
round, the computer de- 
cides randomly if players 
should aim for lower- or 
higher-valued words. The 
statement that makes the 
decision looks something 
like this: 

HL = (RND> = 0.5) 

This strange-looking 
statement is really a simple 
assignment statement (it 
assigns the value on the 
right to the variable on the 
left), just like x = i . In oth- 
er words, the expression 
inside the parentheses has 
an actual numeric value 
that is assigned to variable 

HL. 

Such an expression, 
called "Boolean" after the 
19th-century mathemati- 
cian George Boole, is either 
true or false. In this case, 
the random number rnd ei- 



ther is greater than or 
equal to = 1 0.5 (and the 
expression is true) or it is 
not (and the expression is 
false). Other examples of 
Boolean expressions are 
tx=Yi and (A<2 OR B>3). 

How does BASIC repre- 
sent the logical value ( true 
or false) of a Boolean ex- 
pression as a number? On 
many computers, the value 
- 1 stands for "true" and 
stands for "false." We say 
these computers have 
"negative logic." Others 
(e.g.. ADAM, Apple 11 se- 
ries, and Atari) use + 1 to 
mean "true" and, again. 
to mean "false." We say 
those computers have 
"positive logic." To find out 
which your computer has, 
just type in something like 
PRINT|3 = 3| — without a line 
number — at your BASIC 
prompt, and press RE- 
TURN or ENTER. It's cer- 
tainly true that 3 equals 3, 
so either 1 or - 1 will be 
displayed on your screen. 

The Boolean expression 
(i?ND> = 0.5) uses the rnd 
function to generate a ran- 
dom decimal fraction be- 
tween and 1 , and com- 
pares it to 0.5. If the 
random number is greater 
than or equal to 0.5, the 
expression is true and vari- 
able HL is given the value 
- 1 (or -1-1 on systems us- 
ing positive logic). This 
makes the higher-valued 
word win the current 
round. If the random num- 
ber is less than 0.5, the ex- 
pression is "false" and hl 
gets the value 0, making 
the lower-valued word win. 

At each round's conclu- 
sion, the values calculated 
for each player's word are 
compared by another Bool- 
ean expression; 

CM « (L(2!>L(U1 

Here, Liii is the Vcdue of the 
first player's word, and l(2| 
the value of the second 
player's. The variable cm is 



given the value - I (or -1- 1) 
if the second player's word 
has a higher value than 
the first player's. Other- 
wise, it's given the value 0. 

Using the values for hl 
and CM, we can create a ta- 
ble that anticipates all pos- 
sible outcomes of a round. 
Each value is expressed in 
terms of negative logic 
(- I="true"), [See below.] 

Note that when hl and 
CM differ, player 1 wins, 
whereas when hl and CM 
are the same, player 2 
wins. A third Boolean ex- 
pression makes use of this 
fact; 

1 --|HL = CM) (on systems 
with negative logic), or 
1 +IHL=CM) (on systems 
with positive logic). 

The expression ihl=cmi 
has the value - 1 (or -1- 1) 
when HL and cm are the 
same, when they differ. 
Thus, the expression 

l-(HL = CM){Orl + |HL = CM) on 

positive systems) produces 
a value of 1 when player 1 
wins, and 2 when player 2 
wins! 

OTHER FEATURES 

Most versions of Word 
Wars use a randomize 
statement or randomizing 
procedure to make sure 
the game doesn't play the 
same way each time. Read- 
ers unfamiliar with the use 
of random numbers in 
computer programs may 
wish to refer to Character 
Race in last month's issue. 

As always, if you come 
up with a good enhance- 
ment or modification of 
one of our Beginner pro- 
grams, we'd like to see it, 
and maybe mention it in a 
future issue. Send a print- 
out (no tapes or disks, 
please) to: 

Beginner Programs 

FAMILY COMPUTING 

730 Broadway 
New York. NY 10003 



-Q: 



If HL 

has value. . . 

(tow wins) 

(low wins) 

- 1 (high wins) 

- 1 (high wins) 



. . .and CM 
has value. . . 

[player 1 high) 

- 1 (player 2 high) 
(player 1 high) 

- 1 (player 2 high) 



. . .then: 

player 2 wins 
player 1 wins 
player 1 wins 
player 2 wins 



NOVEMBER 1985 57 




FUN/LEARNING PROGRAM 



AD AMI Word Wars 

10 DIM s(2) 

28 r = 1 

30 HOME 

40 PRINT "TO RANDOMIZE, INPUT A" 

50 INPUT "NUMBER GREATER THAN 1. ";n 

60 FOR i = 1 TO n 

70 n = RNDd) 

80 NEXT i 

90 HOME 

100 PRINT TABn2);"*U0RD WARS*" 

110 PRINT 

120 PRINT "ROUND M";r 

130 PRINT 

140 hL = (RND(I) >= .5) 

150 Ln = INTCRND(1)*3)+5 

160 al = INTCRND(1J*26)+65 

170 IF hL THEN dl = "HIGHER-":GOT0 190 

180 d$ = "LOWER-" 

190 PRINT "IN THIS ROUND, PLAYERS WILL" 

200 PRINT "AIM FOR ";d$;"VALUED WORDS." 

210 PRINT "THE WORDS MUST BE ";Ln;" LETTERS" 

220 PRINT "LONG AND MUST BEGIN WITH THE" 

230 PRINT "LETTER ";CHRS(34);CHR$CaL>;CHR$C34);"." 

240 FOR j = 1 TO 2 

250 PRINT 

260 PRINT "YOUR WORD, PLAYER ";j; 

270 INPUT H$ 

280 IF LEN(w$) <> Ln OR LEFT$Cw$,1) <> CHRSCaL) THEN 2 

60 

290 s<j) = 

300 FOR k = 1 TO Ln 

310 sCj) = sCj)+ASC(MI0$Cw$,k,1>) 

320 NEXT k 

330 NEXT j 

340 PRINT 

350 PRINT "ARE BOTH THESE WORDS IN YOUR" 

360 INPUT "DICTIONARY? ";ynS 

370 IF LEFT$(yn$,1) <> "Y" THEN 90 

380 PRINT 

390 IF s<15 <> s(2) THEN 430 

400 PRINT "BOTH THESE WORDS HAVE" 

410 PRINT "THE SAME VALUE." 

420 GOTO 460 

430 cm = CsC2) > s<1)) 

440 PRINT "PLAYER ";1+(hL = cm);" WINS, WITH A" 

450 PRINT d$; "VALUED WORD." 

460 PRINT 

470 PRINT "PRESS <E> TO END OR ANY OTHER" 

480 PRINT "KEY TO PLAY ANOTHER ROUND." 

490 GET kp$ 



500 IF kpS = "E" OR kp$ 
510 r = r+1 
520 GOTO 90 



"e" THEN END 




Apple II series/ HTorrf Wars 

10 DIM SC2) 
20 R = 1 
30 HOME 

40 PRINT "PRESS ANY KEY TO RANDOMIZE."; 
50 POKE -16368,0 

60 IF PEEK(-16384) < 128 THEN N = RNDC1>:G0T0 60 
70 POKE -16368,0 
80 HOME 

90 PRINT TAB(15);"*W0RD WARS*" 
100 PRINT 

110 PRINT "ROUND #";R 
120 PRINT 

130 HL = CRND(I) >= 0.5) 
140 LN = INT(RND(1)*3)+5 
150 AL = INTCRND(1)*26)+65 
160 IF HL THEN D$ = "HIGHER-" :GOT0 180 
170 DS = "LOWER-" 

180 PRINT "IN THIS ROUND, PLAYERS WILL AIM FOR" 
Q190 PRINT D$;"VALUED WORDS. THE WORDS MUST" 



200 PRINT "BE ";LN;" LETTERS LONG AND MUST BEGIN" 

210 PRINT "WITH THE LETTER "; CHR$(34);CHR$CAL);CHR$C34 

);"." 

220 FOR J = 1 TO 2 

230 PRINT 

240 PRINT "YOUR WORD, PLAYER ";J; 

250 INPUT W$ 

260 IF LEN(WS) <> LN OR L£FTSCWS,1) <> CHRSCAL) THEN 2 

40 

270 S<J) = 

280 FOR K = 1 TO LN 

290 S(J) = S<:j)+ASC(HID$(WS,K,1)) 

300 NEXT K 

310 NEXT J 

320 PRINT 

330 PRINT "ARE BOTH THESE WORDS IN YOUR" 

340 INPUT "DICTIONARY? ";YNS 

350 IF LEFT$<YN$,1) <> "Y" THEN 30 

360 PRINT 

370 IF S(1) = S(2) THEN PRINT "BOTH THESE WORDS HAVE T 

HE SAKE VALUE. ":GOTO 410 

380 CM = (SC2) > SCD) 

390 PRINT "PLAYER ";1+(HL = CM);" WINS, WITH A" 

400 PRINT D$;"VALUED WORD." 

410 PRINT 

420 PRINT "PRESS <E> TO END OR ANY OTHER KEY TO" 

430 PRINT "PLAY ANOTHER ROUND." 

440 GET KPS 

450 IF KPS = "E" THEN END 

460 R = R+1 

470 GOTO 80 



Atari 400, 800, 600/800XL, & ISOXE/HTord Wars 

10 DIM D$n0),W$<20),YN$C1),S(2) 

19 REM —PREPARE TO GET KEYPRESS IN LINE 400~ 

20 OPEN #1,4,0,"K:" 
30 R=1 

40 PRINT CHR$(125) 

50 POSITION 1S,0:PRINT "*WORD WARS*" 

60 PRINT 

70 PRINT "ROUND #"; R 

80 PRINT 

90 HL=CRND(0)>=0.5) 

100 LN=INT(RND(0)*3)+5 

110 AL=INT<RND(0)*26)+6S 

120 IF HL THEN D$="HI6HER-":G0T0 140 

130 D$="LOWER-" 

140 PRINT "IN THIS ROUND, PLAYERS WILL AIM FOR" 

150 PRINT DS;"VALUED WORDS. THE WORDS MUST" 

160 PRINT "BE ";LN;" LETTERS LONG AND MUST BEGIN" 

170 PRINT "WITH THE LETTER ";CHRSC34);CHR$(AL);CHR$C34 

);"." 

180 FOR J=1 TO 2 

190 PRINT 

200 PRINT "YOUR WORD, PLAYER ";J; 

210 INPUT WS 

220 IF LEN(W$)<>LN OR W$<1 ,1 )<>CHRS<AL) THEN 200 

230 S(J)=0 

240 FOR K=1 TO LN 

250 S(J)=S(J)+ASC(M$CK,K)) 

260 NEXT K 

270 NEXT J 

280 PRINT 

290 PRINT "ARE BOTH THESE WORDS IN YOUR" 

300 PRINT "DICTIONARY"; 

310 INPUT YN$ 

320 IF YN$<>"Y" THEN 40 

330 PRINT 

340 IF S(1)=SC2) THEN PRINT "BOTH THESE WORDS HAVE THE 

SAME VALUE.": GOTO 380 
350 CM=CSC2)>S(1)) 

360 PRINT "PLAYER ";1+CHL=CM);" WINS, WITH A" 
370 PRINT D$;"VALUED WORD." 
380 PRINT 
390 PRINT "PRESS ANY KEY TO PLAY ANOTHER ROUND."; 



^ 



58 FAMILY COMPUTING 






Keyboarding software from South-Western. The perfect gift for the whole family. 
KEYBOARDING ALPHA-PAC and MICROTYPE, THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF PAWS make 
learning how to keyboard the right way fun — and effective. 

Designed for children ages 8 to 12, MICROTYPE, THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF PAWS uses 
"PAWS," an animated cat, to teach basic keyboarding skills. 

And. for adult learners, KEYBOARDING ALPHA-PAC uses animated graphics to 
demonstrate which fingers should strike which keys and show correct hand position. 

Get the most out of your family computer, order these 
unique software packages for this holiday season! 








Vcll***3 






To order your software packages, fill out this form and return it today! 




Please send me: 



. copies of MICROTYPE, THE WONDERi=UL WORLD OF PAWS 

a! 539,95* each D Apple" II Plus, lie. lie L 1 Commodore 64" 
n IBM PC, PCjr" 

. copies of KEYBOARDING ALPHA-PAC at S39,95* each 
n Apple* II Plus, lie, lie n Commodore 64" n IBM PC, PCjr' 
DTRS-80- Models III and 4 LJ Tandy' 1000 

_ Enter total cost of all software ordered 

. Add 6% for shipping and handling, plus local sales tax 

.TOTAL PRICE 



Name 

Address . 



City/State/ZIP 

n MasterCard D VISA 
Card Ho 



. Expires - 



Cardholder's Name 

Cardholder's Phone No 

Cardholder's Signature 

D Check enclosed for S 

■Price subject to chanje without notice 

Customers outside ttie US or its possessions sliauld contact our oflice tor Itie neaisst jgent or 

distritiutor before placing an order. 



South-Westem Publishing Ca, ATTN: Consumer/Professional Products Division, 5101 Madison Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45227 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 41 



FUN/LEARNING PROGRAM 



i^m GET n^,KP 

410 R=R+1 
420 GOTO 40 



Commedere 6a & 128/IVorrf Wars 

10 DIM S<2) 

20 R=1 

30 PRINT CHRSC147); 

40 PRINT TA8(15);"*W0RD WARS*" 

50 PRINT 

60 PRINT "ROUND #";R 

70 PRINT 

80 HL=CRND(0)>=0.5? 

90 LN=INTCRND(0)*5)+4 

100 AL=INTtRNDC0)*26)t65 

110 IF HL THEN DS="HIGHER-":G0TO 130 

120 D$="LOHER-" 

130 PRINT "IN THIS ROUND, PLAYERS WILL AIM FOR" 

140 PRINT DS;"VALUED WORDS. THE WORDS MUST" 

150 PRINT "BE"; LN; "LETTERS LONG AND MUST BEGIN" 

160 PRINT "WITH THE LETTER ";CHR$C34);CHR$<AL);CHR$<34 

);"." 

170 FOR J=1 TO 2 

180 PRINT 

190 PRINT "YOUR WORD, PLAYER";J; 

199 REM —CLEAR tf$ FOR NEW INPUT— 

200 W$="" 
210 INPUT W$ 

220 IF LENCW$)<>LN OR LEFTS(W$,1 JOCHRSCAL) THEN 190 

230 S(J)=C 

240 FOR K=1 TO LN 

250 S(J)=SCJ)+ASC(MID$(WS,K,1)) 

260 NEXT K 

270 NEXT J 

280 PRINT 

289 REM —CLEAR YNS FOR NEW INPUT — 

290 YNS="" 

300 PRINT "ARE BOTH THESE WORDS IN YOUR" 

310 INPUT "DICTIONARY";YN$ 

320 IF LEFT$(YNS,1)<>"Y" THEN 30 

330 PRINT 

340 IF S<1)=SC2) THEN PRINT "BOTH THESE WORDS HAVE THE 

SAME VALUE. ":GOTO 380 
350 CM=(S(2)>S(1)) 

360 PRINT "PLAYER";1-(HL=CM);"WiNS, WITH A" 
370 PRINT D$;"VALUED WORD." 
380 PRINT 

390 PRINT "PRESS ANY KEY TO PLAY ANOTHER ROUND." 
400 GET KP$:IF KP$="" THEN 400 
410 R=R+1 
420 GOTO 30 



IBM PC & compatibles*/ MTerd Wors 

10 DIM S<2) 

20 R=1 

30 RANDOMIZE 

40 CLS 

50 PRINT TAB(15);"*W0RD WARS*" 

60 PRINT 

70 PRINT "ROUND S";R 

80 PRINT 

90 HL=CRND>=.5) 

100 LN=lNTCRND*3)+5 

110 AL=INT(RN0*26)+65 

120 IF HL THEN D$="HIGHER-" ELSE 0$="LOWER-" 

130 PRINT "IN THIS ROUND, PLAYERS WILL AIM FOR" 

140 PRINT DS;"VALUED WORDS. THE WORDS MUST" 

150 PRINT "BE"; LN; "LETTERS LONG AND MUST BEGIN" 

160 PRINT "WITH THE LETTER ";CHR$<34);CHR$(AL);CHfi$C34 

\ .tt K 

170 FOR J=1 TO 2 

180 PRINT 

190 PRINT "YOUR WORD, PLAYER";J; 




200 INPUT W$ 

210 IF LEN(W$)<>LN OR LEFT$(WS,1 )<>CHR$(AL) THEN 190 

220 SCJ>=0 

230 FOR K=1 TO LN 

240 SCJ)=S(J)+ASC(«ID$(W$,K,1)> 

250 NEXT K 

260 NEXT J 

270 PRINT 

280 PRINT "ARE BOTH THESE WORDS IN YOUR" 

290 INPUT "DICTIONARY";YNS 

300 IF LEFT$(YN$,1)<>"Y" THEN 40 

310 PRINT 

320 IF S(1)=S(2) THEN PRINT "BOTH THESE WORDS HAVE THE 

SAME VALUE. ":GOTO 360 
330 CM=<S(2)>S(1)> 

340 PRINT "PLAYER";1-(HL=CM);"WINS, WITH A" 
350 PRINT DS;"VALUED WORD." 
360 PRINT 

370 PRINT "PRESS ANY KEY TO PLAY ANOTHER ROUND." 
380 IF INKEY$="" THEN 380 ELSE R=R+1:G0T0 40 

•This proflraiil )lus been Irarefi an thv folioii'ing computers, using IJlc liASlCs 
SdOiun: Jfi.\f rc irCalorGrnp(lli.-s/ldap[erorAlon(>i-hrami7'Pr((iffrCard. ivIDlsk BA- 
SIC O2.()0 orAduancea BASIC A2.00. IBM PCjr. wCasstrttf BASIC CI. 20 or Canridoe 
BASIC JLUO. Tandy 1000. wIGW-BASIC 2.02 uerston 00.05 00 



Macintosh w/Micresoft BASIC i.OlWord Wars 

DIM SC2) 
R=1 

RANDOMIZE TIMER 
HAINLOOP: 
CLS 

WINDOW 1,"*W0RD WARS*" 
PRINT 

PRINT "ROUND #";R 
PRINT 

HL=(RNDC1)>=.5) 
LN=INTCRND<1)*3)+5 
AL=INT(RND(1J*26)+65 

IF HL THEN D$="HIGHER-" ELSE D$="LOWER-" 
PRINT "IN THIS ROUND, PLAYERS WILL AIM FOR ";D$;"V 
ALUED WORDS." 

PRINT "THE WORDS MUST BE"; LN; "LETTERS LONG" 
PRINT "AND MUST BEGIN WITH THE LETTER ";CHR$(34);C 
HR$(AL);CHR$(34);"." 
FOR J=1 TO 2 
PRINT 
THISPLAYER: 

PRINT "YOUR WORD, PLAYER";J; 
INPUT W$ 

IF LEN(W$)<>LN OR LEFTS (W$,1)<>CHR$CALJ THEN THI 
SPLAYER 

S(J)=0 

FOR IC=1 TO LN 

S(J)=SCJ)+ASCCMID$(W$,K,1)) 
NEXT K 
NEXT J 
PRINT 

INPUT "ARE BOTH THESE WORDS IN YOUR DICTIONARY"; YN 
$ 

IF LEFT$(YN$,1)<>"Y" THEN HAINLOOP 
PRINT 

IF SC1J=SC2) THEN PRINT "BOTH THESE WORDS HAVE THE 
SAME VALUE.": GOTO NEXTROUND 
CM=(SC2)>S(1)) 

PRINT "PLAYEfi";1-(HL=CM);"WINS, WITH A ";D$;"VALUE 
D WORD." 
NEXTROUND: 
PRINT 

PRINT "PRESS ANY KEY TO PLAY ANOTHER ROUND."; 
WAITFORKEY: 

IF INKEY$="" THEN WAITFORKEY ELSE R=R+1:G0T0 MAINL 
OOP 



rQ- 



60 FAMILY COMPUTING 



TELL HIM WHERE TO GO. 




'-^. 




And what to do 

when he gets there. 

And what to say 

Omnibot 2000 is the 

state-of-the-fiin robot 

with a mind all your own 
Exercise remote control 

and hell deliver cocktails or 

breakfast in bed. Hell even walk the dog, 
Progr'am his T^day, 24-hour memory and 

the alter ego-driven Omnibot 2000 wll woke 

you up, pour your coffee and recite the day's 

agenda on 
his built-in 
tape system. 
Of course, 
he's always 
open to self- 
improvement. 
Add his 
optional 




photo sensor 
and heU react to r 
movement. Or / 
the infra-red / 
sensor And hell / 
react to 
obstacles. 
Then there's the 
computer interface. It 
allows you limitless progiam- 
ming potential off your own 
home computer. 

In Omnibot 2000, high 
technology serves its high- 
est purpose: You. 

For the nearest retailer, call 1-800-822-OlVINI. 
Well ten you where to go. 

OMNIBOT 2000 

THE STATE-OF-THE-FUN-ROBOT FROM TOMY; 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 48 




FsLinous Canon Mational Brand 



10" Carriage 



HI-SPEED 



15" Carriage 



PRINTER SALE 

Belavsf V^holesalG Cost Prices!!! 

• 160-180 CPS • High Speed Dot Matrix • Letter Quality Modes 

• Tractor/ Friction • 4 Character Styles • Business or Personal 
• Programmable Characters • 2K Buffer •IS Day Free Trial 

• ONE YEAR IMMEDIATE REPLA CEMENT WARRANTY 

Cheek these features & prices 

10" Printer 

List $499.00 





E^l ' 1 99 



Call for Volume Discounts 



Super Graphics! 



Print Sample 










*** NLQ PICA 


PRINTIN 


( -J 'I* *T* -V 






CANON IMPACT 


MATRIX 


PRINTER 


CANC 


C v^MNTOrsT 


X IVI IP A.OT 


I^/^TR. 



15" Prin 

List $699.00 

$249 



00 



(IBM - Commodore) 

Printing Method 

Impoci dot matrix 

Printing Speed 

160 CPS at standard character printing 

27 CPS ot NLQ charocler printirig 

Printing Direction 

Text Mode — Bi-directional 

Graphic Mode — Unidirectional 

Print Heod Life 

100 million chorocters 

Printing Characters 

Stondard 11x9 dot matrix 
I^LQ33x 18 dot matrix 
Character sire: 2 x 2.42 mm (stondardj 
Character set: Full ASCII character set (96), 
32 special Europeon chorocters 



Call for Volume Discounts 
SPECIFICATIONS (Apple - Atari - Etc.) 



Down Loading 

11 X 9 dot matrix; NLQ 23 x 1 8 dot matrix 

optional 
Print Buffer 
2K-byte utility buffer 
image Printing 

Image Data: Verticol 8. 9 and or 1 6 dot 
Resolution: Horizontal 60dotS'inch 
Horizontal i20 dots inch (double density) 
Horizontal 240 dols inch (quadruple density) 
Interface 

8-bit parallel interface (Centronics type) 
Paper 

Plain paper. Roll poper, Single sheet, 
Fontold, Multipart poper: mox. 3 sheets 
(original plus 2) 



Interfaces 



Ink Ribbon Cartridge 

Ribbon Lite: 3 million characters/cartridge 
Maximum Number of CKaracters 

SO cpl 
40 cpl 
136 cpl 
53 cpl 
96 cpl 
48 cpl 
80 cpl 
40 cpl 



Cartridge Ribbon. 

LislS29.95. Sale $19.95. 



Standard: 


10 


cpi 


Enlarged: 


5 


cpi 


Condensed: 


17.1 


cpi 


Condensed enlarged. 


8.5 


cpi 


Elite: 


12 


cpi 


Elite enlarged: 


6 


cpi 


NLQ pica: 


10 


cpi 


NLQ pica enlarged: 


5 


cpi 


Physical Dimensions 






Size: 15'4" x 12 5/8" x 


4 3/8 


•(10 


Weight: 17.6 lbs. (10") 







IBM $89.00 



Apple $59.00 



Atari $59.00 



Commodore $39.00 



Add S13.50 (S)5,00 For IS" Printers) lor shipping, handling and 
insurance. Illinois residents please add 6% tax. Add S20.00 lor 
CANADA, PUERTO RICO, HAWAII, ALASKA, APO-FPO orders, 
Conodion orders must be in U.S. dollars. WE DO NOT EXPORT TO 
OTHER COUNTRIES. EXCEPT CANADA 

Enclose Cashiers Checi*, Money Order or Personal Check, Allow Id 
days for delivery, 2 to 7 days for phone orders, I day express moil ! 
VISA MASTER CARD — C,0,D. No CO.D. to Conodo. APO-FPO 



COMPUTER DIRECT 

We Lox^e Our Customers 

22292 N. Pepper Rd., Barrington, 111. 60010 

312/382-5050 to order 



CIRCLE !?EADER SERVICE 33 



240K Apple Compatible 
# Computer System • 

$49900 



APlus 3000 computer system includes 192K RAM, 48K ROM 
(32K Microsoft Basic plus 16K ROM Emulator), 144K Laser 
5%" Disk Drive (Runs Apple II Software), Magic Window 
Wordprocessor, MagiCalc spreadsheet, Magic Memory 
Database. All for only $499.00 



15 Day Free Trial 



Complete System 

1 ( -.\-~ 1 -i-T~i; 



<< 



MACjUC W INDOW//, 
4 MAGIC MEMORY | 
MAGIC 



Aplus 3000" 
System 



SSS«S*' 





CP/M CARTRIDGE 
PORT 



• DISK DRIVE 
CONTROLLER INTERFACE 



„-„ '. PFBCT • POWER 
SOUND 1 \ -RGB -RESET ^^„^^^ 

VOLUME \ \ OUTPUT 

• COMPOSITE VIDEO 

CASSETTE 

INTERFACE 



Double immediate Replacement Warranty 

If any of the Aplus 3000 computer system 
equipment fails due to foulty workmanship or 
moterial within 180 days of purchase we will 
REPLACE it immediately with no service charge! ! 



• Over 10,000 existing Apple' programs • Centronics printer interfoce included 

• 240K (192KRAM, 48K ROM) • ArtScl's Mogic Window II, Magic Memory, and MagiCalc included 

• 144K Laser 5% " Disk Drive (Runs Apple II software) • RGB (80 columns in color) and composite included 

SPECIFICATIONS 

A plus 3000 is a complete, self-contained computer based on 
ttie popular 6502A microprocessor and can tap into the 
tremendous software library of Apple II. Features include 
192K Bytes RAM, 32KB Enhanced Microsoft BASIC. 80 column 
text. 560H X 192V color graphic disploy. 81 key sculptured 
keyboord and high efficiency switching power supply. Also 
included as standord are Centronics bus printer interface, 
Cossette interface. 4 channel sound generator, ond 5'/i" 
Apple Compatible Disk Drive. 

• TEXT 

— 40 columns X 24 rows or 80 columns X 24 rows software 
selectable. 

— 5X7 characters in 7 X 8 matrix. 

— Upper ond lower cose characters. 

— One of Eight colors for charocters/grophics and background. 
Red, Green, Blue, Cyon. Magenta. Yellow. Black ond White. 

— Character set with normal, inverse ond flashing capobilities. 

• GRAPHICS 

— 2B0HX 192V 6 colors — Block, White, Violet. Green, Blue, Orange. 

— 280HX 192V 8 colors bit image — Black. White. Red. Green. Blue, Cyan. 
Magento. Yellow. 

— 560HX 192V 6 colors — Block, White, Violet, Green, Blue, Orange. (High 
resolution color monitor required) 

Super Apple Compatible Disk Drive Sale 

Quieter, Cooler, Belter Disk Drives for your Apple 11 plus, lie, lie 
(specify when ordering). List $299.95. Sale$149.95. 

15 Day Free Trial — If it doesn't meet your expectations 

within 15 days of receipt, just send it back to us UPS 

prepaid and we will refund your purchase pricel! 



More Features than Apple 


for less than Commodore 


Commodore 


Features 




Aplus 3000 


Apple He 


128 


RAM 




192K 


64K 


128K 


Runs Apple II Softwore 




Yes 


Yes 


No 


Function Keys 




34 


None 


16 


4 Voice. 6 OclQve Sound 




Ves 


No 


Yes 


Composite Video 




Yes 


Yes 


Yes 


Disk Drive 




included 


Extra Cost 


Extra Cost 


Numeric Keypad 




Included 


Extro Cost 


Included 


Video Cable 




included 


Extra Cost 


Extra Cost 


RGB Color Card 




included 


Extra Cost 


Included 


80 Column Card 




included 


Extra Cost 


Included 


Centronics Printer Interfoce 




included 


Extro Cost 


Extra Cost 


Drive Controller 




included 


Extro Cost 


Included 


S150 Wordprocessor (Magic Wind 


Ow) 


included 


Extro Cost 


Extro Cost 


SI 50 Spreodsheet (MagiCak) 




Included 


Extro Cost 


Extra Cost 


S60 Dotabase prg. (Magic Memor 


/) 


Included 


Extra Cost 


Extra Cost 



Your Cost 



$499.00 



$1745.00 $1117.90 



ACCESSORIES 

2nd Disk Drive 

2 professional analog joysticks 

Z-80 cart, allows CP/M use 

RS232 adopter 

R/F Modulator (TV hookup) 

RGB coble (RGB Monitor hookup) 

Centronics coble (tor Centronics printer) 

Technical reference manual 

Comstar 1 Ox 120-140 CPS dot matrix printer 

80 columns Hi-Res Amber Monitor 

80 column Hi-Res RGB Monitor 



LIST 

$299.95 
$ 39.95 
$ 99.95 
S 99.95 
S 29.95 
S 24.95 
S 34.95 
S 29.95 
$399.00 
$199.00 
$399.00 



SALE 

$149.95 

S 24.95 

59.95 

59.95 

19.95 

19.95 

24.95 

19.95 

$189.00 

$ 89.95 

$279.00 



Add $25.00 for shipping and handling!! 

Enclose Cashiers Check. Money Order or Personal Check. Allow 1 4 
days for delivery. 2 to 7 doys for phone orders. 1 day express moil ! 
We accept Viso and MasterCard. We ship C.O.D. to continentol 
U.S. addresses only. Add $10 more if C.O.D. 



APPIE ond COW^WODORE are regislered IrodBmarks of AppW Cpmputer Iftc. ond Commodoie Buijness Mdchin»l, Inc.. rMp«1iv»V 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 9 



COMPUTER DIRECT 

Wc Love Our Customers 

22292 N. Pepper Rd., Borrington, 111. 60010 

312/382-5050 to order 



FUN/LEARNING PROGRAM 



Tt'99iaAlWord Wars 

10 DIM SC2) 

20 R=1 

3a RANDOMIZE 

40 CALL CLEAR 

50 PRINT TABC9>;"*W0R0 WARS*" 

60 PRINT 

70 PRINT "ROUND #";R 

80 PRINT 

90 HL=<fiND>=((.5) 

100 LN=INT(RND*3)+5 

110 AL=INT(RND*26)+65 

120 IF HL THEN 150 

130 D$="LOW£H-" 

140 GOTO 160 

150 D$="HIGHER-" 

160 PRINT "IN THIS ROUND, PLAYERS WILL" 

170 PRINT "AIM FOR ";D$;"VALUED" 

180 PRINT "WORDS. THE WORDS MUST" 

190 PRINT "BE";LK;"LETTERS LONG AND" 

200 PRINT "MUST BEGIN WITH THE" 

210 PRINT "LETTER ";CHR$(34);CHRS<AL);CHR$(34);"." 

220 FOR J=1 TO 2 

230 PRINT 

240 PRINT "YOUR WORD," 

250 PRINT "PLAYER";J; 

260 INPUT H$ 

270 IF LEN(W$)OLN THEN 240 

280 IF SEG$CW$,1,1)<>CHR$(AL)THEN 240 

290 SCJ)=0 

300 FOR K=1 TO LN 

310 S(J)=S(J3+ASCCSEG$CW$,K,1)) 

320 NEXT K 

330 NEXT J 

340 PRINT 

350 PRINT "ARE BOTH THESE WORDS IN" 

360 PRINT "YOUR DICTIONARY"; 

370 INPUT YN$ 

380 IF SEG$CYN$,1,1)<>"Y" THEN 40 

390 PRINT 

400 IF S(1><>SC2>THEN 440 

410 PRINT "BOTH THESE WORDS HAVE THE" 

420 PRINT "SAME VALUE." 

430 GOTO 470 

440 CM=(S(2)>$(1)) 

450 PRINT "PLAYER";1-(HL=CM);"UINS, WITH A" 

460 PRINT D$;"VALUED WORD." 

470 PRINT 

480 PRINT "PRESS ANY KEY TO PLAY" 

490 PRINT "ANOTHER ROUND." 

500 CALL KEYC3,KP,ST) 

510 IF ST=0 THEN 500 

520 R=R+1 

530 GOTO 40 



TRS*80 Color Computer/Mforif Wars 

10 CLEAR 580 

20 DIM S<2) 

30 fi=1 

4e CLS 

50 PRINT TAB(10);"*WORD WARS*" 

60 PRINT 

70 PRINT "ROUND #";R 

80 PRINT 

90 HL=RNDC2)-2 

100 LN=RND(4)+4 

110 AL=RND(26)+64 

12(S IF HL THEN D$="HIGHER-" ELSE D$="LOWER-" 

130 PRINT "IN THIS ROUND, PLAYERS HILL AIM" 

140 PRINT "FOR ";D$;"VALUED WORDS." 

150 PRINT "THE WORDS MUST BE"; LN; "LETTERS" 

160 PRINT "LONG AND MUST BEGIN WITH THE" 

170 PRINT "LETTER ";CHRS(34); CHRS(AL);CHR$C34);"." 

180 FOR J=1 TO 2 



190 PRINT 

200 PRINT "YOUR WORD, PLAYER"; J; 

210 INPUT WS 

220 IF LEN(W$K>LN OR LEFT$CW$,1K>CHR$(AL) THEN 200 

230 SCJ)=0 

240 FOR K=1 TO LN 

250 SCJ>=S(J)+ASCCMI0$CW$,K,1)) 

260 NEXT K 

270 NEXT J 

280 PRINT 

290 PRINT "ARE BOTH THESE WORDS IN YOUR" 

300 INPUT "DICT10NARY";YN$ 

310 IF LEFTS(YN$,1><>"Y" THEN 40 

320 PRINT 

330 IF S(1)<>SC2) THEN 370 

340 PRINT "BOTH THESE WORDS HAVE" 

350 PRINT "THE SAME VALUE." 

360 GOTO 400 

370 CM=(S(2)>SC1>) 

380 PRINT "PLAYER";1-CHL=CM);"WINS, WITH A" 

390 PRINT OS; "VALUED WORD." 

400 PRINT 

410 PRINT "PRESS ANY KEY TO PLAY ANOTHER" 

420 PRINT "ROUND." 

430 IF INKEY$="" THEN 430 ELSE R=R+1:G0T0 40 



TRS-80 Models III & 4 (w/Medei III BASIO/Word 
Wars 

10 CLEAR 500 

20 DIM SC2) 

30 R=1 

40 CLS 

50 PRINT TAB(27);"*W0RD WARS*" 

60 PRINT 

70 PRINT "ROUND #";R 

80 PRINT 

90 HL=RNDC2)-2 

100 LN=RNDC4)+4 

110 AL=RNDC26)+64 

120 IF HL THEN D$="HIGHER-" ELSE D$="LOWER-" 

130 PRINT "IN THIS ROUND, PLAYERS WILL AIM FOR" 

140 PRINT D$;"VALUEO WORDS. THE WORDS MUST" 

150 PRINT "BE";LN;"LETTERS LONG AND MUST BEGIN" 

160 PRINT "WITH THE LETTER ";CHR$(34J;CHR$<AL);CHR$(34 

' r - 

170 FOR J=1 TO 2 

180 PRINT 

190 PRINT "YOUR WORD, PLAYER"; J; 

200 INPUT W$ 

210 IF LEN<W$K>LN OR LEFT$CW$,1)<>CHR$<ALJ THEN 190 

220 SCJ)=0 

230 FOR K=1 TO LN 

240 S(J)=S(J)+ASC(MID$(W$,K,1)) 

250 NEXT K 

260 NEXT J 

270 PRINT 

280 INPUT "ARE BOTH THESE WORDS IN YOUR DICTIONARY"'YN 

S 

290 IF LEFT$(YN$,1)<>"Y" THEN 40 

300 PRINT 

310 IF S(:i)=SC2) THEN PRINT "BOTH THESE WORDS HAVE THE 

SAME VALUE.": GOTO 350 
320 CM=CS(2)>SC1)) 

330 PRINT "PLAYER";1-<HL=CM);"WINS, WITH A" 
340 PRINT D$;"VALUED WORD." 
350 PRINT 

360 PRINT "PRESS ANY KEY TO PLAY ANOTHER ROUND."; 
370 IF INKEY$="" THEN 370 ELSE R=R+1:GOT0 49 



VIC.20/IVor(f Wars 

10 DIM SC2> 

20 R=1 

30 PRINT CHR$(147); 



64 FAMILY COMPUTING 



h5h 



ARCAOe GAME 



40 PRINT TAB(5);"*W0RD WARS*" 

50 PRINT 

60 PRINT "ROUND #";R 

70 PRINT 

80 HL=(RND(0)>=0.5) 

90 LN=INTCRND<0)*5)+A 

100 AL=INTCRNDC0>*26)+65 

110 IF HL THEN D$="HIGHER-" :GOTO 130 

120 0$="LOWER-" 

130 PRINT "IN THIS ROUND," 

140 PRINT "PLATERS WILL AIM" 

150 PRINT "FOR ";DS;"VALUED" 

160 PRINT "WORDS. THE WORDS" 

170 PRINT "MUST BE"; LN; "LETTERS" 

180 PRINT "LONG AND MUST" 

190 PRINT "BEGIN WITH THE" 

200 PRINT "LETTER ";CHR$C34);CHR$(AL);CHR$C34);"." 

210 FOR J=1 TO 2 

220 PRINT 

230 PRINT "YOUR WORD," 

240 PRINT "PLAYER";J; 

249 REM --CLEAR WS FOR NEM INPUT— 

250 U$="" 
260 INPUT WS 

270 IF LEN(WI)<>LN OR LEFT$CWS,1 )<>CHR$<AL) THEN 230 

280 S(J)=0 

290 FOR K=1 TO LN 

300 S(J)=S<J)+ASC(MID$(W$,K,13> 

310 NEXT K 

320 NEXT J 

330 PRINT 

339 REK —CLEAR YNS FOR NEW INPUT— 

340 YN$="" 

350 PRINT "ARE BOTH THESE WORDS" 

360 INPUT "IN YOUR DICTIONARY"; YNS 

370 IF LEFT$(YNS,1K>"Y" THEN 30 

380 PRINT 

390 IF S(1)<>S(2) THEN 430 

400 PRINT "BOTH THESE WORDS HAVE" 

410 PRINT "THE SAME VALUE." 

420 GOTO 460 

430 CH=(S(2)>SC1)) 

440 PRINT "PLAYER";1-(HL=CM);"WINS, WITH A" 

450 PRINT DS;"VALUED WORD." 

460 PRINT 

470 PRINT "PRESS ANY KEY TO PLAY" 

480 PRINT "ANOTHER ROUND." 

490 GET KP$:IF KP$="" THEN 490 

500 R=R+1 

510 GOTO 30 



BY JOEY LATIMER 



PROGRAMMING P.S. 

Corrections to previous months' progranns 

Commodore 64 w/disk drive or Datasselte (printer 
epIionaD/ffome Informaiion Manager (August 1985. 
pages 61 — 64] 

In the September issue we recommended you make some 
changes to prevent malfunction in case you try to get or 
STORE a fllcbox that's completely empty. Here are those 
changes again, with additional ones. 

Please change lines 1690, 1850, 1860, and 1930 to 
read as follows: 

1690 ON SE-2 GOTO 1750,1800,1780 

1850 FOR J = 1 TO FT:PRINTS2,CHRSC34);F$U);CHRSC34):NEX 

T J:IF RT=0 THEN 1870 

1860 FOR J=1 TO RT*FT:PRINT#2,CHR$C34);Y$CJ);CHR$C34): 

NEXT J 

1930 FOR J=1 TO FT:INPUT«(2,F$(J):NEXT J:IF RT=0 THEN 1 

950 

Also, add line 1955; 

1955 MAX=0:IF FT>0 THEN MAX=INT(2700/FT) 



-Gi 




Get 'Em is a fast-paced 
game, guaranteed to give 
your reflexes a workout. As 
in a western, the object is 
to "Get 'em before they get 
away!" But instead of chas- 
ing bank robbers, in Get 
'Em you try to hit valuable 
targets before they turn 
into less precious, or even 
harmful, ones. 

On the left side of the 
screen, a puck boLinces up 
and down. On the right. 
separated by deadly bars. 
are the targets, which 



change every moment. On 
all systems but the Macin- 
tosh (which uses graphic 
figures), the targets are 
characters — " > ", "*", "S", 
and " " — which add or sub- 
tract different points from 
your score when hit. To go 
for a target, press the 
space bar when you think 
the puck is lined up prop- 
erly. This will send it 
shooting sideways toward 
the targets. If you miss one 
and hit a bar, you lose — so 
be careful! 



ADAM/Cef 'Em 

10 LOHEK: 29000 
20 DIM d$C4),tr(19> 

29 REM —TURN OFF CURSOR— 

30 POKE 16953,0 

40 hs = 0:s = 0:sp$ = CHH$(3Z) 

50 FOR i = 1 TO 4; READ d$Ci>:NEXT i 

60 FOR i = 28000 TO 28012: READ a: POKE i, a: NEXT i 

70 HOME 

80 PRINT "Score:0";TABC15);"High Score:"; hs 

90 HTAB 2:INVERSE:PRINT SPCC29) 

100 FOR i = 3 TO 21:VTA8 i:HTAB 2:PRINT sp$ 

110 VTAB i:HTAB 30:PRINT sp$:NEXT i 

120 HTAB 2:PR1NT SPCC29) :NORHAL: PRINT 

130 PRINT "Pnts: +=100 *=250 S=500 /=-100"; 

140 INVERSE:c = 2:j = 20: FOR i = 4 TO 20 STEP 2 

150 VTAB i:HTAa j:PRINT SPC(30-j); 

160 trCc) = i:j = j+1-2*(i >= 12) 

170 c = c+2:NEXT i: NORMAL 

180 FOR i = 3 TO 21 STEP 2 

190 q = ABSaNTCRNDC1)*8)-3):IF q = THEN q = 1 

200 VTAB ■i:HTAB 29:PRINT d$<q); : tr(i-2) = q:NEXT i 

209 REM —"CALL 28007" PREPARES FOR KEYPRESS- 

210 f = 1:a = 4:d = INT(RND<1)*18)+3:CALL 28007 
220 VTAB d:HTAB a:lNVERSE:PRINT sp$;:NORMAL 

229 REM ~"PEEK(64885V' TELLS LATEST KEYPRESS— 

230 IF PEEK(64885) = 32 THEN CALL 28007:GOTO 340 
240 t = INT(RNDC1)*19)+3:IF L/Z = INTCL/2) THEN 270 
250 q = ABS<INT<RNDC1)*8)-3):IF q = THEN q = 1 
260 VTAB L:HTAB 29:PRINT dSCq); : tr< 1-2) = q 

270 VTAB d:HTAB a:PRINT sp$; 

280 d = d+f:IF d > 3 AND d < 21 THEN 220 

289 REM —THIS POKE AND CALL MAKE A SOUND— 

290 i = -f:POKE 28006,144: CALL 28000 _ 
300 POKE 28006,141: CALL 2800« *" 



MO\'EMBER 1985 65 




ARCADE GAME 



tr(d-2):G0T0 360 



3ia POKE 28f»6,34-»-f:CALL 28003 

320 FOR t = 1 TO 5: NEXT trPOKE 28M6,159:CALL 28{>00 
330 GOTO 220 

340 IF d/2 - IWT<d/2> THEN nd 
350 nd = 29 
360 VTAB d:HTAB a: PRINT spS; 
370 a = a+1:IF a = nd THEN 390 

3S0 VTAB d:HTAB a: INVERSEiPRINT sp$; : NORMAL: GOTO 360 
390 IF nd <> 29 THEN 500 
400 p$ = d$(tr(d-2J) 

410 pt = 50-25*(p$ = "*")-40*(p$ = "+")-60*Cp$ = "/") 
420 V = SGN(pt):x = 50-20*Cv < 0) 
430 POKE 28006,144: CALL 28000 
440 FOR i = u TO pt STEP v:s = s+v*10 
450 VTAB 1:HTAB 8: PRINT s;spS; 
460 POKE 28006, 128:CALL 28000 
470 POKE 28006,x:CALL 28000 
480 X = x-v:NEXT i:POKE 28006, 159:CALL 28000 
•490 GOTO 210 

500 POKE 28006, 128:CALL 28000 
510 POKE 28006, 50;CALL 280«0 
520 POKE 28006,144: CALL 28000 
530 FOR t = 1 TO 100: NEXT t 
540 POKE 28006, 159: CALL 28000 
550 HO«E:PfiINT "Sorry, you missed!" 
560 PRINT:PRINT "Your score: ";s 
570 PRINT:PRINT "High score: "; hs 
580 IF s <= hs THEN 610 
590 hs = s:PRINT:PRINT "Congratulations!" 
600 PRINT:PRINT "You beat the high score!" 
610 PRINT:PRINT "Press <E> to end, or" 
620 PRINT "any other key to pLay again." 
630 GET kpS 

639 REM —"POKE 16953,95" TURNS CURSOR BACK 0N~ 

640 IF kpS = "E" OR kp$ = "e" THEN POKE 16953,95:END 
650 s = 0:GQTO 70 

1000 DATA +,*,$,/ 

2000 DATA 58,102,109,211,255,201,0,62,0,50,117,253,201 



Apple II series/Cef 'Cm 

10 iJIH D$(B) 

20 HS = 0:3 = 0:SPS = CHR$<32) 

30 FOR I = TO 36:READ A:POKE 768+1, AjNEXT I 

40 FOR I = 1 TO 8:READ 0$(I):NEXT I 

50 H0ME:PR1NT " SCORE: 0";TABC21 );"HIGH SCORE: "; HS 

60 INVERSE:PRINT SPCC38) :PR1NT 

70 FOR 1 = 1 TO 19:PRINT SP$;:HTAB 38:PRINT SP$:NEJ(T I 

80 PRINT SPCC38):PRiNT:N0RMAL 

90 PRINT " POINTS: +=100 *=250 $=500 /=~100"; 

100 INVERSE:J = 25:FOR I = 4 TO 20 STEP 2 

110 VTAB I:HTAB J:PRINT SPC<38-J) 

120 J = J+1-2*(I >= 12):NEXT I:NORMAL 

130 FOR I = 5 TO 21 STEP 2:VTAB I:HTAB 37 

140 PRINT D$CINTCRNDC1)*8)+1>:NEXT I 

150 F = 1:A = 4:D = INT(RND(1)*17)+3:P0KE -16368,0 

160 VTAB D:HTAB A: INVERSEtPRINT SP$;:NORMAL 

170 IF PEEKC-16384) = 160 THEN POKE -16368, 0:GOTO 240 

180 L = INT<RND<1)*19)+3:IF L/2 = INT<L/2) THEN 200 

190 VTAB L:HTAB 37:PR1NT DSCINT(RN0C1 )*8)+1) 

200 VTAB D:HTAB A:PRINT SPS; 

210 D = D+F:IF > 3 AND D < 21 THEN 160 

220 F = -F 

230 POKE 8,70-10*F:POKE 6,2:CALL 768:G0T0 160 

240 VTAB D:HTAB A:PR1NT SP$;:A = A+1 

250 P = SCRN(A-1,2*<D-1))+16*SCRN(A-1,2*(D-1)+1)-128 

260 IF P <> 32 THEN 280 

270 VTAB D:HTAB A: INVERSE: PRINT SPS; :NOR«AL:GOT0 240 

280 IF P = -96 THEN 360 

290 PS = CHR$(P) 



300 PT = 50-25*(P$ = "*")-40*CP$ = "+")-60*(P$ 
310 V = SGN(PT):X = 50+60*(V > 0) 
320 FOR I = V TO PT STEP V 
0)330 S = S+V*10:VTAB 1:HTAB 9:PRINT S;SP$ 
^[340 POKE 8,X:P0KE 6,1: CALL 768 



V") 




350 X = X-V+4*<V < 0):NEXT I:GOTO 150 

360 POKE 8,200:POK:E 6,100:CALL 768 

370 HOME:PRINT "SORRY, YOU MISSED!" 

380 PRINT:PRINT "YOUR SCORE: "; S 

390 PRINT:PRINT "HIGH SCORE: "; HS 

400 IF S <= HS THEN 430 

410 HS = S:PRINT:PRINT "CONGRATULATIONS!" 

420 PRINT:PfiINT "YOU BEAT THE HIGH SCORE!" 

430 PRINT:PRINT "PRESS <E> TO END OR ANY" 

440 PRINT "OTHER KEY TO PLAY AGAIN."; 

450 GET K$:IF KS = "E" THEN END 

460 S = 0:GOTO 50 

1000 DATA 165,8,201,2,176,2,169,2,74,133,10,164,8 

1010 DATA 240,8,173,48,192,234,234,136,208,251,56 

1020 DATA 165,7,229,10,133,7,176,235,198,6,208,231,96 

2000 DATA +,+,*,*,$,/,/,/ 



Atari 400, 800, 600/800XL, & 130XE/«e» '£nt 

10 DIM C$(36),D$(8),TSC1J,P$(1),SP$C1),LO(4,2),CHC4) 
20 OPEN #1,4,0,"K:":OPEN #6,12, 0,"S:" 
30 POKE 82,0:POKE 752,1 

40 C$=CHR$C160):C$(36)=C$:C$(2)=C$:SP$=CHR$C32> 

50 HS=0:S=0 

60 FOR 1=1 TO 8:READ T$:D$CLEN<D$)+1)=TS:NEXT I 

70 FOR 1=1 TO 4:READ A,B,C 

80 CHa)=A:L0Cl,1)=B:L0(I,2)=C:NEXT I 

90 PRINT CHR$<125); 

100 POSITION 3,0:PRIHT "SCORE: 0" 

110 POSITION 19,0:PRINT "HIGH SCORE: ";HS 

120 PRINT SPS; SPS; C$: FOR 1=2 TO 20 

130 POSITION 1,I:PRINT CHR$C160) 

140 POSITION 38,I:PRINT CHR$C160) :NEXT I 

150 PRINT SPS; SPS; C$ 

160 PRINT " POINTS: +=100 *=250 $=500 /=-100",- 

170 FOR 1=1 TO 4:P0SITI0N L0CI,1 ),L0(I,2) 

180 PRINT CHR$CCH(I));:NEXT I 

190 J=13:F0R 1=3 TO 19 STEP 2 

200 "POSITION 38-J,l:PRINT CS<1,J) 

210 J=J-1+2*CI>=11):NEXT I 

220 FOR 1=2 TO 20 STEP 2:P0SITI0N 37,1 

230 N=INT(RNDC0)*S)+1:PRINT D$(N,N):NEXT I 

240 POKE 764,255:F=1:A=4:D=INT(RND(1)*16H3 

250 POSITION A,D;PRINT CHR$C160); 

260 K=PEEKC764):IF K=33 THEN POKE 764,255: GOTO 330 

270 L=IMT(RNDC1>*19)+2:IF L/20INTCL/2J THEN 290 

280 POSITION 37,L:N=INT<RND<1)*8)+1:PRINT D$(N,N) 

290 POSITION A,D: PRINT SPS; 

300 D=D+F:IF D>2 AND D<20 THEN 250 

310 F=-F:SOUND 0,100-7*F,10,8 

320 FOR T=1 TO 5: NEXT T: SOUND 0,0,0,0: GOTO 250 

330 POSITION A,D:PRINT SPS; 

340 A=A+1:L0CATE A,D,P:IF P<>32 THEN 360 

350 POSITION A,D:PR1NT CHR$C160);:GOTO 330 

360 IF P=160 THEN 430 

370 P$=CHRS(P) 

380 PT=50-25*CP$="*")-40*CP$="+")-60*CPS="/") 

390 V=SGN(PT):X=50+150*(PT>0) 

400 FOR I=V TO PT STEP V:S=S+V*10 

410 POSITION 10,0:PRINT S;SP$;:SOUNO 0,X,10,8 

420 X=X+S-9*(V>0):NEXT I: SOUND 0,0,0,0;GOTO 240 

430 SOUND 0,200,10,8 

440 FOR DE=1 TO 15:NEXT DE:SOUND 0,0,0,0 

450 PRINT CHR$(125);:PRINT "SORRY, YOU HISSEB!" 

460 PRINT :PRINT "YOUR SCORE: "; S 

470 PRINT :PRINT "HIGH SCORE; ";HS 

480 IF S<=HS THEN 510 

490 HS=S:PRINT :PRINT "CONGRATULATIONS!" 

500 PRINT :PRINT "YOU BEAT THE HIGH SCORE!" 

510 PRINT :PRINT "PRESS <RETURN> TO PLAY AGAIN." 

520 GET #1,K:IF K0155 THEN 520 

530 S=0:GOTO 90 

1000 DATA +,+,*,*,S,/,/,/ 

1010 DATA 8,1,1,10,38,1,138,1,21,136,38,21 



^ 



66 FAMILY COMI'UT[NG 



Commodore 64 & 128 (G 64 mode}/Cer 'Em 

10 DIM D$(8),L0(4),CHC4) 

20 HS=0:S=0:SB=1024:SID=54272 

30 POKE 53281 ,0:POKE 53280,0 

40 FOR I=SI[> TO SID+23:P0KE I,0:NEXT I 

50 POKE SID+24,15:POKE SID+5,68: POKE SID+6,68 

60 R$=CHR$(18):SP$=CHR$C32) 

70 SS=RS+CHR3(31)+SP$:C$=R$+CHR$C28) 

80 FOR 1=1 TO 39:C$=CJ+SPS:NEXT I 

90 FOR 1=1 TO 3;R£AD C,D$CI) 

100 D$(I)=CHR$(CJ+D$(1):NEXT I 

110 FOR 1=1 TO 4:READ LO(I),CH(I) :NEXT I 

120 PRINT CHR$(147); 

130 PRINT TA8C5);CHR$(154);"SC0RE:";CHR$(1S8);S; 

140 PRINT TAB(20);CHR$C154);"HIGH SCOBE:";CHR$(1S85;HS 

150 PRINT C$:FOR 1=1 TO 21 

160 PRINT R$;CHR$(128>;SP$;TAB(38);SP$;NEXT I 

170 PRINT CS 

180 PRINT CHRS(154);" POINTS: ";D$C1);"=100 "; 

190 PRINT D$(35;"=250 ";D$C5>;"=500 ";O$(6);"=-100"; 

200 FOR 1=1 TO 4:P0KE LO(I),CH(I) 

210 POKE L0(I)+54272,2:NEXT I 

220 J=25:FOR 1=2 TO 10 STEP 2:P0KE 214,I:PRINT 

230 PRINT TAB(J3;LEFT$CC$,40-J) 

240 PCKE 214,22-I:PRINT 

250 PRINT TAB<JJ;LEFTSCC$,40-J):J=J+1:NEXT 1 

260 FOR 1=1 TO 21 STEP 2:P0KE 214,I:PRINT 

270 PRINT TAB(37);D$aNTCRN0(1)*8>+1):NEXT I 

280 F=1:A=4:D=INT<RND(1)*18)+3 

290 POKE 214,0:PR1NT:PRINT TABCA>;SS; 

300 GET KS:IF K$=SPS THEN 370 

310 L=INT(RNDC1>*21)+1:IF L/2=INT(L/2) THEN 330 

320 POKE 214,L:PRINT:PRINT TAB<37);D$CINTCRNDC1)*8)+1) 

330 POKE 214,D:PRINT:PRINT TAB(A);SPS; 

340 D=D+F:IF D>1 AND D<21 THEN 290 

350 F=-F;POKE SID+1 ,35+7*F:P0KE SID+4,17 

360 FOR T=1 TO 5:NEXT T:POKE SID+4,0:GOTO 290 

370 POKE 214,D:PRINT:PRINT TABCAJ;SP$; 

380 A=A+1:P=PEEK(SB+A+(D+1)*40):IF P032 THEN 400 

390 POKE 214,D:PRINT:PRINT TABCA); S$;G0TO 370 

400 IF P=160 THEN 510 

410 P$=CHR$(P) 

420 PT=50+25*(P$="*")+40*CP$="+")+60*(P$="/") 

430 V=SGN<PT):X=50+40*(V>0> 

440 PCXE SID+1 ,0:PCKE SID+4,33 

450 FOR 1=V TO PT STEP V 

460 S=S+V*10 

470 PRINT CHRSC19);TAB(11);RIGHT$<C$,5) 

480 PRINT CHR$C19);TABC11);CHRS(158);S 

490 POKE SID+1, X 

500 X=X+V+4*(V<0):NEXT IjPOKE SIC+4,0:GOTO 280 

510 POKE SID+1,9:P0KE SID+4,33 

520 FOR Q=1 TO 15:NEXT Q:POKE SID+4,0 

530 PRINT CHR$C147);CHR$C5);"S0RRY, YOU MISSED!" 

540 PRINT:PRINT "YOUR SCORE: ";S 

550 PRINT:PRIKT "HIGH SCORE: ";HS 

560 IF S<=HS THEN 590 

570 HS=S:PRINT:PRINT "CONGRATULATIONS!" 

580 PRINT:PRINT "YOU BEAT THE HIGH SCORE!" 

590 PRINT:PRINT "PRESS <RETURN> TO PLAY AGAIN." 

600 GET K$:IF K$<>CHfiS(13) THEN 600 

610 S=0:6OTO 120 

1000 DATA 4,+,5,*,6,$,7,/,4,+,5,*,7,/,7,/ 

1010 DATA 1064,233,1102,223,1944,95,1982,105 



IBM PC & compatibles*/Cef 'Mm 

10 DIM D$(8>,C(8) 

20 WIDTH 40:KEY 0FF:5CREEN 0,1:LOCATE 1,1,0 

30 HS=0:S=0:SPS=CHRS(32> 

40 FOR 1=1 TO 8:READ CCI>,0$(I) :NEXT I 

50 CLS:COLOR 14:PRINT " SC0RE:";TAB(19);"HIGH SCORE: 

60 LOCATE 1,9:C0L0R 15:PR1NT S 

70 LOCATE 1,30:COLOR 7:PR1NT HS 

80 COLOR 4:PRINT STR1NG$C39,219) 



90 FOR 1=1 TO 19 

100 PRINT CHR$C219);SPC(37J;CHft$(219):NEXT I 

110 PRINT STRING$(39,219) 

120 COLOR 14 

130 PRINT " POINTS: +=100 *=250 $=500 /=-100"; 

140 COLOR 4:J=25:FOR 1=4 TO 20 STEP 2 

150 LOCATE I,J:PRINT STRING$(40-J,219) 

160 J=J+1+2*CI>=12):NEXT I 

170 FOR 1=3 TO 21 STEP 2:D=INT(RND*3)+1 

180 COLOR CCD);LOCATE I,37:PR1NT DS(D):NEXT I 

190 F=1:A=4:D=INT(RND*18+3) 

Zm COLOR 1:L0CATE D,A:PRINT CHR$(219> 

210 K$=INKEY$:IF K$=SP$ THEN 270 

220 L=INTCRND*19)+3:1F L MOD 2=0 THEN 240 

230 R=INT(RND*8)+1:L0CATE L,37:C0L0R CCR):PRINT D$(R) 

240 LOCATE D,A:PRINT SP$ 

250 D=D+F:IF D>3 AND D<21 THEN 200 

260 F=-F; SOUND 400+50*F, .S:GOTO 200 

270 LOCATE D,A:PRINT SP$ 

280 A=A+1:P=SCREEN(D,A):IF P<>32 THEN 310 

290 LOCATE D,A:COLOR 1:PRiNT CHR$C219) 

300 FOR T=1 TO 3: NEXT T:GOT0 270 

310 IF P=219 THEN 380 

320 P$=CHR$(P) 

330 PT=50+25*CP$="*")+40*CP$="+")+6a*(P$="/") 

340 V=SGNCPT>:X=800+700*<V>0) 

350 FOR I=V TO PT STEP V 

360 S=S+V*10:COLOR 7:L0CATE 1,9:PRINT S;SP$ 

370 SOUND X,1:X=X+V*10+40*CV<0):NEXT I:G0T0 190 

380 SOUND 200,5 

390 CLS: COLOR 15:PRINT "SORRY, YOU HISSED!" 

400 PR1NT:PRINT "YOUR SCORE:"; S 

410 PRINT:PRINT "HIGH SCORE:"HS 

420 IF S<=HS THEN 450 

430 HS=S:PRINT:PRINT "CONGRATULATIONS!" 

440 PRINT:PRINT "YOU BEAT THE HIGH SCORE!" 

450 PRINT: PRINT "PRESS <ENTER> TO PLAY AGAIN." 

460 K$=INKEYS:IF K$<>CHR$(13) THEN 460 

470 S=0:GOTO 50 

1000 DATA 4,+,5,*,6,$,7,/,4,+,5,*,r,/,7,/ 

^Tliia program has been tested on thefoltowtng compuiers. using the BASICS 
shown: IBM PC wlColor Criiphlcs Adapter. wIDHik iJASJC O2.00 or Advanced BASIC 
A2.00. IBM PCjr. wlCartrtdge BASIC JI.OO. Taridif 1000. wiGW -HASIC 2.02 version 
00.05.tXi. 



Macintosh w/Microsoft BASIC 2.0/6ef '£m 



-Oe 



SETUP: 

DIM T^(65),TRX(19) 

HS=0:S=0:GOTTEN=0 

WINDOW 1,"*6ET 'EM!*" 
DRAWHAINSCREEN: 

CLSrPRINT TAB(6);"Score: 



0";TAB(40);"High Score;' 



HS; 



LOCATE 18,1:PRINT TAB(6);"Points:"; 

PRINT TAB(20);"=100";TABC30);"=250"; 

PRINT TAB<4a);"=500";TA8<50>;"=-100"; 

LINE C20,20)-<460,268),33,BF 

LINE (30,30)-(450,258),30,BF 

J=150:C=2 

FOR 1=42 TO 138 STEP 24 

LINE C4S0-J,I+1)-C450,I+11),33,BF:TRXCC>=450-J 
LINE (450-J, 277-1)- C450,287-I), 33, BF:TRJ:C20-C)=4 
50-J 

J=J-10:C=C+2 
NEXT 1 
REM —DRAW TARGETS — 

FOR 1=140 TO 380 STEP 80 

LINE CI,274)-CI+10,284),,B 
NEXT I 

LINE C225,274)-C225,284) 
LINE C300,279)-C310,279) 
LINE (380,274)-(390,284) 
IF GOTTEN THEN PUTTARGETS 
REM —STORE TARGET IMAGES IN ARRAY VA— 
C=0 
FOR 1=140 TO 380 STEP 80 ^. 



NOVEMBER 1S85 67 




ARCADE GAME 



GET <I,274)-(1+10,284),TX(C*13) :C=C+1 
NEXT I 

GET (2»,20)-C3B,30),T5!(52) :G0TTEN=-1 
PUTTARGETS: 

FOR 1=1 TO 19 STEP 2 
GOSUB DISTRIBUTION 
PUT (438,I*12+19),T5:CQ*13):TRX<I)=Q 
NEXT 1 
START: 

F=12:A=50:D=(1NT(RND*18)+1)*12+19 
HAINLOOP: 

WHILE INKEY$OCHR$C32) 
PUT (A,D),T%(52) 

I=INT<RND*2»)+1:IF I MOD 2=8 THEN NOTARG 
REM —PUT NEW TARGET ON SCREEN— 

J=I*12+19:PUT C438,J),TX(TfiXCI)*13) 
GOSUB DISTRIBUTION 
PUT (43a^J),T5iCQ*13):TR31(I)=Q 
NOTARG: 

PUT CA,D),T%<52) 

D=D+F:IF D=31 OR D=247 THEN F=-F:SOUND 44e+F,1,8 
WENO 
REM --MAKE PUCK MOVE TOWARD TARGETS— 
P=(D-19)/12 

IF P MOD 2=0 THEN L«=TRXCP) ELSE LH=438 
WHILE A<Lfl 

PUT <A,D),T%C52):PUT <A,D),T%(S2):A=A+5 
WEND 

REM —CALCULATE VALUE OF TARGET; MODIFY SCORE— 

IF LH0438 THEN ENDGAME 

TARGET=TRX<P) 

PT=10-15*(TARGET=1)-4ffl*<TARGET=2)+2C*(TARGET=3) 

V=SGN(PT):X=500+V*10 

FOR I=V TO PT STEP V 

S=S+V*10:LOCATE 1,1:PRINT PTAB(80);S 
SOUND X,1^10:X=X+V*10 

NEXT I 

GOTO START 
ENDGAME: 

CLS: SOUND 200,20,10 

PRINT "Sorry, you missed! ":PRINT 

PRINT "Your score:"; S 

PRINT "High score:";HS 

IF S<=HS THEN PLAYA6AIN 

HS=S:PRINT "Congratulations!" 

PRINT "You beat the high score!":PRINT 
PLAY AGAIN: 

PRINT:PRINT "Press <RETURN> to pLay again." 

WHILE INKEY$<>CHR$C13) 

WEND 

S=B:GOTO DRAWHAINSCREEN 
DISTRIBUTION: 

N=INTCRND*8) 

Q=-(CK=2 OR N=3)+2*CN=4)+3*(N>4)) 

RETURN 



TRS'SO Color Compirter/Gef 'Em 

10 CLEAR 500 
20 DIM D$<8) 

30 HS=0:S=0:SP$=CHR$C32):C$=CHR$C191) 
40 FOR 1=2 TO 31:C$=C$+CHR$(191):NEXT I 
50 FOR 1=1 TO 8:READ D$(I):NEXT 1 
60 CLS:PRINT "SCORE: HIGH SCORE:";HS 
70 PRINT CS:FOR 1=1 TO 11 

80 PRINT CHfi$(191);TAB(30);CHR$(191):NEXT I:PRINT C$ 
90 PRINT "POINTS: +=100 *=250 $=500 /=-100"; 
100 J =15: FOR 1=62 TO 384 STEP 64 
110 PRINTai-J,L£FT$<C$,J); 
120 J=J-1-2*<I>=254):NEXT 1 
130 FOR 1=92 TO 412 STEP 64 
140 PRINTai,DS(RND(8>);:NEXT I 
150 F=32:D=RNDC10)*32+36 
A 160 PRINTSID,CHR$(191); 
<^n70 KS=INKEYS:IF K$=SP$ THEN 210 



180 PRINTaRND(6)*64+28,0$(RND(8)); 

190 PRINTaD,SP$;:D=D+F:IF D>68 AND 0<388 THEN 160 

200 F=-F:SOUND 200+F/3,1 :GQTO 160 

210 PRINTaD,SP$;:D+D+1:P=PEEK(1024+O):IF P<>96 THEN 23 



220 PRINTaD,CHR$C191);:F0R T=1 TO 5:NEXT T:GOTO 210 

230 IF P=191 THEN 290 

240 PT=50+25*CP=106)+40*CP=107)+60*CP=111) 

250 V=SGN<PT):X=150+50*CV>0) 

260 FOR I=V TO PT STEP V 

270 S=S+V*10:PRINTa6,S;SP$;: SOUND X,1 

280 X=X+V*3;NEXT I:G0TO 150 

290 SOUND 50,4 

300 CLS:PRINT "SORRY, YOU MISSED!" 

310 PRINT:PRINT "YOUR SCORE:";S 

320 PRINT:PR1NT "HIGH SCORE:";HS 

330 IF S<=HS THEN 360 

340 HS=S;PRINT;PRINT "CONGRATULATIONS!" 

350 PRINT:PRINT "YOU BEAT THE HIGH SCORE!" 

360 PRINT: PRINT "PRESS <ENTER> TO PLAY AGAIN." 

370 KS=INKEY$:IF KS<>CHR$C13; THEN 370 

380 S=0:GOTO 60 

1000 DATA +,+,*,*,$,/,/,/ 



TRS-80 Models III & 4 (w/Model III BASIO/Gef 'Mm 

10 CLEAR 500 

20 DIM DS(8),L0(4>,CH(4) 

30 HS=0:S=0:SB=15360:SP$=CHRS(32> 

40 FOR 1=1 TO 8:READ D$C1):NEXT I 

50 FOR 1=1 TO 4:READ L0(1),CH(I) :NEXT I 

60 CLS 

70 PRINT TAB(5);"SC0RE: 0";TAB(30);"HIGH SCOR£:";HS 

80 PRINT STRING$(63,191>:F0R 1=128 TO 768 STEP 64 

90 PRINTai,CHRI(19iy:PRINTal+62,CHR$<191) 

100 NEXT I:PRINT STRINGS(63,191> 

110 PRINT TAB<6);"P0INTS: +=100 *=250 $=5 

00 /=-100" 

120 fOR 1=1 TO 4:PRINTaL0Cn,CHR$<CH(I>);:NEXT I 

130 J=20:FOH 1=255 TO 767 STEP 128 

140 PRINTai-J,STRlNG$CJ,191); 

150 J=J-3-6*CI>=511):NEXT I 

160 FOR 1=189 TO 829 STEP 128 

170 PRINTai,D$CRND{8));:NEXT I 

180 F=64:D=RND<9)*64+133 

190 PRINTaD,CHR$C191); 

200 KS=INKEY$:IF K$=SPS THEN 260 

210 L=RNDC11)+1:IF L/2<>INT(L/2) THEN 230 

220 PRINTa61+L*64,D$CRND(8)); 

230 PRINTaD,SP$; 

240 D=D+F:IF 0=133 OR 0=773 THEN F=-F 

250 GOTO 190 

260 PRINTaD,SP$; :0=D+1 :P=PEEKCSB+0) 

270 IF P=32 THEN PRINTaD,CHR$a91); :G0TO 260 

280 IF P=191 THEN 330 

290 PI=CHR$(P) 

300 PT=50+25*(P$="*">+40*(P$="+")+60*CP$="/") 

310 V=SGN(PT):FOR I=V TO PT STEP V 

320 S=S+10*V:PRINTai'!,S;SP$;:NEXT I:GOT0 180 

330 CLS:PRINT "SORRY, YOU MISSED!" 

340 PRINT:PRINT "YOUR SCORE:";S 

350 PRINT:PRINT "HIGH SCORE:";HS 

360 IF S<=HS THEN 390 

370 HS=S:PRINT:PRINT "CONGRATULATIONS!" 

380 PRINT:PRINT "YOU BEAT THE HIGH SCORE!" 

390 PRINT:PRINT "PRESS <ENTER> TO PLAY AGAIN." 

400 K$=INKEYS:IF K$<>CHR$(13) THEN 400 

410 S=0:GOTO 60 

1000 DATA +,+,*,*,$,/,/,/ 

1010 DATA 64,190,126,189,832,175,894,159 



kb 



68 FAMiLY COMPUTING 



MUST LIQUIDATE ^^Z^T 

TOTAL Personal Computer system 



Factory Reconditioned witii 
Factory Warranty! 




Carries easily 
as a suitcase! 
Plugs into 115V outlet! 



GREAT Grrr idea 
FOR STUDENTSI 




Sorry f we're not permitted to PRINT the famous brand-name, 
BUT, we CAN "tell all" if you call us TOLL FREE: 1-800-328-0609! 



THE COMPUTER 

Snap-on coitipulBF keyboardi 64K RAM, 20K ROM. Full- 
size typewriter keyboarci. Upper and lower case 
letters, numerals, symbols, reverse characters. 2 
cursor control keys, 4 function keys, programma- 
ble to 8. Music synthesizer with 3 independent 
voices, each with 9 octave range. Input/output ports 
accommodate . . . user, serial, ROM cartridge, joy- 
sticks, external monitor, phone modem. 
Built-in disk drivel Intelligent high speed unit with 
SVt" floppy disk recorder. 170K formatted data stor- 
age; 35 tracks. 16K ROM. Uses single sided, single 
density disk. Serial interface. Second serial port to 
chain second drive or printer. 

Buill-in colof monltDr I Displays 40 columns x 25 lines 
of text on 5" screen. High resolution. 320 x 200 pix- 
els. 16 background, character colors. 

Built-in RDM cartridge gortl Insert ROM program car- 
tridge. Multitude of subjects available in stores 
across the nation! 



Original List Price 



•995.00 



$ 



Liquidation 

Priced 

At Only 

Hem H.820.63631 00 Ship, handling; S20.00 



388 



THE PRINTER 

Prim meftiod: Bi-directional impact doi matrix. 

Character matrix: 6 x 7 dot matrix. 

Characters: Upper and lower case letters, numerals 

and symbols. All PEI graphic characters. 

Graphics: 7 vertical dots — maximum 480 columns. 

Oof addressable. 

Cliaracler codes: CBM ASCII code. 

Print speed: 60 characters per second. 

Maxiinum columns: SO columns. 

Ctiaracler spacing: 10 characters per inch. 

Line feed spacing: 6 lines per inch in character mode 

or B lines per inch selectable. 9 lines per inch in 

graphics mode. 

Line feed speed: 5 lines per second in character mode. 

7-5 lines per second in graphics mode. 

Paper feed: Friction feed. 

Paper width: 4,5' to 8,5" width. 

Multiple copies: Original plus maximum of two copies. 

Oimensions: 13"W x 8"D x 3'.V'H. Wt.: 6'.2 lbs. Power: 

120V AC. 60 Hz. 

Original List Price: ^200.00 



THE SOFTWARE 

"Easy Script" One of the most powerful word pro- 
cessors at any price! Cut re-typing, create docu- 
ments from standard paragraphs, do personalized 
letters, see and change a document before it is print- 
ed. Instruction manual has extensive training sec- 
tion that simplifies use , , . even for someone who 
has never used a computer or word processor before! 
"The Manager" A sophisticated database manager 
for business or home use. Business uses: accounts 
payable/receivaPle, inventory, appointments, task 
manager. Home uses: mailing lists, home inventory, 
recipes, collection organizer, investment tracking, 
checkbook balancing. School uses: research arti- 
cle index, gradehook. 



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lOYSTICKS (Set of 2) 64 MODEM 

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rEATURE PROGRAM 



HOME INFOR/WKTION MANAGER 
Put YDur Files on a Floppy Disk 
with This AAini-IData-Base Program 
for the Apple 



PROGRAM BY STEVEN CM. CHEN 
INTRODUCTION BY LANCE PAAVOLA 




Since publishing the Com- 
modore 64 version of 
Home Information Man- 
ager in tl-ie August issue of 

FAM I I.Y C OM I'UTiNG , we've 

been besieged with re- 
quests from readers Jor 
translations for other com- 
puters. So. this month. 
we're presenting an Apple 
version of the program. 
An IBM version will ap- 
pear in a future issue. 

COMMODORE 64 OWN- 
ERS: Be sure to check Pro- 
grammitig P.S. this month 
(page 65) Jor some correc- 
tions you might ivant to 
make to the C 64 version. 

Home Information Man- 
ager is an electronic filing 
program that helps you 
gather files onto a slim, 
neat, portable disk, and 
print out a hard copy 
whenever you want. Try it 
if you're not ready to buy a 
commercial data-base pro- 
gram yet. Maybe you're un- 
sure whether storing your 
records electronically 
makes sense, or all you 
think you'll want to com- 
puterize is your 100-name 
Christmas card list. It may 
take awhile to tjipe in, but 
when you're finished, it's a 
program you can use every 
day. You can pinpoint a 
particular piece of informa- 
tion without having to 
thumb through it all. You 
can make changes without 
mess. And you can consoli- 
date your files in one place. 

THE FIRST STEPS 

Begin by carefully typing 
In and SAVEing the pro- 
gram. (See Tips to the 
Typist, page 56. Jor help 
loith typing in programs.) 
jYou may also wish to SAV'E 
a second (backup) copy of 



the program on a separate 
disk at this lime. Before 
you KUN the program, 
make sure your printer (if 
you have one) Is connected 
and turned on. 

Don't be discouraged if 
the program doesn't run 
the first time; with such a 
long program. youYe 
bound to make typing er- 
rors. LIST It on the printer 
and proofread carefully. 
When you've got the pro- 
gram running, save; the fi- 
nal version and make a 
backup. 

You can save your own 
data on the same disk as 
your working copy of Home 
Information Manager. If 
you prefer to keep your 
data on separate disks, get 
the disks now, format 
them, and label appropri- 
ately (e.g., MOM, DAD, JODY: 
or FINANCIAL, PERSONAL). 

Before you transfer im- 
portant records to your 
Home Information Man- 
ager disks, test the pro- 
gram by creating a few 
sample fllcboxes and filling 
in some info. When you're 
confident you've located 
any remaining t\'ping er- 
rors, and have a good idea 
of how the program oper- 
ates, you're ready to start 
using it in earnest. 

A COMPUTERIZED FILEBOX 

To make Home Injorma- 
tion Manager easy to 
iearn. we've designed it to 
work just like a recipe box 
filled with index cards. You 
can have as many "file- 
boxes" as will fit on your 
disks. 

Since you II usually put 
different kinds of informa- 
tion on each line of every 
index card, you should as- 



sign a name to each line to 
remind you of what goes 
where. For example, for a 
catalog of your books (or 
books you've borrowed or 
lent), you might label the 
first line author; the sec- 
ond, TITLE: the third, pub- 
lisher: the fourth, date; 
the fifth, SUBJECT for gener- 
al subject area; and the 
sixth, LOCATiON for where 
it's shelved or who bor- 
rowed it. 

Once you've typed in in- 
formation about your 
books (choice two on the 
menu), you can print out a 
catalog of your library 
(choice four): add new 
books as you acquire them 
(choice two) and remove 
ones you've disposed of 
(choice three): change any 
entry (e.g., change the LO- 
CATiON of a book from den 
to BEDROOM — choice three 
again): or display or print 
out the information about 
a particular book or all the 
books on a given subject 
(also choice three). 

Choice six lets you store 
the filebox you'rt working 
on (all cards and the card 
format) on disk; bring a 
new one into memory from 
disk: and remove (erase) a 
filebox. Choice five displays 
the names of all the file- 
boxes (and other files) 
you've saved on the disk, 

EAST TO USE 

For the most part, it will 
be obvious how to use the 
program, and you'll quickly 
learn how to use even the 
more obscure features 
(with a little experimenta- 
tion). Here are some gener- 
al principles: 

1. When to Press RE- 
TURN. When you see a 



menu and the selection -> 
prompt, or when you're 
asked for a line number, 
just press the number key 
for the option or line you 
want. You'll go directly 
there without having to 
press RETURN. But when- 
ever you're asked to type in 
something longer than one 
character — a card number, 
say, or a line name — the 
program waits for you to 
press RETURN to Indicate 
you're done. 

2. Moving Back Up 
Through the Menus. If you 
ever get tost in the pro- 
gram, decide you don't 
want the choice you just 
made after all, or have fin- 
ished with an option, you 
can always press the ESC 
key. This will take you to 
the previous menu at any 
time (except when you're 
reading from, or writing 
onto, a disk), even when 
you're in the middle of typ- 
ing in a line. 

3. Built-in Editor. When 
you see a less-than sign 
(<) and a blinking cursor, 
you are using the built-in 
editor subprogram. You 
can then type in and edit a 
line of text. It will let you 
make changes in the line 
until you press RETURN. 

You are always in "Insert 
mode": that is, any charac- 
ter you type will be insert- 
ed in the line at the cur- 
sor's position. The left and 
right cursor keys move the 
cursor within the line; the 
DELETE key deletes the 
character under the cur- 
sor. Apple II plus comput- 
ers don't have a DELETE 
key. You have to use CTRL- 
D instead (hold down the 
CONTROL key and 
press D). 



70 FAMILY COMPUTING 



A FEW HINTS 

Remembering these few 
key points will make using 
the program easier: 

1 . When designing a 
card format, make sure 
you allow space for all the 
lines you might need (up 
to a maximum of nine). 
Once you start adding 
cards to the fllebox, you 
can"t add or delete lines 
without losing all the cards 
in memory. lYou can 
change the names of exist- 
ing lines, though.) 

2. Since there's no sort 
function to rearrange your 
cards in alphabetic or nu- 
meric order, you should 
type in your information in 
the order you want it to 
appear. You cart add a card 
in the middle, but you 
have to wait for the com- 
puter to shift all the other 
cards back. 

3. When you choose dss- 
play/change/remove or 
PRINT and then work W!TH 

(or PRINT) SELECTED CARDS. 

you're given two choices. 

MATCH FROM BEGINNiNG OF 

LINE checks to see if a line 
begins with the characters 



you've specified, search 
WHOLE LINE looks for thosc 
characters everywhere 
within a line, but takes 
much longer. For example, 
if you tell the program to 

look for SMITH, SE.iVRCH 

WHOLE LINE would find both 
SMITH, JOE and joe smith; 

MATCH from beginning OF 

LIKE would find only smith. 

JOE. 

Bear In mind that the 
program considers upper- 
case and lowercase letters 
to be different, so a search 
for smith would not find 
"Smith" or "smith." 

4. When you print a 
card or cards, they'll be 
printed with a predefined 
format (left margin and 
number of lines skipped 
between cards). You can 
change this predefined for- 
mat by choosing change 
printer options from the 
PRINT CARD(S| menu. 

5. The number of cards 
you can add to a filebox Is 
determined by the number 
of lines in your card for- 
mat. When you add cardis). 
you'll see how many cards 
you've used and how many 



more will fit in your cur- 
rent fllebox. 

6> Remember to back up 
your disks frequently — cer- 
tainly after every session in 
which you enter a lot of in- 
formation. If you have a 
printer, it's a good idea to 
make a printout of every- 
thing In your flleboxes oc- 
casionally. To be absolutely 
safe, you can print out 
each new index card as 
you add it, then throw out 
your accumulated hard 
copies when you do a mas- 
ter printout of the entire 
file (or when you back up 
the disk). 

MOVING ON 

Home Information Man- 
ager is powerful, but if you 
use it often you may find 
yourself bumping up 
against some of its limita- 
tions: 

• You can't do complex 
multiple searches (e.g., 
find all the recipes that call 
for both ham and broccoli, 
but not cheese; or all the 
people who sent you 
Christmas cards for two of 
the last three years). 



• You can only fit so 
much onto one index card. 

• Once you've set up a 
card format, you can't add 
more lines or delete exist- 
ing ones without losing all 
the information you've 
typed in. 

• Filebox size is limited 
by how much info will fit 
into memory at once, rath- 
er than by the storage ca- 
pacity of your disk. 

• The program won't 
sort your cards alphabeti- 
cally or numerically. 

• The input and print- 
ing options are fairly ele- 
mentary. 

If, after using Home In- 
formation Manager, you 
discover you need some of 
these more advanced fea- 
tures, watch future issues 
of family COMPUTING for a 
look at commercial data- 
base management pro- 
grams. To better under- 
stand how they work, keep 
in mind that what we call 
"fileboxes," commercial 
programs term "files." 
They also refer to index 
cards as "records," and 
"lines" as "fields." > 



Give your computer a robot 
to play w^ith. 




Now you and your computer can 
learn and have fun at the same time. Tfie 
tisctiertecfinik Robotic Computing Kit lets you 
explore ttie exciting (ield of robotics and computer 
"control wilt) 10 difierenl and cfiallenging projects. Projects tfiat 
will expand not only your knowledge but your imagination as well. 

The Sischertechnik Robotic Computing Kit* is designed so you start 
off by building a simple computer-conlfolled traffic signal project and 
work up to a complex solar tracking system. Simple, clearly defined 
BASIC programs on a diskette make it easy. The kit also comes with 
easy-to-undersland building instructions and wiring plans for each 
project. So you'll get it right from start to finish. When you complete 



the 10 basic projects, you'll have enough knowledge to develop further 
moQeis and programs on your own. With the lischertechnik Robotic 
Computing Kit, the possibilities are endless. 
For more information on the fischertechnik Robotic Computing Kit, 
contact your neares! fischertechnik dealer or call 201-227-9283. 
jischer America, Inc., 175 Route 46 West, Fairfield, MJ 07006. 
•Available naw for Apple* II, 11 + , lie. and compatibles; Commodore® VIC 20 
and C64. IBM® and more to come. 



otrr^;/lp^_TTT?>^!i3 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 20 



FEATURE PROGRAM 



Apple II series w/48K RAM, disk drive [printer 
optional), & DOS 3.Z*/Home information Manager 

'See itu3<tlHt-filtonJOT PfoDOS below. 

10 DIM &NS(2),FS<9J,M$<7),M1C8),SM$C18),Y$(2700),YNS(1 

),ZSC9) 

2S) DS = CHR$<4):E$ = CHR$C27):G$ = CHR$(7) 

30 RES = CHR$<13):SPS = CHR$(32):FT = 0:RT = 

40 YNSC0) = "N":YNS(1) = "Y":LH = 1 : SP = 1:PF = B 

50 HF = 1:F0R I = 1 TO 7: READ H$(IJ:NEXT I 

60 HI(0) = 1:F0R I = 1 TO 7:READ T:«I(I+1) = HI(1)+T 

70 FOR J = KKI) TO KI (1+1 )-1 : REAO SH$<J):N£XT J, I 

80 FOR 1 = TO 2:READ DHSCDrNEXT I 

90 BL$ = SPS:L$ = SPS:FOR I = 1 TO 3S:BL$ = BL$+SP$ 

100 LS = L$+CHR$C61):MEXT I:TEXT:HOME 

110 GOSUB 2400:VTAB 1:HTAB 1:PRINT LS:PRINT RE$;L$ 

120 POKE 34,3:P0KE 35,22 

130 HOME 

140 fi$ = "HOME INFORMATION MANAGER" :60SUB 2720 

150 PRINT: FOR I = 1 TO 6 

160 PRINT TABC5);"<";1;"> ";M$(I);RE$:NEXT I 

170 PRINT:PRiNT TAB(9),-"SELECTI0N — >"; 

180 A$ = "6":G0SUB 2300:HS = VALfKS) 

190 IF K$ = E$ THEN MS = 7 

200 IF CHS <> 3 AND MS <> 4) OR RT > THEN 230 

210 GOSUB 2700:PR1NT "NO CARDS PRESENT," 

220 GOSUB 2100:GOTO 130 

230 ON MS GOTO 240,560,900,1020,1340,1390,1899 

240 FL = 29:G0SUB 3000:IF KS = ES THEN 130 

250 AS = STR$(FT):IF SE > 2 OR RT < 1 THEN 270 

260 GOSUB 2710: GOSUB 2500: ON K$ = ES GOTO 240: RT = 

270 IF FT = AND SE > 1 THEN 440 

280 ON SE GOTO 290,370,460,530 

290 GOSUB 3100: IF FT < 9 THEN 320 

300 PRINT "A CARD HAS ONLY 9 LINES!" 

310 GOSUB 2100:GOTO 240 

320 FT = FT+1:C = FT 

330 KS = "LINE "■i-STRS(C)+":":T$ = "" 

340 GOSUB 6000: IF K$ = ES THEN FT = FT-1:eOT0 540 

350 FS(FT) = IS: IF FT < 9 THEN 290 

360 GOSUB 3100:GOTO 310 

370 GOSUB 3100: IF FT < 1 THEN 450 

380 AS = STRSCFT) 

390 PRIKT "WHICH LINE DO YOU WANT TO DELETE? "; 

400 GOSUB 2300: IF KS = ES THEN 540 

410 C = VAL(K$):IF C = FT THEN 430 

420 FOR I = C TO FT-1:F$(I) = FS(I+1):NEXT 1 

430 FT = fT-1:IF FT > THEN 370 

440 GOSUB 2710 

450 PRINT "NO LINES PRESENT. ":GOSUB 2100:GOTO 540 

460 GOSUB 3100 

470 PRINT "CHANGE THE NAME OF WHICH LINE #? "; 

480 GOSUB 2300: IF KS = ES THEN 240 

490 PRINT KS;C = VAL<K$) 

500 H$ = "LINE "+STRS(C)+":":T$ - FS(C) 



510 GOSUB 6000 
520 FSCC) = IS 
530 GOSUB 3100 



IF KS = ES THEN 460 
GOTO 460 
GOTO 240 

INT(2700/FT) 




540 MAX = 0:IF FT > THEN MAX 

550 GOTO 240 

560 WS = ES:IF FT > THEN 590 

570 GOSUB 2700:PRINT "YOU MUST ";M$C1);" (OPTION 1" 

580 PRINT "ON MAIN MENU) FIRST. ":GOSUB 2100:GOTO 130 

590 IF RT = MAX THEN GOSUB 27e0:GOTO 650 

600 GOSUB 3000: IF KS = ES THEN 130 

610 GOSUB 2710: FL = 38:IF SE = 2 THEN 760 

620 GOSUB 2600 

630 RT = RT+1:IF RT < MAX+1 THEN 660 

640 RT = MAX 

650 PRINT G$;DHS(2):G0SUB 2100:GOTO 130 

660 VTAB 4:HTAB 15:PRINT "CARD ";RT 

670 C = RT:FOR L = 1 TO FT:60SUB 3200 

680 IF KS <> ES THEN YS(T) = TS:GOTO 700 

690 L = FT:RT = RT-1 

700 NEXT L:IF KS = ES THEN 600 

710 PRINT L$:PRINT DMSCB) 

>-5720 VTAB 20:PR1NT "CARDS USED: ";RT 

730 VTA8 21:PR1NT "CARDS LEFT; ";MAX-RT; SPS; 



740 GOSUB 2200: ON KS = SPS GOTO 620: GOTO 130 

750 G0SU8 2710: IF RT = MAX THEN 650 

760 HS = "INSERT BEFORE WHICH CARD fl?":TS = "" 

770 FL = 39:G0SU6 6000: IF KS = ES THEN 600 

780 GOSUB 2710 

790 C = VALa$):IF C > AND C < RT+1 THEN 810 

800 PRINT 6S;DMS(1):G0SUB 2100:GOTO 590 

810 PRINT TABC13};"NEW CARD ";C 

820 FOR L = 1 TO FT; GOSUB 3200 

830 IF KS = ES THEN L = FT:GOTO 850 

840 ZSCL) = T$ 

850 NEXT L:IF KS = E$ THEN 600 

S60 FOR J = RT*FT TO (C-1)*FT+1 STEP -1 

870 YS(J+FT) = YS<J):NEXT J:RT = RT+1 

880 FOR J = 1 TO FT;YS((C-1)*FT+J) = ZS(J>:NEXT J 

890 GOTO 750 

900 F = -1 

910 GOSUB 3000; IF KS = ES THEN 130 

920 GOSUB 2710:1F SE = 2 THEN 1010 

930 HS = "START WITH WHICH CARD?":TS = "":FL = 32 

940 GOSUB 6000:1F KS = ES THEN 910 

950 V = VAL(TS):IF V > AND V < RT+1 THEN 970 

960 PRINT LS:PR1NT GS;DMS(1 ) :GOSUB 2100:GOTO 910 

970 GOSUB 3900: J = V 

980 W$ = "": GOSUB 4000: IF WS = ES THEN 910 

990 J = J+1:IF J < RT+1 THEN 980 

1000 HOME:PRINT 6S;DHS(2) :GOSUB 2100:GOTO 910 

1010 GOSUB 5000:GOTO 910 

1020 RAS = " (1-"+STRS(RT)+">?" 

1030 FL = 6:G0SUB 3O00:IF KS = ES THEN 130 

1040 GOSUa 2710:ON SE GOTO 1050,1080,1130,1140,1150 

1050 PRINT "PRINT WHICH CARD #";RAS 

1060 GOSUB 3700: IF RF THEN 1030 

1070 R1 = T:R2 = T:GOSUB 3800:GOTO 1020 

1080 PRINT "START MITH WHICH CARD #";RA$ 

1090 GOSUB 37O0:R1 = T:IF Rf THEN 1030 

1100 PRINT "STOP WITH MHICH CARD ff";RAS 

1110 GOSUB 3700:R2 = T:IF (RF) OR R2 < R1 THEN 1030 

1120 GOSUB 3800:GOTO 1020 

1130 R1 = 1:R2 = RT:GOSUB 380O:GOTO 1020 

1140 GOSUB 5000:GOTO 1020 

1150 FL = 37:H$ = "LEFT MARGIN (0-40):" 

1160 TS = STRS(LM) 

1170 GOSUB 6000;IF KS = ES THEN 1020 

1180 LM = VAL(TS):IF LM > -1 AND LM < 41 THEM 1210 

1190 LM = 1:VTAB 4:PRINT BLS 

1200 VTAB 4:HTAB 1:G0TO 1160 

1210 H$ = "BLANK LINES BETWEEN CARDS (0-66):" 

1220 T$ = STRSCSP) 

1230 GOSUB 6000: If KS = E$ THEN 1020 

1240 SP = VALCTS):If SP > -1 AND SP < 67 THEN 1270 

1250 SP = 0:VTAB 5:PRINT BLS 

1260 VTAB 5:HTAB 1:G0T0 1220 

1270 HS = "PAUSE AFTER EACH CARD (Y/N):":T$ = YNS(PF) 

1280 GOSUB 6000: IF KS = ES THEN 1020 

1290 PF = (LEFTSCTS,1) = "Y") 

1300 HS = "PRINT LINE NAMES (Y/N):":TS = YN$(HF) 

1310 GOSUB 6000: IF KS = ES THEN 1020 

1320 HF = (LEFTS(TS,1) = "Y") 

1330 PRINT LS:GOSUB 2100:GOTO 1020 

1340 GOSUB 2700:ONERR GOTO 1370 

1350 POKE 35,24:H0ME 

1360 PRINT:PRINT DS;"CATALOG,Dr" 

1370 PRINT L$:GOSUB 240O:GOSUB 2100 

1380 POKE 35,22:P0KE 216,0:GOTO 130 

1390 FL = 35 

1400 GOSUB 3000: IF KS = ES THEN 130 

1410 GOSUB 2710 

1420 IF SE <> 2 OR RT < 1 THEN 1440 

1430 GOSUB 25O0:HOME:IF K$ = ES THEN 1400 

1440 TS = "":IF SE = 1 THEN HS = "STORE UNDER WHAT NAM 

E?" 

1450 IF SE = 2 THEN HS = "GET WHICH FILEBOX?" 

1460 IF SE = 3 THEN HS = "REMOVE WHICH FILEBOX?" 

1470 GOSUB 6000: IF TS = "" OR KS = ES THEN 1400 

1480 IF VALCTS) <> OR ASC(T$) = 48 THEN 1400 

1490 TS = TS+". HIM": POKE 35,24:H0ME:0NERR GOTO 1510 



EO- 



72 FAMILY COMPUTING 



1500 ON SE GOTO 1 640, 179S>, 1620 
1510 ER = PEEK<222} 
15Z0 HOME 

1530 PRINT D$;"CLOSE ";TS:PR1NT GS; 

15A0 IF ER = 5 THEN PRINT "FILE INCOMPLETE: ";1NT(J/FT 
);" OF ",-RT;" CARDS READ.":G0TO 1860 
1550 IF ER = 4 THEN PRINT "DISK IS WRITE PROTECTED." 
1560 IF ER = 6 THEN PRINT "THAT FILEBOX IS NOT ON THIS 
DISK." 
1S70 IF ER = S OR ER = 9 OR ER = 11 THEN PRINT "DISK E 
RROR." 

1580 IF ER = 9 THEN PRINT "SORRY, THIS DISK IS FULL. 
TRY ANOTHER." 
1590 IF ER = 13 THEN PRINT "THAT IS NOT A FILEBOX FILE 

II 

1600 PRINT L$:GOSUB 240fl:GOSUB 2100 

1610 POKE 35,22:POKE 216,0:6OTO 1400 

1620 PRINT DS;"DELET£ ",-T$ 

1630 GOSUB 240®:GOTO 1610 

1640 ONERR GOTO 1710 

1654) PRINT DS;"LOCK ";T$ 

1660 PRINT DS;"UNLOCK ";T$ 

1670 PRINT GS;"THAT FILEBOX IS ALREADY ON THIS DISK." 

1680 PRINT "PRESS <SPACE BAR> TO REPLACE IT." 

1690 GOSUB 2400:GOSUB 2200:IF K$ = E$ THEN 1610 

1700 POKE 35,24:H0ME:PRINT:PRINT D$;"DELETE ";T$ 

1710 PRINT D$;"OPEN ";T$ 

1720 PRINT 0$;"WRITE ";T$ 

1730 PRINT "FILES0X":PR1NT FT:PRINT RT 

1740 PRINT LM:PRINT SP:PRINT PFrPRINT HF 

1750 FOR J = 1 TO FT:PRINT CHR$<34); F$(J);CHR$C34) 

1760 NEXT J:IF RT = THEN 1780 

1770 FOR J = 1 TO RT*FT:PR1NT CHR$(34>;Y$<J);CHRS(34) : 

NEXT J 

1780 PRINT D$;"CLOSE ";T$:60SUB 2400:GOTO 1610 

1790 PRINT DS;"L)NLOCK ":T$ 

1800 PRINT D$;"OPEN ";T$ 

1810 PRINT D$;"READ ";T$ 

1820 INPUT C$:IF CS <> "FILEBOX" THEN ER = 13:G0T0 153 



1830 INPUT FT:INPUT RT:INPUT LM:INPUT SP:INPUT PF:INPU 

T HF 

1 TO FT:INPUT F$(J):NEXT J:IF RT = THEN 



1840 FOR 

1860 
1850 FOR 
1860 MAX 



= 1 TO RT*FT:INPUT Y$(J):NEXT J 
0:IF FT > THEN MAX = INTC2700/FT) 
1870 PRINT CS;"CLOSE ";T$ 

1880 PRINT "FILEBOX IS NOW IN MEMORY .":GOTO 1600 
1890 GOSUB 3000: IF SE = 1 OR K$ = E$ THEN 130 
1900 TEXT: HOME: END 
2000 POKE -16368,0 

2010 K = PEEK(-16384):IF K < 128 THEN 2010 
2020 K$ = CHR$CK-128):P0KE -16368,0: RETURN 
2100 GOSUB 2000:ON KS <> E$ GOTO 2100: RETURN 
2200 GOSUB 2000: IF K$ <> E$ AND K$ <> SP$ THEN 2200 
2210 RETURN 
2300 GET K$ 

2310 IF KS <> E$ AND (KS < "1" OR K$ > AS) THEN 2300 
2320 RETURN 

2400 VTAB 23:HTAB 1:PRINT LS 

2410 VTAB 24:KTAB lljPRINT "PRESS <ESC> TO EXIT."; 
2420 RETURN 

2500 PRINT "WARNING! USE OF THIS OPTION WILL ERASE" 
2510 PRINT "CONTENTS OF ALL CARDS FROM MEMORY." 
2520 PRINT:PRINT DM$(0):GOSUB 2200:RETURN 
2600 POKE 35,18:H0HE:P0KE 35,22:RETURN 
2700 HOMEiRS = MS(MS):GOTO 2720 
2710 HOME:R$ = SM$CMI<MS)+SE-1);G0T0 2720 
2720 VTAB 2:HTAB 1:PRINT BL$:VTAB 2:HTAB 1 
2730 PRINT SPC((40-LEN(RS>)/2);R$:VTAB 4:RETURN 
3000 GOSUB 2700:PRINT:FOR I = MI(MS) TO MICMS+1)-1 
3010 PRINT TABC6);"<";I-MICMS>+1;"> ";SMS(I) 
3020 PRINTiNEXT I:A$ = STR$(MICMS+1 )-«I(MS) ) 
3030 PR1NT:PRINT TABC10);"SELECTION — >"; 
3040 GOSUB 2300:SE = VAL<KEJ : RETURN 
3100 GOSUB 2710: IF FT < 1 THEN RETURN 
3110 FOR I = 1 TO FT I 



AT LAST, THE TRIVIA GAME 
FOR THOSE WHO TAKE 
THEIR TRIVIA SERIOUSLY. 



LaTriviata 

■' . . It's .1 winiicr[" 



Escape boring 
board -game 
setups, multiple- 
choice formats 
: and silly 
: questions with 
La Triviata ."' 
You get two disks 
packed with 
intriguing 
questions in seven 
categories and 
three difficulty 
levels, for up 
to four players 
or teams. 
Type in your 
answers and show what you know — even if you're not a 
perfect speller. Additional question disks avaiiabSe. For 
use with Apple® lie, lie, and II + computers. 

"It's a winner!" - Software Update 





LEARNINO BYBTEMS, INC. 

St P.iul, MN 5.5US, iBOOi 328-8322. Ext. ,117 

Apple- is A registered irjdemark ot Apple Computer. Inc. 
La Triviiti'^ is a registered trademark ol Hughes Enterprises. Inc. 
CIRCLE READER SERVICE 34 



REALACnON? 



Sneak preview the greatest! SUMMER GAMES"! 
SUMMER GAMES 11™ WINTER GAMES™ THE WORLD'S 
GREATEST FOOTBALL GAME™ THE WORLD'S 
GREATEST BASEBALL GAME™ Award winners. Best 
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$3.50 buys you a floppy disk that lets you try out all five 
Best of all, you get a rebate worth $3.50 when you purchase 
any game shown on the disk. 

This may be the only Epyx sports challenge that you 
absolutely, positively can't lose. 



VEC I ■ WANT TO PREVIEW THESE GREAT SPORTS GAMES FROM 
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L'nilcid State* and CajiKla- Hebatctspirt-i February 15, 1986 Void where prohibiled. Srt rcsottmtbic hn Ute. 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 17 



NOVEMBER 1985 73 



FiATURE PROGRAM 



31Ze PRINT "LINE ";!;": ";F$(I):NEXT I 

3130 PRINT L$:IF MS = 3 OR HS = 4 THEN RETURN 

3140 If SE = 4 THEN 60SUB 2100 

3150 RETURN 

3200 T = (C-1>*FT+L:H$ = F$CL)+":":T3 = "" 

3210 IF WS = "C" THEN T$ = Y$(T) 

32E0 GOSUB 60045: RETURN 

3300 W$ = ""jPRINT TAB(LM+1S);"CARD ";J 

3310 FOR Z = 1 TO FT:T$ = "":lf HF THEN T$ = F$CZ)+": 

H 

3320 PRINT TAB(LM>;T$;Y$C(J-1)*FT+Z) 

3330 W$ = CHRSCPEEKC-16384)):IF W$ = E$ THEN Z = FT:J 

= R2 

3340 NEXT Z:IF WS = E$ THEN RETURN 

3350 IF SP = THEN 3370 

3360 FOR Z = 1 TO SP:PRINT:NEXT Z 

3370 G0SU8 2600:IF PF = THEN RETURN 

3380 PRINT DS;"PR# 0":PfiINT DH$C0):GOSUB 2200 

33V0 PRINT;PftINT D$;"PR# 1":IF K$ = SP$ THEN RETURN 

3400 J = R2; RETURN 

3500 PRINT TAB(15);"CARD ";J:PRINT L$ 

3510 FOR Z = 1 TO FT:PR1NT FSCZ);":";Y$( (J-l )*FT+Z) 

3520 NEXT Z:PRINT L$:RETURN 

3600 PRINT "PRESS <SPACE BAR> WHEN PRINTER IS READY." 

3610 GOSUB 2Z00rRETURN 

3700 RF = 1:H$ = "?":TS = "":GOSUB 6000:PRINT L$ 

3710 IF K$ = ES OR T$ = "" THEN RETURN 

3720 T = VAL(TS):IF T > AND T <= RT THEN RF = 0:RETU 

RN 

3730 PRINT G$;DM$(1):PRINT L$ 

3740 GOSUB 21 00: RETURN 

3800 GOSUB 3600: IF K£ = £$ THEN RETURN 

3810 PRINT:PRINT D$;"PR# 1" 

3820 FOR J = R1 TO R2:G0SUB 3300 

3830 NEXT J:PRINT D$,-"PR# 0":RETURN 

3900 VTAB 19:HTAB 1 

3910 PRINT "PSESS <C> TO CHANGE THIS CARD," 

3920 PRINT "PRESS <P> TO PRINT IT," 

3930 PRINT "PRESS <R> TO REMOVE IT, OR" 

3940 PRINT "PRESS <SPACE BAR> TO MOVE TO NEXT CARD.";: 

RETURN 

4000 GOSUB 2600:GOSU8 3500 

4010 GOSUB 20«0:IF K$ = ES THEN W$ = E$:J = ST:RETURN 

4020 IF K$ = SPS THEN RETURN 

4030 ON KS = "C" GOTO 4110: IF K$ = "R" THEN 4170 

4040 IF K$ <> "P" THEN 4010 

4050 HOME 

4060 IF F THEN 60SUB 3600: IF K$ = E$ THEN 4100 

4070 F = 0;PRINT "NOW PRINTING CARD ";J 

4080 PRINT: PRINT DS;"PR# 1" 

4090 GOSUB 3300: PRINT D$;"Pfi# 0" 

4100 J = J-1;G0SUB 3900:RETURN 

4110 HOME:GOSUB 2710 

4120 FL = 39:PRINT TAB(15);"CARD ";J 

4130 C = J:W$ = "C":fOR L = 1 TO FT:G0SIIB 3200 

4140 IF KS = ES THEN L = FT:G0T0 4160 

4150 YSCT) = T$ 

4160 NEXT L:J = J-1:G0SUB 3900:R£TURN 

4170 H0ME:60SUB 3S00 

4180 PRINT "PRESS <SPACE BAR> TO REMOVE THIS CARD." 

4190 GOSUB 2200:GOSUB 3900: IF K$ = E$ THEN J = J-1:RET 

URN 

4200 IF J = RT THEN 4230 

4210 FOR Z = CJ-1)*FT+1 TO (RT-1)*FT 

4220 Y$<Z) = Y$(:Z+FT):NEXT Z 

4230 RT = RT-1:J = J-1:RETURN 

5000 GOSUB 3110:A$ = STRSCFT) 

5010 WS = "":PRINT "SELECT CARDS BY WHICH LINE #?"; 

5020 GOSUB 2300: IF KS = E$ THEN RETURN 

5030 V = VALCKS): GOSUB 2600 

5040 PRINT "WHAT TEXT ARE YOU SEARCHING FOR?" 

5050 FL = 38:HS = "?":TS = "":GOSUB 6000 

5060 IF K$ = E$ OR TS = "" THEN RETURN 

5070 HOKE:PRiNT 

5080 PRINT TAB<5);"<1> MATCH FROM BEGINNING OF LINE" 

5090 PRINT RES;TABC5);"<2> SEARCH WHOLE LINE";PRINT 



Wt^r 



5100 AS = "2":PRINT TAB(9);"SELECTI0N — >"; 

5110 GOSUB 2300: IF K$ = £$ THEN RETURN 

5120 SF = 0:SR$ = T$:LS = LENCSRS) 

5130 J = 1:IF KS = "2" THEN 5220 

5140 HOME 

5150 PRINT TABC10);"CHECKING CARD ";J 

5160 IF SRS <> LEFT$CY$<(J-1)*FT+V),LS) THEN 5180 

5170 SF - 1:W$ = "":GOSUB 3900:GOSUB 4000:HOKE 

5180 POKE -16368,0:XS = CHfiSCPEEKC-16384) ) 

5190 IF W$ = E$ OR X$ = ES THEN RETURN 

5200 J = J+1:IF J <= RT THEN 5140 

5210 GOTO 5330 

5220 ZS = YSCCJ-1)*FT+V):LZ = LENCZS) 

5230 HOME:PfiINT TAB{10);"CKECKING CARD ";J 

5240 IF Z$ = "" OR LZ < LS THEN 5320 

5250 FOR W = 1 TO LZ-LS+1 

5260 IF SRS <> MIDSCZ$,W,LS) THEN 5280 

5270 W = 256:SF = 1 :W$ = "":GOSUB 3900:GOSUB 4000:HOME 

5280 POKE -16368,0:XS = CHR$CPEEKC-16384)) 

5290 IF WS = ES OR XS = E$ THEN W = 300 

5300 NEXT W 

5310 IF WS = ES OR (XS = E$ AND K$ <> E$) THEN RETURN 

5320 J = J+1:IF J < RT+1 THEN 5220 

5330 HOME: IF SF < 1 THEN 5350 

5340 PRINT "NO MORE CARDS MATCH!": GOSUB 2100:RETURN 

5350 PRINT "NO CARDS MATCH! ": GOSUB 2100:RETURN 

6000 PRINT H$;:XL = PEeK(36):YL = PEEK<37)+1 

6010 PC = 2:T$ = SPS+T$ 

6020 VTAB YL:HTAB XL+1:PRINT T$;"<";$P$ 

6030 VTAB YL:HTAB XL+PC 

6040 GET K$:K = ASC(KS):IF K =- 127 THEN K = 4 

6050 IF K > 31 THEN 6120 

6060 ER = (K = 13)+(K = 27):IF ER THEN 6150 

6070 CU = (K = 21)-<K = 8):IF K = 4 THEN 6110 

6080 IF CU = THEN 6030 

6090 PC = PC+CU:PC = PC+(PC < 2)-(PC > LEN(T$)+1) 

6100 GOTO 6030 

6110 TS = LEFT$(T$,PC-1J+HID$aS,PC + 1,L£N(T$)):60T0 60 

20 

6120 IF LENCTS) > FL-XL-1 THEN 6040 

6150 TS = LEFT$(T$,PC-1)+K$+HID$(T$,PC, LENCTS)) 

6140 PC = PC+1:G0T0 6020 

6150 TS = MID$(T$,2,FL) 

6160 VTAB YL:HTAB XL+2:PRiNT T$;SP$:VTAB YL+1 

6170 RETURN 

7000 DATA DESIGN CARD FORMAT, ADD CARDCS) 

7010 DATA DISPLAY/CHANGE/REMOVE CARDCS), PRINT CARDCS) 

7020 DATA LIST ALL FILES ON DISK 

7030 DATA GET NEW/STORE/REMOVE FILEBOX,QUIT 

7040 DATA 4, ADD NEW LINES,DELETE LINES 

7050 DATA CHANGE NAMES OF LINES, DISPLAY CARD FORMAT 

7060 DATA 2,ADD AT END, INSERT BEFORE END 

7070 DATA 2, LOOK AT CARDS CONSECUTIVELY 

7080 DATA WORK WITH SELECTED CARDCS) 

7090 DATA 5, PRINT ONE CARD, PRINT A RANGE OF CARDS 

7100 DATA PRINT ALL CAROS,PRINT SELECTED CARDCS) 

7110 DATA CHANGE PRINTER OPTIONS,!, DISK 

7120 DATA 3, STORE THIS FILEBOX ON DISK 

7130 DATA GET A FILEBOX FROM DISK 

7140 DATA REMOVE A FILE FROM DISK 

7150 DATA 2, RETURN TO MAIN MENU, QUIT 

8000 DATA "PRESS <SPACE BAR> TO CONTINUE." 

8010 DATA NO SUCH CARD!, NO MORE CARDS! 

MODIFICATION FOR PRODOS 

Apple 11 series w/64K RAM, disk drive (printer 
optional), & ProDOS/Heme Information Manager 

Use the DOS 3.3 version, except change line 1360 to read 
as fotlows: 

1360 PRINT:PRINT D$;"CAT,D1" 



:S- 



74 FAM1I,Y COMPUTING 




Z3Z3 



m 



asn 



programTA 



A Service 
n Cooperation 



1^31 



SmiBUTOR OF AMEniCA'S LEADING SOFTWA 



■.r.imMmM&m' 








A COMPUTE PROGRAM FOR 
SCORiHC HIGH ON THE 
SCHOLASTIC APmUMTEJT 



iitfocom 




^ DengnUfflw^ 



OesignWare 



Harcourt Brace Jovangvich 




^Scholastic nA-sx^. 



52£?/ 



Scholnstk 



FAMILY COMPUTING and First Software Corp. are proud to introduce 

these FAMILY COMPUTING ShowcQse Programs. They represent 

top quality software programs that are available at family computing 

Showcase Dealers, You will find the names of these dealers 
listed at the end of this special section. These programs were evaluated 

and are distributed through First Software Corp., 
---,. a leading distributor of computer products. 



iVi=M-i,L-i..fiVi^»--i;[-i,if-V-l:p--i;[.lv;^.V1:0--i;[.V,Y.f.Vij,TTT-lVi-».^ --1J-H!r-i'.V->.t 

Earth will be destroyed in 12 minutes 
to make way for a hyperspace bypass. 

Should you hitchhila into the next galaxy? 

Or stay and drink beer? 

Slip the disk in youi' computer and suddenly you ai'e A- 

Aithm- Dent, the dubious hero of THE HITCHHIKER'S 

GUIDE TO THE GALAXY, a side-splitting mastenvork 

of interactive fiction by no\'elist Douglas Adams and 

Inibcom's Steve Meretzk}', And eveiy decision you 

niake mil shape the stoiy's outcome. Suppose foi- 

instance you decide to linger in the pub. You simply 

type, in plain English: 

>DRINK THE BEER 

And the story responds: 

YOU GET DRUNK AND HAUE A TER- 
RIFIC TIME FOR TWELVE NINUTEB* 
ARE THE LIFE AND SOUL OF 
THE PUB» THEY ALL 
CLAP YOU ON 
THE BACK 






■$ H 







AND 
ELL YOU 
InHAT a GREAT 
CHAP YOU ARE AND 
THEN THE EARTH GETS 
UNEXPECTEDLY DEMOLISHED. YDU 
WAKE UP WITH A HANGOMER WHICH LASTS 
FOR ALL ETERNITY. YOU HA'.'E DIED, 

Suppose, on the other hand, you dedde to: 

>E)<IT THE '.I ILL AGE PUB THEN GO NORTH 

In that case you'll be off on the most mind-boggling^ 
liilai-ious adventiu-e any eai-tliling ever had. 

You communicate -and the stoiy responds-in full 
sentences. So at eveiy tmii, you have literally thousands 
of alternatives. If you decide it might be wise, for 
instance, to wrap a towel ai-ound yom- head, just say so: 



>WRAP THE TOWEL ARQUND^i^^^b^ftA'DC^JRy^v^ 

And the story responds; ^^*y/ 

THE RA'v'ENOUS BUGB LATTER BEAST OF 
TRAAL IS COMPLETELY BEWILDERED. 
IT IS SO DIM IT THINKS IF YOU CAN''T 
SEE IT. IT CAN 'T SEE YOU. 

Simply stajdng alive from one zany situa- 
tion to the next will requii'e eveiy proton of 
puzzle soKing prowess yom* mere mortal 
mind can muster. So put down 
j«i- r«, ,^,._ that beer and Mtchhike 
' ' ' dow^^ to youi" local 
softwai'e store today. 
Before they put that 
"'"u^ ^^^^m^. bypass in. 





("iiinvr-njRifilctii withlV-nl Si-iL^^ilivc 

I IiaX'T TAN IC nmtuii, a i«.dy;.H- nf 
MulUjiuqKiSi* Fluff liiid onttT>fi(rElie 
rien^truclion nfynur home ami j>!anH. 




V 



Other interactive ?oietice lielion stories from Infocom. 



inFocom 

For more information call 1-800-262-6868. Or ttrilc to us 
at 125 CambridgePark Drive, Cambridge, .MA 02140. 



© 1985 InTocom, Inc. THE HITCKHIKER'SGUIDETOTHEGALAXV isatrTdemarfcofftiuKlas Adams, PI..ANETKALL.STARCROS.S.SUSPENDEDand A mST FOREVER VOYAGlNGarelndemarks«fINFCK^^ 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 24 



r-l'.'t.f.T.Hg-H'l-V.7-F.VHJl-H![-V.7-f.Mg-H;i-lV;-f.Vig^TTTrr77^5^m.Trr-r^-T«.i;[ 




A COMPLETE PftOCRAM FOR 
SCORING HIGH CM THE 
SCHOLASTIC APTITUDE TEST 

■■" TA'JCftTTTIS'ATHllUJ. =00 J.VE FvOGR'-M 

CMAtJ.rDUJFSOtS 

tCttS W StCC»«S AM) TUfti VIA* WfiM SJ *JlC»V^T'OiO' 
Dl«>«K1*M"" 




USER'S tAWrtUW. 




COMPUTER PREPARATION fur fhc SAT* includes two 

doublo-sided diskettes, a 470-page textbook, and a 50-page 
User's Manual. 



15 Reasons Why HBJ's 
SAT Program Is the #1 SeUer 

But you only have to remember one — it's the only SAT program 
proven to increase scores 

Proven to increase SAT scores — 



1 average of 94 points in only 
seven hours 



2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

8 



Four complete SAT practice tests 



540 English and math drill items 

1000 electronic vocabulary 
flashcards 

Practice test results scored on 
the SAT 200-800 scale 



Comprehensive textbook 

Diagnosis of individual strengths 
and weaknesses in 15 subject areas 



Personalized study plan 



9 
10 
11 
12 
13 

M Available for the most popuU 
home computers — Apple® II 



Test-taking strategy and advice 

Easy-to-understand User's 
Manual, even for students with- 
out any computer experience 



Automatically timed and scored 



One year warranty on diskettes 



Technical Assistance Hotline 



15 



series, IBM® PC, PCjr, 
Commodore® 64, Atari®, 
TRS-80® Models III and 4. 



Complete package only $79.95 



0) 



OTHER TEST PREPARATION PROGRAMS FROM HBJ 

• COMPUTER PREPARATION for the ACT $89.95 

Available for Apple II series 

• COMPUTER PREPARATION for the ORE® $89.95 

Available for Apple II series, IBM PC, PCjr 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 22 

HARCOURT BRACE JOVANOVICH, PUBLISHERS 



fIT:T^i!l-ri->.VHl--i:[.lVi-f..ViJ-H!l-W;-f.<-HJ-H![-ri-F.VHg-HIMV/.f.VHJ-H![.V.7.f.l 



Buy Remember! 

And get another '^^^ne.m 

DesigriWare' 

program 

absolutely FREE!! 









Every Student Needs 
Remember! 

Remember! is a revolutionary learning 
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or college student ever buys. Here's why: 
You can use Remember! to help you 
study almost any subject. Plus, it actually 
teaches valuable learning and memory 
techniques that can be applied to any 
subject, anytime. 

Get Your Free DesignWare Program. 

Just purchase yourcopy of Remember! 
from your favorite software dealer {Don't 
forget to save the receipt!) Then fill out 
and mail in the coupon below. 



H*iLnj-* Cut 




^t HvKt uord 



There's nothing else like it. 

■ It's so powerful, it may be the one pro- 
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your first computer. 

■ It's so easy you'll be learning with it 
in minutes, 

■ It's the first program that uses proven 
memory techniques to help students 
learn and retain information. 

■ Lets you enter pictorial, auditory or 
written hints to help you remember. 

■ Includes special character sets for 
foreign languages, chemistry and 
biology so it can be used for a broad 
range of subjects. 

Available for Apple® llc,lle,ll-t-, 
IBM*' PC, PCjr and Commodore 64 " 
computers. 



What the critics are saying 
about Remember! 

For starters. Remember! has already 
won awards- within the first six months 
oUts introduction. 

Certtfled by NEA 

National Education Association 

Critics' Ctiolce Award 

Outstanding innovative Application 

19B5, Family Computing 

What everyone's saying about 
Remember! 

"t watched my lenih grader sit dawn with your 
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— Sue f //en SctiMzer 
Parent. Fort Worih, Texas 

"Remsmber! is uncommonly user-friendly. The 
demonstration program is thorough and informative 
and constitutes a com plete short cou rse in using 
the toolkit: -TonyMoirrs 

Famrly Computing Magaiine 



Create your own hints to hetp you 
assoaate things you neeol (0 learn. 



l.«s«it Cm»ric« 



Hntttr 10 Ottt^i 



K"i to Wn*J*»»- 



fUlllffU ChDici 



■ hrv> tg pB),»l la tit. tictiH 
w b«:lt. ICIRL X] !o *kit. 



nemembert includes senera/ sturdy 
options; you choose the ones that 
fit your needs. 



Free DesigrlWare Program! 



D I purchased Remember! irom 



Attached is my receipt and my completed 
owner regisl ration card from inside the 
package 
D I could not find Remember! at my soft- 
ware retailer so I am enclosing S79 95 for 
my copy of Remember] 

D Check enclosed (•{yrasidenisac(cre'/j% 
D Please charge my safes (ax.) 

n MasterCard* O Visa® 
Acct. # 



Please rush my free DesignWare program to: 
Namp . 



.Stale, 



City_ 
2p^ 



. Pfione I . 



Exp. Date_ 



Please send my free DesignWare copy of the 
following program fc/ieck one orily) for: 
□ Apple II D IBt^ □ C-64 

□ The Body Transparent"' (ages 10 10 16) 

D European N aliens & Locations'" (9 10 adult) 
D The G rammar Examiner'" (ages lOto aduii) 

□ fvlisston Algebra'" (ages 1310 aduii) 

LJ Other 

AtiJe rn a OestgtWVa'e crogram D' your crtace ' 



Mail Offer to: 
Remember! Promotion 
DesignWare. Inc. , Depl. FC1 
185 Berry Street, 
San Francisco. CA 94107 

Limit -one free product per coupon. 

This coupon (riusi acGOntparty request lat ttee product 

DHer void where pion&l^, faxed or lestricted by latv 

Pfogfammusl&eajrcriasedholatertrati[>CBmt!e'3l, T985 

COLjtKtnandproo/ci'Du'chaserrijStbQposOTarkednolalet 

th3njahua(y31, 1996 Allow4-6«eks!Qrdeliverv 

Oflef no! ^-alid lor retailers oi dislritulofs Ortei not vai'd mcon. 

jurictton Miih any other promolW' 

'Fi^e prog ram mav be arty Des-Qi^ate prograrti olher 

than Ramemberf 



DOIT 
TODAYI 

Offer 
Expires 
Dec. 31 , 

1985 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 12 



!r.v;M.^H^i-i!r-y7r-rii:-T^i^i:r-v;r-f.vio--i;L-v/^-r-v-i^-i:t-^.i-f.-v-i-p--i.i-i>i-f-v-i^i.L 

Prizes...Plots... 
Plus Word Processing 

See them all "grow" on STORY TREE, the 
winning creative writing program for grades 4-12 • 



With story TVee Soft- 
ware from Scholastic, 
you automatically 
gain a prized skill— the 
ability to write more 
creatively. You also get 
a chance to enter the 
Scholastic Story Tree 
Writing Contest-and a 
chance to win prizes. 




Co-sponsofed by Apple Compuier Apple* and the 
Apple Computci iogo are mgj^ietf trade mai\s olApf^e 
'^ Computer, Inc Used tsy permission 




Mi^Scholastic 

The Most Trusted Name in Learning 



fUN SKILLS SERIES: 
Writing 

Ages 9 to Adult 



Discover a dramatically more effective way to iinprovc 
your creative-writing skills. This proven-successful 
software program is Story Tree, from Scholastic. 

With Story Tree, you make choices about how a 
story unfolds or branches. Create a story page by 
page. Link stories together. Or write stories that 
branch by chance. The possibilities are endless! 

Only Story Tree combines the motivational power 
of a computer, the flexibility of a word processor 



and the high interest of thrilling, interactive fiction. 
.Just minutes after you sit down at the computer, 
you will be able to unleash the wondrous powers of 
your imagination. Think and act like writers. Gener- 
ate ideas. . .write a first draft... edit... revise... and even 
print a story and share it with others. Create mys- 
tery and adventure stories, interactive news articles, 
structured book reports, da^a^bas^^^^and much 
more! 



Win Free Software and Apples! 



Thousands of students already use Story Tree to wTite more 
creatively. Now all these students-and your students, too-can 
enter their stories In Scholastic's new Story TreeSludenl Writing 
Con tt'nt. 

Any .student throuj^h grade 9 is eligible. Stories must be com- 
posed on Story lYee, using the program's t)ranehing feature. 
A panel of noted educators and authors wiUjudge entries. Prizes 
will be awarded on each of two levels: (1) Through Grade 6; 
(2) Grades 7, 8, 9. 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 38 




Grand Prize for EACH Level: An Apple He cO 

an Apple lie for each winning student's classroiiiQ^/ 

10 Honorable Mentions for EACH Level: High-interest 

Schola,slie Software programs worth $100. 

Contest begins November 1, 1985. Entries must be received by 
April 1, 1986, "Winners will be announced in May 1986. 



' L>~ 



i-M~hi'iikiir}\ti\\'i^ii'YiitTi\'iAikyi=u-v\-hk'^r\i'9rii\\\ii^ 



m 

The boid numbers 

indicates The 

manufacturers these 

deolers represent. 

I— APPLE 

2— MACINTOSH 

3— IBM 

4— COMMODORE 



ALABAMA 



HflB Csmpulers 
206 Cox Creek Parkway 
Florence, AL 35630 
(205) 764-3000 (1,4) 

Sequential Systems, InL 
The Computer Cottoge 
1420 Glenn Street 
Decatur, AL 35640 
(205) 355-9273 (l,J,4| 

SirsCon Computen 
1609 Bridge Avenue 
Northport, AL 35476 
(205)339-8241 (1,2) 



ALASKA 

Compulerldnd of Anchorage 

502 W. Northern Lights 

BWd. 

Anchorage, AK 99503 

(907)561-5191 (1) 



ARIZONA 

Computer Horitsni 

3631 East Indian School 

Road 

Phoenis, AZ 8501 B 

(602) 957-7369 14} 

Sohwore City 

58] 1 Eos! Speedwoy 
Tucson. AZ 85712 
(602)721-1008 1 1,3,4) 



ARKANSAS 

Micro Computer Center 
3900 North Front Street 
Foyetieville, AR 72701 
(501) 443-0007 (!| 

Micro Computer Center 
1413 Market Place 
Jonesbaro. AR 72401 
(5011932-2675 (3| 

Micro Computer Center 
3502 S, University 
Little Rock, AR 72204 
(501)565-3481 |2| 

Micro Computer Center 

1901 Eost Mam 
Russellvllle, AR 72801 
(501)968-8066 |2] 



CALIFORNIA 

The Byte foctory 

319 Mom Stree' 
Suite #2 

Salmos, CA 93901 
(408) 757-0788 (4) 

I.W.ChriitCorii. 
1110 Shodie Drive 
Campbell, CA 95D0S 
(408)378-8811 (1| 

Computer iase 

1950 Lake Tphoe Blvd. 
S. Loke Tahoe, CA 95731 
(916)544-6502 |1| 

Compu Worfd 

1767-F Tribute Road 
Sacramento, CA 95815 
(916)924-9607 (1) 

Golden Wetl 
91 Lourel 

Porterville, CA 93257 
(209)781-6700 (!,4) 



Informox 

1 Corporote Center 
1320 Willow Poth Rd 
Concord, CA 94520 
(415)689-4400 (1| 

Infofmox 

3124 "D" Crow Canyon 

Place 

San Ramon, CA 94583 

(415)838-1027 (1) 

Informal 

761 Eost Blithedole 
Mill Valley, CA 94941 
(415)388-7775 (I) 

Informoir 

1310 Mount Diablo Blvd. 
Wolnut Creek, CA 94596 
(415)935-5153 (1) 

Sehwaire Centre, Intenrotionol 

Willows Shopping Center 
Concord, CA 94520 
(415)674 0222 (1,3) 

Software Gelerjfl 
290 Battery Street 
San Froncisco, CA 9411 1 
(4)5) 397-6901 (3) 



COLORADO 

Computer link 
2850 Ir.s 

Boulder, CO 80302 
(303) 444-7300 (4) 



DELAWARE 

Product) Plus 

1274 South Governor's 

Avenue 

Dover. DE 19901 

(302) 734-1519 (1,3,4) 



FLORIDA 

Belt Software SeFvicei 
1011 Chokecherry Drive 
Winter Springs, FL 32708 
(305) 695-4003 (1,1,3,4| 

Computer Center 
7143-D North 9th Ave. 
Between Olive Rd. & 
Creighton 

Pensacola, FL 32504 
(904) 478-6558 (4| 

Computer Scer^e 

1641 N,E 163rd St. 

North Miami Beoch, FL 

33162 

(305)945-1014 |1,2) 

DotoSou 

8962 State Rd #84 
Dovie, FL 33324 
(305) 474-3355 (1,3) 

Education Computers Etc. 
1651 N. Monroe 
ToUahossee, FL 32303 
(904)581-0786 (I) 

Family Computer Center 
1711 North Pine St. 
OcqIo, FL 32670 
(904) 622-9090 (4| 

ffeathkil 

8262 Arlington 
Jocksonville, FL 32211 
(904) 725-4554 (3) 

SEl Computer 

1705 University Blvd. N. 
Jacksonville, FL 32211 
(904) 743-7050 (1,!| 

Soffwort Forum 

2305 Ponce de Leon Blvd. 
Coral Gobies, FL 33134 
(305)441-2983 (1| 

Sunshine Discount Softwatv 
956 N.E. 62nd St. 
Ft. Lauderdole. FL 333-34 
(305) 493-5047 (1,1,3,4) 




Dealer 



GEORGIA 



Caidind Computers 
903 N. Glenwood Ave, 
Dalton, GA 30720 
(404) 226-0502 (4| 

future Systems 

2525 Woshington Road 
Augusta, GA 30904 
(404) 737-8313 (!,2,3| 

Software City 
5500 Abercorn St. 
Sovonnoh, GA 31 405 
(912)352-7638 (1,4) 

Softwore City 

2483 Airport Thruway 
Columbus, GA 31904 
(404) 327-9573 (1( 

Software forum 
125 Peochtree St. 
Atlanio. GA 30303 
(404) 584 9833 (1,2) 



HAWAII 

Software Library 
805 Pohukoino Street 
Honolulu, HI 96813 
(808)533.1123 (2| 



IDAHO 

ET Computer Institute 
Pocatello Mall 
Pocotello, ID 83201 
(208) 232-2900 (1) 

Software Center Narthwest 
1020 Mom St, 
Boise, ID 83702 
(208) 336-4242 (2,3) 

Software Galeria 

1850 Eosi 17th St 
Idaho Foils, ID 83401 
(208) 524-0891 {2| 



ILLINOIS 

A Byte Belter 
1313 Fifth Ave 
Rockford, IL 61 108 
(815)964-1545 (1,3,4) 

Cinarco-Elltott 
Computer Center 
2200 36th Ave. 
Moime, IL 61265 
(309)797-0137 (1,3) 

Computer tree 

1022 W. Lincoln Hwy 
DeKalb, IL 60115 
(8151 758-8666 |1.2,3,4) 

Disk n Tech 

151 48 S. Logronge Rood 
Orland Pork. IL 60462 
(312)460-1060 |1) 

Softwoire Centre 
8219Ck)lf Rood 
Niles, IL 60648 
(312)965-9044 (1,3,3,4) 

Softwore City 
2304 Rono Rd. 
Arlington Hts, IL 60004 
(312)259-4260 |1,2,3,4) 



INDIANA 

Computer Comer 
6720 E Stole Blvd. 
Fort Wayne, IN 80690 
(219)493-6505 (4) 



Horbcurtown Sales 
21 hlorbourtown Shoppes 
Noblesville, IN 46060 
1(800)422-7495 |1) 

Software City 
6502 Grope Rood 
Mishawaka, IN 46545 
(219)272-9709 (1,2.3,4| 

Software Galeria 
9431 N, Meridian Street 
Indionopolis. IN 46260 
(317)843-9815 (1,3) 



IOWA 

Cirtorco Elliott Audio 
Visual & Computer Center 
234 West Third 
Davenport. lA 52801 
(319)324 0639 (1,1) 

Cosmos Computers 
1721 Grant St. 
Bettendorf. lA 52722 
(319)355-2641 (4) 

Iowa BoobSupply Compony 
8 S. Clinton 
lowo Cily, lA 52240 
(319)337-4188 (4) 



KANSAS 



The Bottom Line Computers Inc. 
1948 S, 291 Highway 
Clothe, KS 66062 
(913)8291600 (J,2) 

Computer Centre 
136 S. Mur-len 
348, PO Box 4000 
Olathe, KS 66062 
(913)829-3110 (3) 

Cotnputer Trend 
1038 S. Oliver 
Wich.to, KS 67202 
(316)686-5100 (1,2) 

Computer Trend 
9930 College Blvd. 
Overlond Park, KS 66210 
(913)451-8151 (1,2) 

Hitec Computer Center 
1210 S. Hock Rood 
Wichita, KS 67207 
(316)685 1131 (1,4) 

Mojestic Electroriin 
3995 E Horry 
Wichita, KS 67218 
(316)682-7559 (1,3,4) 

Software Centrejleowood 
3732 West 9Slh 
Leov^ood, KS 66206 
(913)341-6711 (1,2,4) 



KENTUCKY 

lexirsgton Computer Store 
2909 Richmond Rood 
Lexington, KY 40509 
(606)268.1431 |1,21 



LOUISIANA 

Computer Shoppe, Inc. 
3828 Vererans Blvd. 
Metoirie, LA 70002 
(504) 454-6600 (1,1) 

Software Mart, Inc. 
3300 W. Esplonode Ave. N. 
Metoirie. LA 70002 
(504)836-2198 (1,3,4) 



Software Solutions 
Bon Morche Mall 
Baton Rouge, LA 70806 
1504)928-2613 (1,2,3,4,) 



iX^AINE 

Home Port Computers 
129 Mom St. 
V/oterville, ME 04901 
(207)873 2192 (1,1) 

Pierre's Electronics 
50 Exchange St 
Portlond, ME 04101 
1207)772-8017 (1,2,3,4) 



MARYLAND 



The Program Store 
V/hite Flint Moll 
11301 Rockville Pike 
Kensington, M,D 20895 
1301)984-1233 (1,2,4) 

Rockville Soles 
11807 Idlewood Rd, 
Silver Springs, MD 20906 
(301)946-1564 (1,2,3,4) 



MASSACHUSEnS 

Arel Computer Products 
1 Washington St. 
Tounton, MA 02780 
(617)824-4254 11,4) 

Computer Concepts Home Centre 
Store 47A Honover Mall 
Hanover, MA 02339 
(617)826 6842 (1,3,4) 

Computers Etc. 
216 Newbury St. 
Peobody, MA 01960 
(617)535-5252 |1,!| 

Computer Magic of Walthom 
795 Moln SI 
Woltham. MA 02154 
(617) 893 3626 |3,4) 

Counter Intellijente 
33 Beoch 5t- 
Manchester, MA 01944 
(617)526-1517 (2) 

General Computer Stores 
Homilron Plozo West 
680 Worcester Rd. 
Fromingham. MA 01701 
(617)872-2084 (1,2,3) 

Instortt Software 
427 Great Road 
Acton, MA 01720 
(617)263-0418 (2,4) 

Instant Softyrore 
355 Boylston St. 
Boston, MA 021 16 
{617)353-1582 (2| 

Instant Software 
1 70 Worcester Rood 
Wellesley, MA 02181 
(617)235 6652 (1,3) 

Personal Computer Resources, he. 
45 Pond St. 
Norwell, MA 02061 
(617)8715396 (1,2) 

Tech Computer Store, Inc. 
19 Alewife Brook Pkwy, 
Combridge. MA 02140 
(617)497-0395 (1,2) 



MICHIGAN 

Advancecf Monagement Systems 
1016 S. Washington Ave 
Hollond, Ml 49423 
(616)396-6821 (1,2) 

Advanced Management Systems 
2838 Henry St 
Muskegon, Ml 49441 
(616)739-3395 (1,1) 



TTie Commodore Connection Ltd. 
1013 North Johnson St. 
Boy City, Ml 48708 
(517)892-8115 (4) 

Computers Plus' 

a Div. of the Olsen Anderson Co. 
106 S. McLellan St 
Bay C.ty, Ml 48706 
(517)393 9568 (1,2) 

The Other Computer Store 
214 W. Sovldge Street 
Spring Lake. Ml 49456 
(616)842-1891 (1,2) 

Software Carousel 
4270 Plainfield N E 
Grond Ropids. Ml 49505 
(616)361-1381 (1,2,3,4) 

Software City 

3971 17 Mile Rood 

Sterling Heights, Ml 

4B078 

(313)978-3701 (1,2,1) 

!he Software Shop 
4977 Livernoiz 
Troy, Ml 48098 
(313)524-1581 (2) 

Software Trends 
230 South Main St. 
Clcwson, Ml 480)7 
(313) 288-3280 (4) 

Strom Discount Computer 
42189 Ann Arbor Rd 
Plymouth, Ml 48170 
(313)455-8022 (1,1,3,4) 



MINNESOTA 

lecrm Electro4ilcs 
Central Sc^uore Moll 
Grond Rapids, MN 55744 
(218)326-6684 (1,2) 



MISSISSIPPI 

ComputerLand 
461 1 8th St 
Meridian, MS 39305 
(601)482-8523 (1,2,3,4) 



MISSOURI 

The Bottom line Computers, Itsc, 
800 N. 7 Highway 
Blue Springs. MO 64015 
(816)228-1800 (1,2| 

The Bottom line Computers, Inc. 
316 S- 291 Highway 
Liberty, MO 64068 
(816) 792-1500 (1,2) 

!he Computer Junction, Inc. 
852 Country Corners 
Washington, MO 63010 
(314)239-7544 (3,4) 

lifestyle Computers 
Clayton Center 
Ellisville, MO 63011 
(314)227-5577 (2) 

Softwoire Center International 
7748 Forsyth Blvd. 
Clayton, MO 63105 
(314)863-7611 (1,2,3,4) 

Softwoire Centreilndepender^ce 
3801 S. Nolond Road 
Independence, MO 64055 
(816)461-3838 (1,2,4) 



MONTANA 

Computer People 
2304 West Moin 
Bozemon. MT 59715 
(406) 587-9544 (2) 



NEBRASKA 

Computer Trend 
341 1 W. Center 
Omoha, NE 68124 
(402) 392-0208 (1,2) 



80 FAMILY COMPUTING 



lOWCASE • SHOWCASE • SHOWCASE • SHOWCASE • SHOWCASE • SHOWCASE • SHC 



Computer Weil 
4525 South l:34lh 
Omaha, NE 68137 
(402)330-6110 |l.2| 

SoffwDft Sourtc 
8610 Cass Sireel 
Omoho, NE 681 14 
(402) 397-4958 |1,2,3) 



NEVADA 

Cenlury 13 

4S30 MeodowJ Lone 
Los Vegos, NV 89107 
(702)870-1534 (1,2) 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Entre Compuler Center 
Melody Mall, S, Willow St. 
Manchester, NH 03103 
(603) 624-0300 (J) 

Entrf Computer Center 
1981 Woodbury Ave 
Portsmouth, NW 03801 
(603)431-2400 (J| 

Instonl Software 
35B Lowell Rd- 
Hudson, NH 03051 
(603) 883-80S0 |1,J) 

Instant So^are 
82 Main St. 
Keene, NH 0343) 
(603) 352 3736 |4) 

Initont Softwcre 
Nashuo Moll 
Noshuo, NH 03060 
(603) 889-0084 |2,4) 



NEW JERSEY 

Computer Encounter 
1225 Siote Hwy, 206 
Princeton, NJ 08540 
(609) 924-8757 (1,5) 

Compuler Run 
1 1 N. Broodwoy 
Pitnon, NJ 08071 
(201)589-4444 (1,3,4| 

Family Computer Center 

636 Rte 46 

American Woy Outlet 

Moll 

Fairfield. NJ 07006 

(201)882-8370 (4| 

Fcmilv Compuler Center 
154 Valley St. 
South Ororige, NJ 07079 
(201)762-6661 (1| 

Uvingiton Csmputen, IrK. 
508 S. Livmgston Ave. 
Livingston, NJ 07039 
(201)9941148 |1,J) 

The Pr*9rom Slore 
1344 Willowbrook AAall 
Woyne, NJ 07470 
(201) 785 2165 |1,S,3,41 

Softwoire Centt* 
90 Route 22 West 
Springfield, NJ 07061 
(201)379-4434 |1,3) 

SoftwortCity 

3100 Quakerbridge Rd, 
Homilion, NJ 06619 
(609)890-1066 (1,3,4| 

Software City 
85 Godwin Ave. 
Midland Pork, NJ 07432 
(201)447-9794 (1,2,3,4) 

Softworp City 
200 Wanaque Ave 
Pomplon Lakes, NJ 07442 
(201)831-1004 (4) 

Software City 
80 Brood Si- 
fedbonk, NJ 07701 
(201) 747-6490 (1,2,3,4) 



Seftwote City 
161 Cedar Lane 
Teaneck, NJ 07666 
(201)692-8318 [1 ,1,3,4) 

Software Goleria 
440 Rte 46 West 
Porsippcny, NJ 07054 
(201) 882-9797 (1) 

Village Computer Software 
Center Inc. 

Morris County Mall 
Cedar Knolls, NJ 07927 
(201)540-0505 (1) 



NEW MEXICO 

Micro Center 

7618 Menaul Blvd. 
Albuquerque, NM 871 10 
(505) 292-7848 (1,3) 

Team Electronics 

1522 Mesilto Volley Moll 
Las Cruces, NM 88001 
(505) 522-9767 (1,3) 



NEW YORK 

AML Supplies Division 
71-38 W.yrlle Ave 
Queens, NY 1 1 385 
(718)326-1110 (4) 

Adirondack Compuler Supply 
496 Cornelia St. 
Plattsburgfi, NY 12901 
(518)562-0659 (1,4) 

Anudato 

Plaia 9 Rte. 9 N. 
Fishkill,NY 12524 
(914) 896-5777 (3) 

Computer Auisted Leoming Inc. 
1406 Fulton St. 
Brooklyn. NY 11216 
(718)638-4379 (l,2,3,4| 

Computer Factory Outlet 
1048 Union Rd. 
South Goto Plozo 
WestSeneco, NY 14224 
(716)674-7200 (1,4) 

Computer Hesourc? 
7 Woshington Ave 
Endrcott, NY 13760 
(607) 757-0442 (3) 

LK Software 

401 Tarrytown Road 
White Ploms, NY 10607 
(914)662-7460 (1) 

Micro Images Industn'es, Inc. 
164-06 Cocheron Ave. 
Flushing, NY 1 135B 
(718)445-7124 |l,3,4) 

Software City 

187 Moln Street 

Mt. Kisco, NY 10549 

(914)666-6036 (1,2,3,4) 

Slftwar^ City 

641 North Broadway 
North White Ploins, NY 
1 0603 
(914)946-1800 (1) 

Software City 
2848 Erie Blvd. E. 
Syrocuse, NY 13224 
(315)445-2577 (4) 

Soflwort Center 
1 14-47 Queens Blvd. 
Forest H lis, NY I 1375 
(718)793-8112 (1 ,2,3,4) 

Sysut Computers 
2505 Avenue U 
Brooklyn, NY 11229 
(718)743-8303 (4) 



NORTH CAROLINA 

The Compuler Store 
4344 Fayetteville Rd. 
Lumberton. NC 28358 
(919)738-3755 (1,4) 




Dealer 



The Computer Wotftihop 
1483-A Akers Center 
Gosiomo. NC 28054 
(704)861-9030 (1,1) 

Digiti 

3015 Hillsborough St. 
Raleigh, NC 27607 
(919)828-5227 |3) 

Software Express 
140 Brevard Court 
Chorlotte. NC 28202 
(704) 372-9087 |2,3) 



NORTH DAKOTA 

ComputerLond sf Forgo 
3217 13th Ave. 
Fargo, ND 58103 
(701) 237-3069 (1,2,3) 

Ultra Inc. 

408 E Broodwoy 
Bismorck, ND 58502 
(701)258-2546 (1,4) 



OHIO 

A.D.S. Systems Inc. 
1306 Brondywine Blvd 
Zonesville, OH 43701 
(614)454-6853 (1,2) 

Sosic Computer Syiterrti 
942 Greot Eost Plaza 
Miles, OH 44446 
(2 1 6) 652-0056 (4) 

Big Syles 

1301 Boordmon-Poland Rd. 
Poland, OH 44514 
(216) 758-0009 (1,2,3,4) 

Eorthrite 

1731 Brice Rd. 
Columbus, OH 43068 
(614)363-1100 (3,4) 

f^ersonol Computers Co. 
7178 West Blvd. 
Youngslown, OH 44512 
(216)753-6607 (1,1,3) 

Software Galetio 
28809 Chogrin Blvd- 
Cleveland, OH 44122 
(216)464-7757 (1,1,3,4) 

Software Centre of Conton 
4037 H.lls 8. Doles Road 
Canton, OH 4470B 
(216)492-9163 (1,3) 

Software City 

584 Miomiburg 
Ceniervllle Rd. 
Centerville, OH 45459 
(513)439-1237 (1,1,3,4) 

Software City 

5890 Mayfield Road 
Clevelond, OH 44124 
(216)473-8124 (3) 

Software City 

81 3 Boordman Poland Rd. 
Youngstown, OH 445 1 2 
(216)758 6687 (3) 

Software More 

43 E. 6th St. 
Cincinnati, OH 45202 
(513)721-4455 (1,2,3,4) 

The Program Store 
829 Bethel Rd. 
Columbus, OH 43214 
(614)457-1153 (12,3,4) 

The Program Store 
4442 Cross Roads 
Columbus, OH 43232 
(614)663-0051 (1,4) 



OKLAHOMA 



Compuler Asfocialei 
2301 West Main St. 
Norman. 0< 73069 
(405)360-6818 12) 

Video-Comp 

1030 N.W. 38th St. 
Lowlon, OK 73502 
(405) 355-9798 (1,2,4) 



OREGON 



Learning Servkei 

2677 Wilbkeniie, Suite 5 
Eugene, OR 97401 
(503) 683-3827 |3) 

Link Three 

1815 N.W, 169th Ploce 
Suite 6000 Building 6 
Beoverton, OR 97006 
(503)645-5416 (3) 

Softwoire Centre 

1 1386 Beoverlon-Hillsdale 

Hwy. 

Beoverton, OR 97005 

(503) 626 8696 |3) 

PENNSYLVANIA 

AB Computers 
252 Bethlehem Pike 
Colmor, PA 18915 
(215) 822-7727 (1,1,4) 

Basic Computer Systems 
2481 £. Stote St. 
Hermitage. PA 16148 
(412)342-5505 |4] 

Basic Computer Systems 
4814 McKnighi Rd. 
Pittsburgh. PA 15237 
(412)367-1456 (4) 

The Computer Source 
546 Penn Ave 
W. Reading. PA 19611 
(215)375-4231 (1,2) 

EostCoosI Softwore 
49 Derrytown Moll 
Hershey, PA 17033 
(717)533-8125 (1,2,3,4) 

The Flofipy Disk 

5224 Simpson Ferry Rood, 

Windsor Pork Shopping 

Center 

Mechanicsburg, PA 17055 

(717)6976813 (4) 

Morgan's Computer & Edjcolion 

Center 

535 Cloirton Blvd. 

Pittsburgh, PA 15236 

(412)653-6150 (1,2) 

Nationwide Computer Products 

1380 Soulh Pennsylvonio 

Ave, 

MorrisvJIe, PA 19067 

(215)295-0055 (1) 

Pittsljur^H Computer Store 
612 Smithdeld Street 
Pittsburgh, PA 15222 
(412)391-8050 (1,2) 

Pittsburgh Computer Store 
47 Cloirton Blvd 
Pleosont Hills, PA 15236 
(412)655-8220 (1,2,3) 

Quinn Compuler Supply 
506 Broadway 
Scronton, PA 18505 
(717)347-6050 (1,3,4) 

Seme Hole in the Wall 
6394 Costor Avenue 
Philadelphio. PA 19149 
(215)533-1211 11,4] 



SoFtwoiit Cenlet Inti 

Loncaster & Plonk Avenue 
Pooli, PA 19301 
(215)647-8616 (1,2,3) 

Sofware City 

55 E, Germontown Rd 
Norristown, PA 19401 
(215)277-6050 (3) 

Software City Discount 
108 Lincoln Highwoy 
Foirless Hills, PA 19030 
(215)943 4544 (1,2,3) 

Software Golerio 

700 W, Loncosler Ave., 

Devon Sq. Shopping 

Center 

Wayne. PA 19087 

(215)687-1590 (1,2,3,4) 

Software Unlimited 
934 V/cxjdbourne Rood 
Levtttown, PA 19056 
(215)949-0400 (1,1,3,4) 

Summit Computer Center 
6 Eost Willovj Grove 
Philadelphio, PA 191)8 
(215)247-3660 (1) 



RHODE ISLAND 

Microlimtts 

10 Cedor Swamp Road 
Smilhfield, Rl 02917 
(401)231-3252 (1,4) 



SOUTH CAROLINA 

Horiion-Cf^mmodore Super Stores 

347 South Pleosonlburg 

Drive 

Greenville, SC 29607 

(803) 235-8659 (4) 

Horiion II 

3715 E. North St. 
at Loehmonn's Ploza 
Suite 101 

Greenville. SC 29615 
(803) 244-9039 (4) 

The Softwore Hous, Inc. 
7565 Rivers Ave. 
Charleston, SC 29418 
(803) 797-6860 (1,2,3,4) 



SOUTH DAKOTA 

Ultia Inc. 

210 E. Kemp Ave. 
Wotertown, SD 67502 
(605) 882-2239 (1,4) 



TENNESSEE 

Stewart Software Co. 
4646 Poplar Ave , 
Suite 107 

Memphis, TN 38117 
(901)767-89)4 D) 



TEXAS 

The Computer Won + Plus f- 
109 W Hornbeck/ 
P.O Box 670 
Fort Stockton, TX 79735 
(915)336-7431 (1,2,4) 

Custttm Computer Senricet 
1280 Hawkins Blvd. 
El Poso, TX 79925 
{915)594-1176 (3) 

Softwaire Centre 

5290 Belt Line ot Montfort 
Dollos, TX 75240 
(214)991-6911 (1,2) 

Software Goleria 
Wilbwbrook Court 
Houston, TX 77068 
(713)580-6922 (1,2,3) 

Software Ink 
4020C Kemp 
WichilQ Falls, TX 76308 
(817)696-0817 (1,2.3,4) 



Soft Warehouse, Inc. 

14580 Beltwood Pkwy E. 
Suite 109 
Dollos, TX 75234 
(214)386-9174 (1,2,3) 

The Softwore Place 
6369 Wesiheimer 
Houston, TX 77057 
(713)781-1488 (1,2,3) 

Team Electronics 193 
1236 Son Jocinto Mall 
Boytown. TX 77521 
(713)422-0630 (1,2,3) 

Tli-Stor Computer Centers 
40 I West loop 340 
Waco, TX 76710 
(817)772-5560 (1,1) 

VIRGINIA 

Family Computer Center 
1 191 Seven FoirOoks Mall 
Foirfox, VA 22033 
(703) 385-2758 (1) 

I/O Computer 

7558 Virginio Drive 
Norfolk, VA 23505 
(804)583-1609 (1,3,4) 

Joclr Hortmon 

2840 Peters Creek Rd. 
Roanoke. VA 24019 
(703)362-1891 (1) 

The Program Store 
6201 Arlington Blvd. 
Seven Corners Center 
Falls Church, VA 22044 
(703) 536-5040 (1,1,3,4) 

SoftworeCenter, inc. 
841 1 Old Courthouse Rd. 
Vienna, VA 22180 
(703) 356-3600 (1,1,3,4) 

Softwore City 

3B25-B S. George Moson 

Drive 

Falls Church. VA 22401 

(703) 845-9393 (3) 

Software Plus 

7596 West Brood Si. 
Richmond, VA 23229 
(804)285-2170 (1) 

WASHINGTON 

Lakeside Computers 
1200 Cooper Point Rd. 
Olympia, WA 98502 
(206) 786-0909 (1,2,3) 

Micr^ Computer Systems 
1512 SE Everett Mall Woy 
Everett, WA 98204 
(206) 355-4300 (2) 

WISCONSIN 

Genevo Compuien, \nt, 
124 E. Geneva Square 
Loke Geneva, Wl 53147 
(414)248-2776 (1) 

Sofwoire Centre 
2229 So. lOSth St, 
West Allis, Wt 53227 
(414) 545-5727 (1,1,3,4) 

learn Electronics 
2207 Grond Ave. 
Wousau, Wl 54401 
(715) 842-3364 (1,1) 

The Computer Centre 
5940 Dona Rd, 
Madison, Wl 53719 
(608) 274-5580 (1,1) 



"For information about 
becoming a 
SHOWCASE DEALER, 
contact FIRST 
SOFTWARE CORP,, 
17-21 Bollard Way, 
Lawrence. MA 01843 
(617) 689-0077." 



NO\Ti;MnEF! 1985 8 1 



Arrays, Inc./ Continental Software 




THE HOME AC COUNTANT 

and Financial Planner for the Macintosh' 




IT'S AS SIMPLE AS USING YOUR FINGERS AND TOES... 



Over a quarter of a million people have used THE HOME 
ACCOUNTAiNT to master their personal finances and gain 
better control over how they spend their money. Now, to 
complement the power and ease of use of the Macintosh , 
Arrays, hic./Continental Software has developed THE HOME 




ACCOUNTANT and FINANCIAL PIANNER for the 
MACINTOSH. This program, designed from the ground up for 
the Mac, is simple enough for a child to use, yet powerful 
cnotigh to handle the most complicated personal or small 
business accounting requirements. 

Arrays, inc./ 

Continental 

Software 



6711 Valjean Avenue* Van Nuys, California 91406 • (818)994-1899 
CIRCLE READER SERVICE 3 



This Month!! 

GAME STRATEGY, pa^c 84 
COMPUCOPIA. page 90 
CONTEST, paife 90 




r\ 



FOR THE COMPUTER GE 




Edited by Anne Krueger 



Attention Gamers: 
Here Comes Accolade! 



Accolade \ 'ak-a- lad. - lad \ n 
la: a mark of acknowledgment: 
AlVARD b: an expression of praise 
S an up-and-coming software com- 
pany created by Alan Miller and 
Bob Whitehead. 

If you've played Chopper Con-i- 
mand or Robot Tank, you're familiar 
with the vivid and exciting style of 
Alan Miller and Bob 'Whitehead. Alan 
started programming games at Atari 
and soon joined Bob Whitehead (and 
others) to form Activision. Moving 
on to expand their horizons. 
Alan and Bob co founded Accolade 
and are now designing a new gener- 
ation of entertainment software. In 
an inlcrvicw with Alan Miller, k-pow- 
eh's Special Ks di.scovered what Ac- 
colade has in store. 

Special Ks: Wliat kind of games will 

Accolade produce? 

Alan Miller: For the most part, they 
will be graphic adventures and sim- 
ulations, with elements of arcade ac- 
tion. 

What we're basically striving for at 
Accolade arc games with more real- 
ism. A video game should be more 
like a movie: a player should feel like 
an actor, rather than a spectator. 
Accolade games will have better 
graphics, music which will enhance 
the emotions felt by the player, and, 
most importantly, a strong emphasis 
will be on character development. 

Special Ks: What products do you 
have in ihe works? 

Miller: We have contracted some otit- 
of-housc designers to create games 



under the Accolade name. Software 
Heaven in San Diego. California is 
making Sundog 2.0. an overall im- 
provement on the original. Sydney 
Software of Ottawa. Canada, will be 
creating The Dam Busters, in which 
you pilot an Allied World War II 
bomber, alletnpting to blow up ene- 
my dams. 

Bob Whitehead is working on a 
game called Hardball. This is a 
baseball simulation that will let you 
view play from a variety of camera 
angles. It's also a "real-time" game, 
which means that an hour of game 
time is an hour of regil time. The 
game will provide you with a list of 
major-league teams to use. 

Mike Lorcnzen is designing The 
Psi-5 Trading Co. that will place you 
in the captain's chair of a space 
freighter. You'll choose your crew 
from a roster of names, each having 
his/her own skills and personality 
traits. You'll have to deal with deep- 
space breakdowns, piracy, and even 
hijacking. 

I'm creating Law of the West, a 
graphic adventure in which you're 
the marshall of a small town on the 
vvestern frontier. You must interact 
with the various citizens and deal 
with any ouUaws that ride your way. 
How yoti relate with people in the 
beginning of the game is how they'll 
act to you later on — so think before 
you act. 

These games will be on sale for the 
Commodore 64 for S29. and the 64K 
Apple II scries for S34. 

Special Ks: How do you design your 
games ... in teams or solo? 





Accolade's HARDBALL simulates realistic 
baseball action. (Insert) Alan Miller, 
cofounder of Accolade. 

Miller: 1 used to design games from 
top lo bottom on my own. but I've 
found that the overall product is su- 
perior when designed by a team of 
specialists. For example, Vm assisted 
by a professional composer and a 
graphic artist who give the games 
music and graphics that are quite 
impressive. 

Special Ks: How did you get started 

in designing and programming com- 
puter games? And what advice do 
you have for kids w-ho are interested 
in programming? 

Miller: After getting a degree in elec- 
trical engineering at the University 
of California at Berkeley, I worked 
for a few years in the computer in- 
dustry. I got my start in software de- 
sign as a programmer of Atari 2600 
cartridges. 1 have since moved on 
and now make games for home com- 
puters. 

My advice to kids who arc aspiring 
to be software designers would be 
not only to take courses in program- 
ming, but in addition take them in 
art and music. This will help tre- 
mendously. Graphics, after all, are 
only paintings on a computer. 



NOVIiMBEK 1985 83 



TIPS, 



RICKS, AND HINTS 



SWORD OF KADASH 

Penguin Software. Arcade/adventure . 
Your mission: to enter the ominous 
Fortress of the Dragon and retrieve 
the legendary' Sword of Kadash. 
You'll have to slay a slew of deadly 
guards, avoid a virtual kaleidoscope 
of devious traps, and collect fabu- 
lous weapons and treasures on the 



way to your destiny with the Sword. 
(Hints and game for Apple, C 64. | 

^Mw Monsters don't move when 
you leave a room. If a room has more 
than one entrance [or a particularly 
large one), stand in it as far from 
the monsters as possible. Then draw 
them toward you, firing as they ap- 
proach. When they arc almost upon 



you, duck out of the room. Go into 
the room from the other side (or oth- 
er entrancci, and repeat until you 
kill them all. 

<^M» When the computer puts a 
new room on the screen, it draws 
any secret doors last. If you watch 
carefully you usually can see them 
being placed. — specl-u. ks 




Free one or two of the blades on the far 
right. Don't take the shield or get caught by 
the blade on the right. Then release the 
bats and they'll run into the blades. Next, 
set the two knives on the far left free. 
Make sure they are moving together so you 
can gel the scrolls and exit through the 
top. 



On this screen, getting the sword creates a 
blade which can be shot and destroyed. 
W)U also must shoot ihe rings before get- 
ting them. There is a secret door at the 
bottom center of the screen that creates 
monsters and darts. 



Enter from the bottom right-hand passage 
and shoot the sixth boulder from the left 
before it reaches screen bottom. Once at 
the top of the screen, don't take the symbol 
before you take the scroll — the scroll is 
cursed! 





^i=i=^o:rii. 



There is a secret door in the floor of the 
passage to a pit. If you don't delay upon 
entering the room, you can reach it safely 
just as the first arrow passes. 



Ignore this room the first time you reach it. 
Two rooms later there is a halhway filled 
with cursed items. Take alt of the items and 
return to the room pictured above for the 
scroll. Before you take the scroll, however, 
shoot out the invisible blocks in the groove 
in order to give the blade a place to go. 



Move to the top of the right wall and fire 
up. Then go to the left wall and fire diago- 
nally up and to the right. Return to the 
right wall and run to the secret door you 
just opened, (Ves, you will have to take 
some damage. That's why the healers are 
there.) 



CAPTAIN GOODNIGHT AND THE ISLANDS OF FEAR 



Broderbund. Arcade /adventure. Your 
mission: With infinite courage, an 
indefatigable spirit, and a competi- 
tion model yo-yo, you set out to stop 
the nefarious Dr. Maybe's scheme to 
blackmail the world. But first you 
must make your way to Doom Is- 
land, using a plane, boat, subma- 
rine, and the old "shoe-shine ex- 
press." Good luck. Captain, and 



don't forget your trusty Secret De- 
coder. (Hints and game for Apple.) 

<^i^ Jet: The only way to get to the 
Araan Desert without dying is to de- 
stroy every radar station. Memorize 
the pattern — there arc four stations 
before Potia Inlet, and two after- 
wards, if you have trouble, the next 
best wav is not to shoot the first ra- 



dar station and be blown up. Then 
you can fly across the top of the 
screen, dodging the aircraft, as 
cruise missiles will only fly in 
straight paths. 

"^^ Araan Desert: When you sec an 
enemy robot, duck and fire from 
that position until it's destroyed. If a 
robot doesn't fire, don't duck. 



84 F.-\MILV COMPUTiNG 




Destror the sateltite dish or fall prcY to the 
Star Wan defense system. 

<^fM» Odom Island: 11 a robot ihrows 
a grenade, run toward it until the 
grenade goes over your head. Then 
duck and keep shooting until the ro- 
bot is blown up. Some robots take 
three hits to kill, so try to give your- 
self as much space as possible, 
^^■v Motorboat: Don'i push the 
joystick all the way forward. You 



need lo be able to stop quickly. 
When the bombers fly high, you 
should move fast so that the bomb 
passes behind you. If the bomber 
flies low or at medium height, stop. 

•w^ Modo Island: Wlien a robot be- 
gins to appear at the edge of the 
screen, stop. Then fire, making sure 
your shot hits, and move so the ro- 
bot is off-screen. Repeal until it's 
blown up. While in the lank, don't 
stop moving or else the grenade- 
dropping robots will jam your 
treads. When you use the helicopter, 
fly to the top of the screen before go- 
ing forward. That way you won't be 
shot by the laser cannon. 

^^tmm Doom Island: Fire when you 
sec a rol3ot. and then run away from 
the grenade. Keep it up for a sure- 
fire way to destroy them. Use the 
same strateg.v against the berserkers 




As soon as the grenade passes overliead , 
duck and fire. 

as you did against robots in the 
Araan Desert. 

i^hav Some fun (but dumb) things 
to tr\': run off the end of the dock: 
put in the wrong password: don't de- 
stroy the satellite antenna dish: loi- 
ter around for awhile; and go the 
wrong way in the Araan Desert. En- 
Joy! — SPECIAJ. Ks 



H 



N 



H 



N 



RESCUE RAIDERS, sir tech Soft 
ware (Apple). Strategj'/arcade. Your 
mission: to destroy the enemy time 
machine with your demolition truck 
in eight different battles. 

i^kBv At the beginning of a battle, 
pick up five men in your helicopter. 
Fly all the way across the screen. 
past the enemy lime machine. Ig- 
nore the heat-seeking missile chas- 
ing you, and drop your men into the 
little bunker beyond the time ma- 
chine. Although you'll probably lose 
your 'copter, this will prevent the en- 
emy from creating any more vehi- 
cles. This lakes some practice, and 
can get extremely difficult in higher 
levels. However, once done, it will 
make your life a lo( simpler. 
— CHAKUES i.Ai, 14. Newbury Park. 
Calijornia 

COSMIC BALANCE ssi (C 64, 

Atari, Apple. IBM PC/PCjr). Strategy/ 
construction set. Your mission: to 
construct a fleet of ships and fight 
them against the computer or an- 
other player. 

^^^ Try lo keep your speed a few 
lightmils below ma.Kimum, so even if 
some of your drives are destroyed. 
you can still make maneuvers. 
Ab» if your crew is greatly out- 



numbered by enemy marines, com- 
pletely drain all the shields and set 
course for another one of your ships. 
When the enemy captures it. it 
shouldn't be too difficult to destroy 

the ship. — JEREMY T. GOEMAAT. 13. 

Biisscy. Iowa 




Explore the fantastic world of King's Quest 
II. 

GHOSTBUSTERS ActiMsion 

(C 64 1 . Arcade/skill. Your mission: to 
save the day by capturing ghosts, 
earning more money than you start- 
ed with, and struggling to the lop of 
the Temple of Zuul to prevent the 
Gatekeeper and Keymaster from 
teaming up. 

<^*"» When you're typing in your 
name and account number, enter 
GOO as your name and all the is you 
can as your number. This will give 



you well over 8200,000. —mark de- 
LURSKI, 14. Carteret. New Jersey 

BEYOND CASTLE WOLFEN- 

STEIN. Muse Software (C 64), Ar- 
cade/adventure. Your mission: lo 
penetrate Hitler's bunker and assas- 
sinate him, 

c^MB To get lo Hitler, follow these 
directions. Level 1: up, right, up, 
up. up. up, right, right, down, right, 
up, use elevator. (On this level you 
must also find the bomb.) Level 2; 
up, up, up, up, right, up, righl, 
down, down, down, down, down, 
use elevator. Level 3; down, down, 
right, right, up. up, left. up. right. 
To escape, simply reverse the path. 
— JASON M. MAHSit. 13. RicManci. 
Washington 

KING'S QUEST // Sierra On Line 
(IBM PC/PCjr). Graphic adventure. 
Your mission: to rescue the maiden 
Valanice from her prison in an en- 
chanted land, and marry her. 

<^i^ Pray that you have a silver 
cross lo protect you from evil. 

"•^ It's not polite to look under 
beds unless invited. 

^Mi» Shell-collecting is a profitable 

hobbv. — SPECIAI. Ks 



N0\'EMbt;K 1985 85 




MUSIC PROGRAMS 



BY JOEY 



As a child, one of the 
lirsi pieces ofclassical music 
I remember hearing was 
"The Nil (cracker." a ballet 
by the Russian composer 
Peter Tcliaikovsky. Act II of 
"The Nutcracker" takes 
place in the fairyland realm 
of a handsome young 
prince and features a se- 
ries of dances. The most famous is Dance of the Sugar- 
Plum Fairy. I loved it because of the unusual harmonies 
and the bell-like sounds whicli were emitted from an in- 
slrumenl called a rrlesta. 

In .Microiones this month, you can dance off to l'air\'!nd 
by typing our version of Dance of llxe Sugar-Plum Fairy 
into your computer. It's been condensed and arranged 
for three parts. EnjoyI 




A 



APPLE H SIR\ES/DANCE OF THE SUGAR-PLUM 
FAIRY 



10 DIH N(113,2) 
20 FOR I = TO 
30 FOR I = 1 TO 
^0 N(I+8,1) = Hi 
50 FOR I = 17 TO 
60 rJCI+S0,1) = N 
70 FOR I = 43 TO 
80 FOR I = 93 TO 
90 HOME:VTAB 10 
100 PRINT "DANCE 
110 FOR i = 1 TO 
120 POKE 8,N<I,1 
130 NEXT I: GOTO 
1000 DATA 165,8, 
1010 DATA 2A0,8, 
1020 DATA 165,7, 
2000 DATA U4,i, 
2010 DATA 144,4, 



36:READ A:POKE 768+1, A:NEXT I 
8:READ N(I,1 ) ,N(I,2) 
I,1):N(I+8,2) = N{I,2):NEXT I 

42:READ N(I,1),N(I,2) 
a,1):N(I + 50,2) = N(I,2):NEXT I 

66;REA0 N(I,1),N<I,2);NEXT I 

113:READ NCI,1),N(I,2):NEXT 1 
HTAB 5 

OF THE SUGAR-PLUM FAIRY" 

113 
):POKE 6,20*NCI,2):CALL 768 
110 

201,2,176,2,169,2,74,133,10,164,8 
173,48,192,234,234,136,208,251,56 
229,10,133,7,176,235,198,6,208,231,96 
72,4,128,4,64,4,121,4,60,4,153,4,76,4 
60,2,72,2,60,4,64,4,76,4,72,4,31,2 



2020 DATA 81,2,81,4,85,2,85,2,85,4,91,2,91,2,91,4 
2030 DATA 96,2,72,2,91,2,72,2,96,4,60,1,64,1,72,1 
2040 DATA 81,1,85,4,60,2,72,2,60,4,64,4,45,4,47,4 
2050 DATA 60,2,60,2,60,4,64,2,64,2,64,4,72,2,72,2 
2060 OATA 72,4,76,2,64,2,72,2,64,2,76,4,96,1,108,1 
2070 DATA 121,1,128,1,72,2,85,2,72,4,76,4,0,4,81,2 
2080 DATA 96,2,81,4,85,4,0,4,91,2,108,2,91,4,96,4 
2090 DATA 0,4,96,1,76,1,64,1,47,1,72,4,0,2 



M 



ATARI 400, 800, 600/800XL, & 130XE/ DANCE 
OF THE SUGAR-PLUM FAIRY 



PI =P1+1: SOUND 1,0,0,0 
P2=P2+1:SOUND 2,0,0,0 
P3=P3+1:SOUND 3,0,0,0 



10 DIM V1<104,2),V2(92,2),V3{95,2> 

20 FOR 1 = 1 TO 104:f)EAD P,D: VI (1,1 J=P:V1 CI,2)=D:NEXT I 

30 FOR 1=1 TO 92:READ P,D: V2CI,1)=P:V2CI,2)=D :NEXT I 

40 FOR 1=1 TO 95:READ P,D : V3(I,1 )=P: V3(1,2)=D :NEXT I 

50 POKE 752,1:PRINT CHRS(125) :POSITION 4,12 

60 PRIM "DANCE OF THE SUGAR-PLUM FAIRY" 

70 P1=1:P2=1:P3=1:T1=0:T2=0:T3=0 

80 SOUND 1,V1(P1,1),10,6 

90 SOUND 2,V2(P2,1),10,6 

100 SOUND 3,V3(P3,1>,10,4 

110 T1=T1+1:T2=T2+1:T3=T3+1 

120 IF T1=V1(P1,2) THEN T1=0: 

130 IF T2=V2(P2,2) THEN T2=0: 

140 IF T3=V3(P3,2) THEN T3=0: 

150 IF P1=105 THEN 70 

160 FOR D=1 TO 12:NEXT D:60T0 80 

1000 DATA 0,4,47,4,0,4,42,4,0,4,40,4,0,4,50,4 

1010 DATA 0,4,47,4,0,4,42,4,0,4,40,4,0,4,50,4 

1020 DATA 0,4,40,2,47,2,40,4,42,4,50,4,47,4,53,2 

1030 DATA 53,2,53,4,57,2,57,2,57,4,60,2,60,2,60,4 

1040 DATA 64,2,47,2,60,2,47,2,64,4,0,4,0,4,40,2 

1050 DATA 47,2,40,4,42,4,29,4,31,4,40,2,40,2,40,4 

1060 DATA 42,2,42,2,42,4,47,2,47,2,47,4,51,2,42,2 

1070 DATA 47,2,42,2,51,4,0,4,0,4,40,2,47,2,40,4 

1080 DATA 42,4,50,4,47,4,53,2,53,2,53,4,57,2,57,2 

1090 DATA 57,4,60,2,60,2,60,4,64,2,47,2,60,2,47,2 

1100 DATA 64, 4,0,4, B,4,47,2, 57,2,47,4, 50,4, 0,4 

1110 DATA 53,2,64,2,53,4,57,4,0,4,60,2,72,2,60,4 

1120 DATA 64,4,0,4,64,1,50,1,42,1,31,1,47,4,64,4 

1130 DATA 96,4,81,4,96,4,72,4,96,4,68,4,96,4,72,4 

1140 DATA 96,4,81,4,96,4,72,4,96,4,68,4,96,4,72,4 

1150 DATA 0,4,64,2,81,2,64,4,72,4,85,4,81,4,91,2 

1160 DATA 91,2,91,4,96,2,96,2,96,4,102,2,102,2 

1170 DATA 102,4,64,4,72,4,81,4,0,4,0,4,60,2,81,2 

1180 DATA 60,4,60,4,42,4,40,4,47,2,47,2,47,4,53,2 

1190 DATA 53,2,53,4,69,2,69,2,69,4,64,4,68,4 

1200 DATA 85,4,0,4,0,4,64,2,81,2,64,4,72,4,85,4 

1210 DATA 81,4,91,2,91,2,91,4,96,2,96,2,96,4,102,2 

1220 DATA 102,2,102,4,81,4,72,4,81,4,0,4,0,4,68,4 

1230 DATA 72,4,85,4,0,4,76,4,81,4,96,4,0,4,85,4 

1240 EATA 72,4,81,4,0,4,72,4,81,4,72,4 

1250 DATA 193,4,0,4,193,4,0,4,193,4,0,4,193,4,0,4 

1260 DATA 193,4,0,4,193,4,0,4,193,4,0,4,193,4,0,4 

1270 DATA 193,4,162,4,193,4,144,4,193,4,136,4 

1280 DATA 193,4,128,4,193,4,114,4,193,4,102,4 

1290 DATA 96,4,182,4,193,4,96,1,108,1,121,1 

1300 DATA 128,1,136,4,193,4,144,4,204,4,162,4 

1310 DATA 194,4,173,4,173,4,173,4,128,4,173,4 

1320 DATA 114,4,128,4,243,4,128,4,128,1,144,1 

1330 DATA 162,1,173,1,193,4,162,4,193,4,144,4 

1340 DATA 193,4,136,4,193,4,128,4,193,4,114,4 

1350 DATA 193,4,102,4,96,4,173,4,193,4,162,1 

1360 DATA 173,1,193,1,217,1,230,4,173,8,85,1 

1370 DATA 96,1,108,1,121,1,128,4,193,8,96,1 

1380 DATA 108,1,114,1,128,1,144,4,217,8,108,1,121 

1390 DATA 1,128,1,144,1,162,4,182,4,193,4,128,4 



86 MMII.V COMPUTING 



HOW TO GET 

OVER $2000 WORTH OF NEW 

CAPABILITIES FOR YOUR 

COIVIIViODQRE64 




OR $599 



The Spartan'" is the Apple'" 11+ emulator for your Commodore 64'" that will open 

up a whole new world of hardware and software for youl Imagine adding these 
features to your Commodore 64'" for the Spartan'" price of S599; Q Apple '"11 + 
hardware and software capabilities □ 64K RAM expansion D four 
software selectable Commodore 64'" cartridge slots D non-dedicated 8-bit | 
parallel port D standard audio cassette deck capabilities for your C-64'". ^ 
The suggested retail value of comparable products offering only these „^^ 
capabilities is over S2200.00* — but the Spartan '" gives you much, much ^^fSi 
morel By building on your investment in your Commodore 64'"— an ^^^ 
excellent introductory computer — you create a whole new system -.^^m 
with both C-64'" and Apple'" 11+ capabilities. There is a whole other ^^^'^Sftia*" 
world out therel The huge selection of Apple '" II + hardware and ,.„„ J 
software is now yours to explore) Call toll free for the Spartan'" I 

dealer nearest you. ^ 



FOR INFORMATION WRITE: 

MIMIC SYSTEMS INC. 

1112 FORT ST., FL, 6G 
VICTORIA, B.C. 
CANADA V8V 4V2 



*AV prices quoted are In U.S. lunds, Itelghr and taxes noi Included. Value o( Components equlvalenf 
lolhe Spofran" syitom ore quoted Mom Apple" 11+ CPU ond Apple" 11+ single disk drive 1983 
llsl prices, ond (rom currcnl iuggoste^ list prices ond compoooni spedHcotlons of olher 
peripheral manufaclurers. Comniadoro 64"' and Commodoro logo are fradomarks ol 
Commodore Electronics ltd and'or Commodore Business MactilrH}s., Inc Apple" 11+ Iso 
hodomaik or Apple Computer Inc Spartan'" tsa Irademarh of Mimic Systems Inc. and has 

no association wittt Commodore Elecltonlcs or Apple Compufer Inc. The Sparlon" ii £^' 
mooutoclured by Mimic Systems Irvc. undei licenie granted by ATG £iBclj;oriics Inc. ol 

Weiorto. B.C. Canada 



TO ORDER CALL 

1-800-MODULAR 

(663-8527) 









^^4f. 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 28 




M 



COMMODORE 64 & 128 (C 64 MODE)/DtANC£ 
OF THE SUGAR-PLUM FAIRY 



10 DIM V1(18',,3),V2C92,3),V3<95,3) 

2fi S=54272 

38 FOR 1=0 TO 24:fiEAD A:POKE I+S,A:NEXT I 

40 X1=S+'i:X2=S+11:X3=S+18 

50 H1=S+1:L1 = S:H2 = S+8:L2=5+7:H3=S+15:L3=S+U 

60 FOR 1=1 TO 10A:R£AD V1CI,1 ),V1 (I,2),V1 (1,3) -NEXT I 

70 FOR 1=1 TO 92:READ V2(I,1 ), V2(I,2) , V2 (I,3J :NEXT I 

80 FOR 1=1 iO 9S:READ V3(I,1 ), V3(I,2) ,V3 t 1,3) :NEXT I 

90 POKE 53280,4:POKE 53281 ,0:PRINT CHR$(U7) 

100 POKE 2U,10:PRINT 

110 PRINT TAB<5);"DANCE OF THE SUGAR-PLUM FAIRY" 

120 PI =1 : P2=1 : P3=1 : T1 =0: T2=0: T3=0 

130 POKE H1,V1<P1,1):P0K£ L1,V1(P1,2) 

H0 POKE H2,V2(P2,1):P0KE L2,V2(P2,2) 

150 POKE H3,V3(P3,1):P0KE L3,V3(P3,2) 

160 POKE X1,17:P0KE X2,17:P0KE X3,17 

170 T1=T1+1:T2=T2+1:T3=T3+1 

180 IF T1=VUP1,3) THEN Tl =0:P1=P1 +1 :POKE XI, 16 

190 IF T2=V2CP2,3) THEN T2=0:P2=P2+1 :POKE X2,16 

200 IF T3=V3CP3,3> THEN T3=0:P3=P3+1 :POKE X3,16 

210 IF P1=105 THEN 120 

220 GOTO 130 

1000 DATA 0,0,0,0,0,68,68,0,0,0,0,0,28 

1010 DATA 133,0,0,0,0,0,28,133,0,0,0,15 

2000 DATA 0,0,4,42,62,4,0,0,4,47,107,4,0,0,4,50,60,4 

2010 DATA 0,0,4,39,223,4,0,0,4,42,62,4,0,0,4,47,107,4 

2020 DATA 0,0,4,50,60,4,0,0,4,39,223,4,0,0,4,50,60,2 

2030 DATA 42,62,2,50,60,4,47,107,4,39,223,4,42,62,4 

2040 DATA 37,162,2,37,162,2,37,162,4,35,134,2,35,134,2 

2050 DATA 35,134,4,33,135,2,33,135,2,33,135,4,31,165 

2060 DATA 2,42,62,2,33,135,2,42,62,2,31,165,4,0,0,4 

2070 DATA 0,0,4,50,60,2,42,62,2,50,60,4,47,107,4,67 

2080 DATA 15,4,63,75,4,50,60,2,50,60,2,50,60,4,47,107 

2090 DATA 2,47,107,2,47,107,4,42,62,2,42,62,2,42,62 

2100 DATA 4,39,223,2,47,107,2,42,62,2,47,107,2,39,223 

2110 DATA 4,0,0,4,0,0,4,50,60,2,42,52,2,50,60,4,47,107 



2120 


DATA 


2130 


DATA 


2140 


DATA 


2150 


DATA 


2160 


DATA 


2170 


DATA 


2180 


DATA 


2190 


DATA 


2200 


DATA 


2210 


DATA 


2220 


DATA 


2230 


DATA 


2240 


DATA 


2250 


DATA 


2260 


DATA 


2270 


DATA 


2280 


DATA 


2290 


DATA 


2300 


DATA 


2310 


DATA 


2320 


DATA 


2330 


DATA 


2340 


OATA 


2350 


DATA 


2360 


DATA 


2370 


DATA 


2380 


DATA 


2390 


DATA 


2400 


DATA 


2410 


DATA 


2420 


DATA 


2430 


DATA 


2440 


OATA 


2450 


DATA 


2460 


DATA 


24 70 


DATA 


2480 


DATA 


2490 


DATA 


2500 


DATA 


2510 


DATA 


2520 


DATA 


2530 


DATA 


2540 


DATA 


2550 


DATA 



4,39,223,4,42,62,4,37,162,2,37,162,2,37,162 

4,35,134,2,35,134,2,35,134,4,33,135,2,33,135 

2,33,135,4,31,165,2,42,62,2,33,135,2,42,62,2 

31,165,4,0,0,4,0,0,4,42,62,2,35,134,2,42,62 

4,39,223,4,0,0,4,37,162,2,31,165,2,37,162 

4,35,134,4,0,0,4,33,135,2,28,49,2,33,135,4 

31,165,4,0,0,4,31,165,1,39,223,1,47,107,1 

63,75,1,42,62,4,31,165,4,21,31,4,25,30,4,21 

31,4,28,49,4,21,31,4,29,223,4,21,31,4,28 

49,4,21,31,4,25,30,4,21,31,4,28,49,4,21,31 

4,29,223,4,21,31,4,28,49,4,0,0,4,31,165,2,25 

30,2,31,165,4,28,49,4,23,181,4,25,30,4,22,96 

2,22,96,2,22,96,4,21,31,2,21,31,2,21,31,4 

19,239,2,19,239,2,19,239,4,31,165,4,28,49,4 

25,30,4,0,0,4,0,0,4,33,135,2,25,30,2,33,135 

4,33,135,4,47,107,4,50,60,4,42,62,2,42,62,2 

42, 62, 4,37, 162, 2, 37,162, 2, 37, 162, 4, ?9,2?3, 2 

29,223,2,29,223,4,31,165,4,29,223,4,23,181,4 

0,0,4,0,0,4,31,165,2,25,30,2,31,165,4,28,49 

4,23,181,4,25,30,4,22,96,2,22,96,2,22,96,4 

21,31,2,21,31,2,21,31,4,19,239,2,19,239,2 

19,239,4,25,30,4,28,49,4,25,30,4,0,0,4,0,0 

4,29,223,4,28,49,4,23,181,4,0,0,4,26,156,4 

25,30,4,21,31,4,0,0,4,23,181,4,28,49,4,25 

30,4,0,0,4,28,49,4,25,30,4,28,49,4,10 

143,4,0,0,4,10,143,4,0,0,4,10,143,4,0,0,4 

10,143,4,0,0,4,10,143,4,0,0,4,10,143,4,0,0 

4,10,143,4,0,0,4,10,143,4,0,0,4,10,143,4,12 

143,4,10,143,4,14,24,4,10,143,4,14,239,4,10 

143,4,15,210,4,10,143,4,17,195,4,10,143,4 

19,239,4,21,31,4,11,48,4,10,143,4,21,31,1 

18,209,1,16,195,1,15,210,1,14,239,4,10,143 

4,14,24,4,9,247,4,12,143,4,10,143,4,11,218 

4,11,218,4,11,218,4,15,210,4,11,218,4,17,195 

4,15,210,4,8,97,4,15,210,4,15,210,1,14,24,1 

12,143,1,11,218,1,10,143,4,12,143,4,10,143 

4,14,24,4,10,143,4,14,239,4,10,143,4,15,210 

4,10,143,4,17,195,4,10,143,4,19,239,4,21,31 

4,11,218,4,10,143,4,12,143,1,11,218,1,10 

143,1,9,104,1,8,225,4,11,218,8,23,181,1 

21,31,1,18,209,1,16,195,1,15,210,4,10,143 

8,21,31,1,18,209,1,17,195,1,15,210,1,14,24 

'1,9,104,3,18,209,1,16,195,1,15,210,1,14,24 

1,12,143,4,11,48,4,10,143,4,15,210,4 



M 



I 



N 



News from ihe compuier-music from . . . Random 
House Sollware has announced the release of MaA/njf Mu- 
sic on Micros — a musical approach to computer program- 
ming by Dr. Fred T. Hofstettcr. The package includes step- 
by-step instructions and a disk loaded with songs, 
samples, sounds, and subromines. Making Music. 
S69.95 for ihc Apple II series and IBM PC/PCjr comput- 
ers, teaches BASIC programming, music composition, 
and displays music notation. 

For those Commodore 64 owners who've been jealously 
watching Macintosh users pull down menus and play 
with windows, this program's for you. From Broderbund. 
Wie Music Shop is available in standard C 64 and MID! 
format. It lets you write, edit. play, and print original 
music compositions. Included are several sample ar- 
rangements of popular and classical songs. The program 
is $44.95. 

In need of a good computer-music reference book? 



You've come to ihc right place. For Alari lovers, there's 
Dr. C. Wacko's Miraetc Guide to Desigitina and Prosrammins 
Vour Own Atari Computer Arcade Games. Us S 1 2.95 

(S29.95 with disk) from Addison Wesley, and contains a 
fun-lovinif. xany approach to creating sounds and music 
I'or your games. C 64 users will enjoy Bill L. Bchrendt's 
Music and Sound for the Commodore 64 from Simon and 
Schuster/The General Reference Group. This book — 
S14.95 IS29.95 with disk)— does a good job of taking the 
mysteiy oui of programming sound on the 64. and in- 
cludes a library of interesting sound effects. 

Also useful is Commodore Magic by Michael Calleir from 
E.P. Button's HarcySoft Press. SI2.95 (S21.95 with disk), 
and ADAM'S Companion from Avon Books. Chapter nine of 
ADAM'S Companion offers a thorough explanation of 
how music is made on the ADAM, and includes a table of 
frequency values for musical notes and technical info for 
creating three-vosec compositions. The book costs S9.95. 

—JOEY LATIMEK 



88 1'AMll.V COMI'UTING 




BRIGHT NEW STAR 
FOR A COMMODORE 
TO PRINT BY 





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Commodore and C-64 are trademarks of Commodore Business Machines, Inc. 
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Star's made-for-Commodore 
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You've got the computer. Now 
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cronies 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 43 



SHORT PROGRAMS BY J O H N J A I N S C H I G G 



Enter Simper Save, a machine-language progratn thai 
lets your Atari or Commodore 64 BASIC programs save 
and load whole blocks of memorj- to and from disk at su- 
per speed. Super Save is presented here in the form of a 
short BASIC program that ki:ads machine-language in 
from DATA statements, and stores it in a free area of your 
computers mcmon'. 

To cali Super Save In Atari BASIC, you use the expres- 
sion A = USRI 15:3r>.IOCB.OP.ADr<|--D.t-ll.ENAME-|,STAHT.B^TES|. lOCB 

is the number of the I/O channel through which you 
want to sa\'e or load — 1 through 6 are valid, ov is the 
command number for the tvpe of operation you want to 
perform: 8 to save. 4 to load. The third parameter lets 
you specify a fllename^ust put it between the quotes. 
START is the start address of the memory block you want 
to save, or the beginning of the target mcmon,- area you 
want to load to. bites is (he number of bytes in the 
memor\' block you want to save, or the nimiber of bytes 
you want to load. Don't worrv' — if you mess up the pa- 
rameters. Super Save won"i bomb . . . it'll simply stop 
your program with a special error code 175. 

To save a file with the Commodore version of Super 
Save, use the statement svs 49152. p.bot.tp.tilename'.w. 
130T (Bottom) is the start address of the memory block 
you want to save, tp (Top) is the end address [noi the 
number of bytes in the block!). Stick your filename be- 
tween the quotes. 

To load a block of mcmon,'. use sys 49152, i.'filename'.b. 
The block will load automatically into the memor\' area 
from which it was originally saved. 

ATARI 400, 800, 600/800XL, & UOXE/ SUPER 
SAVE 

18 FOR 1=1536 TO 1647;READ A:POKE I,A:NEXT I 
1000 DATA 10^,201, 5, 20s, 108,104, 208,97, 1W, 243 
1810 DATA 94,48,92,201,7,16,88,10,10,10 
1020 DATA 10,170,104,208,80,104,201,4,240,4 



1030 DATA 201,8,208,71,157,74,3,169,0,157 
1040 DATA 75,3,104,157,69,3,104,157,68,3 
1050 DATA 169,3,157,66,3,32,86,228,48,40 
1060 DATA 189,74,3,9,3,157,66,3,104,157 
1070 DATA 69,3,104,157,68,3,104,157,73,3 
1080 DATA 104,157,72,3,32,86,228,48,11,169 
1090 DATA 12,157,66,3,32,86,228,48,1,96 
1100 DATA 132,185,76,64,185,169,175,133,185,76 
1110 DATA 64,185 

Add these statements for a demonstration: 

19 REM —SAVE TEXT SCREEN TO DISK IN FILE "DiTEMP"— 

20 IOCB=1:0P=8:START=PEEK(88)+256*PEEK(89):BYTES=96O 
30 A=USR (1536, IOCS, OP, ADR<"D: TEMP"), START, BYTES) 

40 PRINT CHRS(125) 

49 REM —LOAD "D:TEMP" BACK INTO SCREEN RAM— 

50 0P=4 

60 A = LISR(1536,I0CB,0P,ADR("D:TEMP"),START,BYTES) 

69 REII —PRESS <BREAK> TO STOP PROGRAM— 

70 GOTO 70 

COMMODORE 64 & 128 (C 64 h\ODE)/ SUPER 
SAVE 

10 FOR 

1000 D 

1010 

1020 

1030 

1040 

1050 

1060 



1=49152 TO 49227:READ ArPOKE I,A:NEXT I 
ATA 32,67,192,165,21,208,23,165,20,240,20 
ATA 201,1,203,15,32,253,174,32,212,225,169 
ATA 97,133,185,169,0,32,213,255,96,32,67 
ATA 192,165,20,133,251,165,21,133,252,32,67 
ATA 192,165,20,72,165,21,72,32,253,174,32 
ATA 212,225,104,168,104,170,169,251,32,216 
ATA 255,96,32,253,174,32,158,173,76,247,183 

Add these statements for a demonstration: 

19 REM —SAVE TEXT SCREEN TO DISK IN FILE "TEMP"— 

20 BOT=1024:TP=204S 

30 SYS 49152,0,B0T,TP,"aO:TEMP",8 
40 PRINT CHR$(147) 

49 REM —LOAD "TEMP" BACK INTO SCREEN RAM- 
SO SYS 491 52,1," TEMP", S 

59 REM —PRESS <RUN/STOP> TO STOP PROGRAM— 

60 GOTO 60 



STUMP DR» KURSOR CONTEST 



You know Dr. Kursor. He's the guy 
who answers all the technical com- 
puter questions in k-power most 
months. Unfortunately, Dr. K's get- 
ting too big for his britches. In fact, 
he's acting like a real know-it-all 
these days. So we're asking our 
readers to send their toughest tech- 




nical questions to Dr. K. 

We'd appreciate questions iha,t are 
about computers in general, rather 
than machine-specific. That way the 
Doc can put them in his column and 
all our readers will be able to enjoy 
the answers. We'll throw all the 
questions that stump Dr. Kursor (he 



says there won't be many!) into one 
pile. Three wil) be chosen at random 
and authors of those questions will 
win $25! 

So send in your questions to: 
Stump Dr. Kursor Contest, c/o k- 
POWER. 730 Broadway, New York. NY 
10003. before Nov. 23. 



Namp Abp 


Address 




r.iiv .Statp 7jp 
Telephnnp ( ) 


Cnnipnterf';) I ii<^e 


Here are mv questions that will stump Or. Kurs^nr: 







90 FAMILY CO.MrUTINU 






With NRI training at home, you can . . . 

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V 



HP1 



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ill II \ 

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^ 






"""^^t^., 



y/ 



///y 



/y 



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And you can start by actually building NRI's 
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which experts have h;uled a-s the "most intriguing" 
of all tlie new IBM-compatibles. 

Even if you've never had ;iny previous 
training in eiecLi'onics, you can .succeed v^itli NRI 
training. You'll start with the basics, rapidly 
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you master advanced concepts like digital logic, 
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Difjtal Multimeter, that you keep. 

Leam to service today's computers 

You'll assemble Sanyo's intelligent keyboard, 
install the power supply and disk drive, and attach 
the hlfSi resf)lution monitor— all the while 
performing hand.SKin experiments ;uid demon- 
strations that reinforce your skills. 

As you complete your Sanyo, you grasp the 
"secrets'" that qualify you for a new career. You'll 



leam to progiTun in BASIC and machine language. 
You'll use utility programs to check out the Sanyo 
8088 microprocessor (the same chip used in the 
IB.M PC). And you also get over SLOOO wortli of 
.software, including WordStar and CalcSUir, 
Leam the basics at home 

Most importantly, you'll understand ttie prin- 
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maintiin, troubleshoot and .sen-ice computers. 

With NRI training, you'll le;uTi at home on 
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interfere with your current job, You'U learn at 



your own pace, in the comfrjrt and convenience 
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Send for free NRI catalog 

Let others worr>' about computers taking 
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Send the coupon today for NRI's l(X)-p;)ge 
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ing. It' the coupon is missing, write to NRI Schools, 
3939 Wisconsin Ave., Washington, D,C, 20016, 

IBM ts a Registered Trademafk o( International Business 
Machines Corporairon. 



n 



McGraw-Hill Continuing Education Center 
3939 Wisconsin Avenue, Washington, DC 20015 
We'll give you tomorrow. 

[B'CHECK ONE FREE CATALOG ONLY 
. Computer Electmnics with Microcomputers 
C Dala Comniun:calions 
Lj Roboiics & Induslrial Conlrols 
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CIRCLE READER SERVICE 29 



rJ 



Sensational Prices! 

. . . On Our Most Popular Items! 



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WHAT DO YOU GET 

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FOR CHRISTMAS? 



A Gift Certificate from 
TEN EX Computer Express!! 



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Give a gilt you know wift be appreciated . .a 
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Giti certificates are available for $25, $50. S75. $100. etc. (in 
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WHATS IN STORE 



SOFTWARE GUIDE 



QUICK TAKES ON SOFTWARE- 
NEW AND NOTEWORTHY 

Welcome to FAMILY computing's Software Guide, the most 
comprehensive Hsting available of two dozen of the 
newest, most noteworthy, and/or best programs on the 
market, Our reviewers include fomilies from oil over 
the country who have judged the software according to 
the following criterio: long-term benefits and applica- 
tions, odaptability, and advantages of using a comput- 
er for a given task. Programs have been evaluated and 
rated for their performance in each of the categories 
listed below. More detailed reviews follow the chart. 
Unless otherwise noted, all programs ore in disk format. 
Here's a rundown of the roting categories and what 
they mean: O = Overall performance, given the limi- 



tations and capacities of the particulor computer for 
which the software is intended. D = Documentation, or 
the instructions and literature that accompany a pro- 
gram. EH = Error-handling, the software's capacity to 
accommodate errors made by the user— an especially 
important considerotion with software for younger us- 
ers. PS = Play system, in the games reviews, the 
quality of the game design and the game's pjoyobility. 
GQ = Graphics quality, also evaluated in light of each 
particulor brand's graphics capabilities. EU = Ease of 
use after the initial learning period, which varies from 
computer to computer. V = Value for money, or how 
the software measures up to its price. 



HOME BUSINESS/HOME MANAGEMENT 



Title 

Manuf actu rer 

Price 



BETTER WORKING: 
FILE & REPOF^T 
Spinnaker Software Corp. 
One Kendall Square 
Cambridge, MA 02139 
(617) 494-1200 
S50 (C 64) 
$60 (Apple) ©1985 



BETTER WORKING: 

SPREADSHEET 

$50 (C 64) 

$60 (Apple) 

(See above for address and 

phone.) 



FILEMAKER 

Forethought, Inc. 
1973 Landings Drive 
Mountain View. CA 94043 
(415) 961-4720 
S195it)1985 



MICROSOFT WORD 
Microsoft Corp. 
10700 Northup Way 
Bellevue, WA 98009 
(206) 828-7400 
$195 ©1985 



PROTEUS 

Research Design Asso- 
ciates, Inc. 
P.O. Box 848 
Stony Brook, NY 11790 
(516) 928-5700 
$80 ©1985 



VIDEOWORKS 
Hayden Software 
600 Suffolk St. 
LowelL MA 01854 
(800) 343-1218 
$100 ©1985 



Brief 
description 



Hardware/ 
Equipment 
required 



Backup Ratings 

policy O D EHJGQEU V 



Creates files and allows ex- 
change of information with oth- 
er two programs in the Better 
Working series — spreadsheet 
(see below] and %vord processor. 
Well-written manual and person- 
alized report function make it a 
good clioice. ^-flescher 



Because of compatibility with 
the rest of the Better Working se- 
ries (see above). Spreadsheet 
can vastly improve home man- 
agement at an affordable price. 
Has most standard spreadsheet 
features, plus graphing ability. 



Ability to adjust formats easily 
makes this an outstanding data 
base. Amount of information 
stored Is limited only by room on 
disk. Simple enough for small 
jobs, powerful enough for small 
business use.* — aker 



A heavy-duty word processor for 
those who've graduated from 
MacWrtte. The many major fea- 
tures included make it a plea- 
sure to USe.+ — AKER 



This "idea processor" is a tool 
that encourages outlining before 
writing: use to narrow your topic 
or to develop ideas. Lacks real 
word processor capabilities and 
can't share files with one.t 

— SOLOMON 



Reviewed on 48K Apple: 
help screens require 
64K; Information trans- 
fer requires second drive. 
Also for C 64. 



Reviewed on 48K Apple. 
Also for C 64. 



128K Macintosh; second 
drive recommended. 



Reviewed on 1 28K Mac- 
intosh; second drive rec- 
ommended. Substantial- 
ly different version 
available for IBM PC/PCjr 
IS375). 



30-day warran- 
ty; $5 there- 
after. 



30-day warran- 
ty; S5 there- 
after. 



90-day warran- 
ty; $15 there- 
after. User 
makes backup. 



30-day WEtrran- 

ty. 



Reviewed on 64K Apple 
He, He with 80-column 
card. Also for C 64. 
Planned for IBM PC/PCjr. 



Animates MacPaint images into 
a sequence of pictures so 
smooth you'd swear you were 
watching MacTelevislon! Fun, 
educational, and practical, t 

— AKEB 



128K Macintosh. 



30-day warran- 
ty: SIO there- 
after. 



90-day warran- 
ty: S 10 fee there- 
Eifter for backup. 



* |N/A 
* 



* N/A 

* 
* 
* 



M/A 



RATIHOS KIT O Ch'crall performance; D Documenlatton; EH Error-handling; OQ Oraphlcs quail tj'; lu Kase ol use: ¥ Value for monn-; * Poor: ** Average: *** Gocd: 
**** Excellent: NVA N'ol applicable: E Easy: A Averai*e: D Difflrull: * Longer review follows chart 



NOVEMBER 1985 93 



EDUCATION/FUN LEARNING | 


title 


Brief 
description 


Hardware/ 
iquipment 
required 


Baclcup 
policy 


O 


Ratings 
D |EH|CQEU 


V 


RICHARD SCARRY'S 
BEST ELECTRONIC WORD 
BOOK EVER 
Coleco Industries 
999 Qualter Lane S. 
West Hartford, CT 06110 
(800) 842-1225 
S30 e:1984 


Expand early reader's vocabulary 
by matching colorful objects 
with words. Switch between 4 
skill levels at any lime, and go 
on a scavenger hunt to find ob- 
jects in word list. Good child- 
parent interaction. Ages 3-6. 

—DAVENPORT 


Coleco ADAM (cass.). 


30-day warran- 


* 

* 
* 


* 

* 
* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


E 


* 
* 
■k 


CHIPWITS 

Epyx 

1043 Kiel Court 
Sunnyvale, CA 94089 
(408)745-0700 
S30-S35 ©1985 


Reinforce beginning program- 
ming lessons by commanding 
and playing with Chipivits— 
greedy robots that understand 
pictures rather than words. An 
excellent adjunct to a program- 
ming course, but it's not a do-it- 
yourself learning tool. For ages 

10-)-.+ —SUMMERS 


Revlewed on C 64. Joy- 
stick. Apple Mac ver- 
sions from Brainpower. 
24009 Ventura Blvd., Ca- 
labasas. CA 91302. 


30-day warran- 
ty; SlO there- 
after. 


* 
* 


* 
* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


* 
■k 
* 
* 


E 


* 
* 
k 


FORECAST! 
CBS Software 
One Fawcett Place 
Greenwich, CT 06836 
(203) 622-2500 
S50 ■D1984 


Set up a home weather station 
by tracking temperature, baro- 
metric pressure, wind, and sky 
conditions. Produces surprising- 
ly accurate forecasts and devel- 
ops good scientific methodology. 
For ages 12-*-. — wjldman 


Reviewed on 48K Apple. 
Also for C 64; 128K IBM 
PC/PCjr with color graph- 
ics board. 


30-day warran- 
ty; 85 there- 
after. 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


* 
* 


N/A 


E 


* 
■k 

* 


MICROZINE NO. 8 


The eighth edition of a comput- 


48K Apple. Joystick, 
paddles, or optional Koa- 
laPad. 


60-day warran- 
ty; S5 there- 


* 
* 


* 

* 

* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 

* 


E 


k 

* 


Scholastic Software 


erized collection for kiri^i atfes R 


730 Broadway 


12. Includes mystery adventure. 






New Yorli. NY 10003 
(212)505-3501 






puzzles, and cartoons. All the 




©1984 


programs are easy to use, yet 














challenging and fun. — frank 












S30 thereafter. 










RAINY DAY FUN 
THORN EMI Computer 
Software Inc. 
1881 Langley 
Irvine, CA 92714 
(714) 261-6600 
S40©1984 


A classic toy chest on a disk! 
With a coloring book, dot-to-dot 
puzzles, Ptn the Tali on the Don- 
key, mask maker, mazes, and 
more, The menus consist of col- 
ored icons that even preschool- 
ers can understand. Most activi- 
ties have a print-out option that 
adds to the fun. Best for ages 

5-f.+ —SUMMERS 


Re\'iewed on C 64. Also 
for 48K Apple. 


90-day warran- 
ty: S9 there- 
after. 


* 
* 
* 
* 


* 
* 

* 
* 


* 

* 

* 


* 
* 
* 


E 


k 
k 
k 
k 


STICKYBEAR TOWN 

BUILDER 

Weekly Reader Family 

Software 

245 Long Hlli Road 

Middletown. CT 06457 

(203) 638-2400 

S30 (C 64) 

S40 (Apple) ©1984 


Children design a town, select- 
ing from a menu of buildings, 
parks, bridges, and other com- 
munity components. Deceptively 
simple, yet holds their attention. 
Helps develop an understanding 
of spatial relations, teaches basic 
map skills. For ages 5-9.+ 

— BUMOARNEK 


Reviewed on C 64. Also 
for 64K Apple. 


90-day warran- 
ty. 


* 
* 
* 
■k 


* 
* 

* 
* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


A 


k 
k 
k 
k 


TEMPERATURE LAB 
Hayden Software 
600 Suffolk St. 
Lowell. JktA 01854 
(800)343-1218 
8100 ©1985 


An extraordinary opportunity to 
discover the "whats" and "whys" 
of temperature by performing ex- 
periments and observing results. 
Complete lab kit contains disk, 
thermometer, temperature sen- 
sor, computer interface, and 
massive manual. Complex ideas 
become crystal clear; tremen- 
dous fun for ages 13 + .+ — MOfwis 


Reviewed on 48K Apple. 
Also for C 64. Apple II/II 
plus require SIO adap- 
ter from Hayden. 


90-day warran- 
ty; 810 fee for 
backup. 


* 

* 
* 


* 

* 
* 


* 
* 

* 
* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


A 


k 
k 
k 


VOCABULATOR 
Zephyr Services 
306 S. Homewood Ave. 
Pittsburgh. PA 15208 
(412) 247-5915 
830 ©1984 


Learn brief definitions of rarely 
used words (e.g., "vulpine," "dila- 
tory," "jabot." "rime," etc.). Flash 
cards and multiple choices are 
two teaching methods, plus you 
can customize with your own 
words. Repetitious and poorly 
documented. — bumgarnek 


Reviewed on 64K Apple. 
Also for 64K IBM PC/ 
PCjr. 


90-day warran- 
ty- 


* 
* 


* 


* 


N/A 


E 


k 
k 


RATINGS KIT O 0\Trall perfonnance; D DocumcnUUon: EH Errrjr-handlinq; GO Graphics qualir>': EV Ease of use: V Value for money; * Poor; ** Average: *** Good: 
**** E.tcellenc: N'.-\ Not applicable: t Easy: A Averasc; D Difficult: • Lonsrr review folloiis char! 



94 r-A.MiLY coMi'irriNG 



GAMES REVIEWS BY JAMES DELSON 






Title 

Manufacturer 

Price 


Brief 
description 


Hardware/ 
Equipment 
required 


Backup 

policy 1 


Ratings 

D PSGQIEUI 


V 


BEACH-HEAD 11 


Sophisticated foiiow-up to last 
years best-selling slraiegy/arcade 


C 64. Joystick(s). 
Planned for 48K Apple. 


30-day warran- 
ty: S 10 there- 
after. 87.50 for 
backup. 


* 
* 


k * 


* 
* 

* 


D 


* 
* 


Access Software. Inc. 


* 
* 


* 
* 


2561 S. 1560 W. 
Woods Cross. UT 84087 
{801)973-0123 
S40 ©1985 


game. 1-2 players attempt to lib- 
erate prisoners from the Dicta- 
tor's island fortress and escape 
alive. Four scenarios, for ages 
10-I-. 








BEAST WAR 
Avalon Hill 
4517 Harford Road 
BalUmorc, MD 21214 
(301) 254-9200 
$25 ©1985 


Lively, though extremely simpli- 
fied , hybrid of chess and arcade 
gaming. An inferior clone of Ar- 
cfion in play system, but good 
for younger and more inexperi- 
enced gamers. For ages 10+. 


48K Apple. Paddles/joy. 
stick optional. 


30-day warran- 
ty: SI there- 
after. 


* 
* 


* 
* 


■k 
■k 


* 


A 


* 
* 

* 


COMPETITION KARATE 
Motivated Software, Inc. 
80 Kancho Drive 
Mm Valley, CA 9494 1 
(415) 303-9005 
S35 ©1984 


One of the years best, combines 
the character-building features 
of a role-playing game with tlic 
streamlined play of a strategy/ar- 
cade program. A must for seri- 
ous gamers ages 12-i-.'f' 


48K Apple. Paddles op- 
tional. 


30-dav warranty: 
SIO fee 
thereafter. 


* 
* 
* 
* 


* 

* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


A 


* 

■k 
* 

* 


CRUSADE IN EUROPE 
MicroProse Software, Inc. 
120 Lakefront Drive 


Simplified wargame for all levels 
of expertise. Play short scenarios 
or tackle the campaign as 1-2 
players fight their way across 
Europe from the Normandy inva- 


Reviewed on 48K Atari. 
Also for 64K Apple: C 64; 
128K IBM PC/PCjr. Joy- 
stick optional. 


90-day warran- 


■k 


* 

* 
* 

* 


* 
* 


* 
* 


A 


* 
* 
* 


ty; SIO there- 


* 


after 
















(301) 667-1151 
S40 ©1985 






Bulge. Forages 12-i-.t 




















SATO 

Spectrum HoloByte, Inc. 
1050 Walnut. Suite 325 
Boulder. CO 80302 
(303) 443-0191 
S40-$50 ©1985 


The most sophisticated subma- 
rine simulation to date. Track 
and sink Japanese ships during 
W.W. II. controlling every aspect 
of sub's operations. First-rate 
graphics with realistic play make 
this great for ages 12 + .t 


Reviewed on 128K Apple 
He. Also for Apple lie; 
128K IBM PC/PCjr; 128K 
Macintosh. 


30-day warranty: 
$7.50 there- 
after; SIO for 
Macintosh ver- 
sion. 


* 

* 


* 
* 

* 
* 


* 

* 
* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


A 


* 
* 
* 
* 


GOLF'S BEST 


E.xciting golf simulation. 1-4 


Reviewed on 128K IBM 
PC/PCjr with color 
graphics adapter. Also 
for 64K Apple with color 


Unlimited war- 
ranty. 


* 
* 


* 

* 


* 
k 


* 

* 


E 


* 
* 
* 


1 Step Software, Inc. 
Charlotte Plaza. Suite 


players choose club, determine 
how hard and at what angle ball 
should be hit. then see shots 


#1300 

Charlotte, NO 28244 
(704) 364-1510 
S50 ©1984 
















predicted before hitting away. 
Suitable for ages 10-i-.+ 


monitor. 
































ON-TRACK COMPUTER 

MODEL CAR RACING 

Gamestar, Inc. 

1302 Slate Si. 

Santa Barbara, CA 93101 

(805) 963-3487 

S25 ©1985 


Not a bad race car simulation, 
but lacks good graphics and play 
system, 1-2 players choose driv- 
er's personality, length and sur- 
face of course, then steer, shift 
gears, and brake using joystick. 
Best for kids ages 8 + . 


Reviewed on 48K Atari. 
Also for C 64. Joystick. 


90-day 
warranty. 


* 


* 
* 


* 
* 


* 
* 


E 


* 
* 
* 


ROBOTWAR 

Muse Software 
347 N. Charles St. 
Baltimore. MD 21201 
(301) 659-7212 
S40 ©1981 


The classic robot construction set 
game, it's considered the bedrock 
on which all subsequent build-il- 
yourself programs are based. 
Write movement and strategy for 
a warrior robo t . For ages 12 + . 


48K Apple. 


Unlimited 
warranty; 
$10 fee for 
backup. 


* 
* 

* 
* 


■k 
* 
* 


* 

* 
* 


* 
* 


A 


* 

* 


WAR IN RUSSIA 
Strategic Simulations. Inc. 
883 Stlcriin Road, A-200 
Mountain View, CA 94043 
(415) 964-1200 
S80O1984 


, r 1 




30-day 


* 


* 


* 
* 

* 


* 
* 


D 


* 
* 


Exciting simulation of entire 
W.W. II Russian campaign. Divi- 
sion-sized units determine fate 
of Germany and Russia. Good 
play system, but nearly impossi- 




Also for 48K Atari, 


warranty: $10 
fee thereafter. 


* 
* 


* 

* 
* 


ble for Germans to win. A fas- 




cinating game for advanced 
players, ages 12 + . 




THE WIZARD OF OZ 
Spinnaker Software Corp. 
One Kendall Square 
Cambridge, MA 02139 
(617) 494-1200 
S27©1985 


Pleasantly diverting text-graphic 
adventure for children and nov- 
ice players, It retells classic fan- 
tasy (ales of L. Frank Baum. 
Easy to use, but graphics are 
dated.. For ages 10 + . 


C64. 


30-day warranly: 
S5 fee thereafter. 


* 

■k 
■k 


* 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 


E 


* 


BATIMOS KiT 0\-crall pcrrormiuicc; 9 Documcniallon: »* Play syslem: OQ Gniphlts quality: lU Ease of use; V Value for moni.-y; * FBor: ** Average: *** Gimd: 
■*■*** Excellent: ft! *•* to ****. depending on price: NVA Nat applicable: E Easy: A Average; D Dimcull: ♦ Lorjger Tfrvltw follows chart 



NOVEMBER 1985 95 



Still 

Cooking 

After 

All 

These 

^ars. 




Big 8th Edition 
100,000 copies 
in use worldwide. 



This friendly yellow box continues lo 
disappear from thousands of dealer shelves 
every day. There seem.s to be no end in sight. 

Now in its big 8th Edillon, MICRO 
COOKBOOK has been a consistent Best 
Seller for over 2 years. 

When we last looked, over 100,000 copies 
were being used by homemakers cooking for 
their families, singles cooking for Ihemsefves, 
and roommates cooking for each other 

And we're not sure we've counted all the 
caterers, part>' planners, home economics 
students, even television chefs. 

All people who like to eat, and want to 
have fun doing it. 

And now, there's more. We've cooked up 
14 excitingly packaged RECIPE DISKS to help 
you build your collection in a hurry. Believe us, 
we know what i( feels like to be a hungry 
Cookbook customer 

Remember too, MICRO COOKBOOK 
adjusts ingredient quantities to serving size, 
updates your shopping list, and offers ready 
reference for ingredient substitutions and 
nutritional information — all built in — 
all automatic. 

And more. 

". . . Micro Cookbook is really the American 
Dream. .."says the New York Times. 
Order your copy today 

Pinpoinf 

(fnrmerlv Virtual Combinalics) 

Box 13323 Oakland CA Mfifil 

(415) 530-172G 

Please send the big 8lh Edition of MICRO COOKBOOK 

and/or Itie RFCIPE DISKS I've marked below. 

Qty. Total 

Micro Cookbook $49.9f; $ 

Recipe Disks for Micro Cookbook SI9.95 ea. 

Soups & Salads MeaUess Meais 

Kids Cooker)' Special Diels 

Appelizcrs Desserts 

Daily Breads Wiik Cooking 

ftod Processor Cooking j 



Sales Tax % 

Shipping i 

TOTAL t 

Add G.SX sales lax if delivered in California. Add $3 

per order shipping. 

Name . 



Address - 
Cily 



State_ 



Zip_ 



□ Check or money order enclosed 

n Ctiarge my n Visa D Mastercard 

Eipiralion Date _ 



WHArS IN STORE 
SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



Signature . 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 50 

96 FAMILY COMI'UTIN'C 



On the following pages, you'll find 
in-depth reviews of some of the pro- 
grams listed in the Software Guide. 
Refer back to the Guide on page 
93 for information such as backup 
policies and addresses of software 
manufocturers. 



HOME BUSINESS/ 
HOME MANAGEMENT 

FileMaker 

l-IAriDVVAKK REQUIREMENTS: 128K 

Macintosh; second drive recom- 
mended. 

manufacturer: Forethought, Inc. 
PRiCE: $195 

High praise for FileMaker. While it's 
the fifteenth data base I've re- 
viewed — in ihe most heavily populat- 
ed category' of Mac software — I still 
found it absolutely refreshing. 

The amount of information stored 
is limited only by the room on your 
disk. And you are never kept to a 
certain number of categories per re- 
cord, nor characters per category. 
Deciding on formats ahead of time 
isn't necessary; you can change the 
length of any category, or add new 
ones, whenever you want. 

This freedom of design extends to 
switching among different fonts and 
styles, to adding on-screen lines and 
boxes that highlight information, to 
easily pasting in MacPaint or Mac- 
Draw images. 

FileMaker's unmatched and de- 
tailed on-screen measurements let 
you effortlessly coordinate your rec- 
ord format and any size label or pre- 
printed form — accurate to one-thou- 
sandth of an inch! In typical Mac 
fashion, you can browse at the click 
of a mouse. 

Documentation is styled after Ap- 
ples Macintosh manuals, down to 
the artsy photographs at the begin- 
ning of each chapter. It's easy to 
learn from and to read, and looking 
up information is a cinch. 

I can see broad appeal for File- 
Maker. The simple setup works well 
for small tasks, such as cataloging 
your videotape collection or handling 
a Christmas card list. Yet there's 
also enough power and flexibility to 
tackle bigger jobs in a small busi- 
ness. Ease of use is built in. since it 
was designed according to Macin- 
tosh software guidelines. Overall, 
FileMaker lives up to the manufac- 
turer's claim of having "no practical 
limitations." — sharon zardetto aker 



Microsoft Word 

HARDWARE fiEQUIRE.VlENTS: 128K 

Macintosh; second drive recom- 
mended. 
MANUFACTURER: Microsoft Corp. 

PlilCE: SI 95 

If your word-processing duties are 
growing too heavy for MacWrife, 
maybe it's lime to graduate to Mlcro- 
sojt Word. This writing tool offers 
many major features and dozens of 
finely wrought details, making it a 
pleasure to use. 

Automatic footnoting counts as a 
major feature. A separate window 
opens to type footnotes, which are 
added to your document during 
printing and are automatically num- 
bered. Then, if you add or delete a 
footnote, others will be renumbered 
without using extra commands. 
Footnotes may appear on the same 
page as the reference or all at the 
end. 

Save time with the Glossary, a dic- 
tionary of words, phrases, even 
short paragraphs you use often and 
don't want to type out each time. I 
defined Microsoft Word as mw for 
writing this review. Each time I type 
MW, followed by a simple key se- 
quence, Microsoft Word appears. 

Word offers multiple keyboard op- 
lions, minimizing mouse use by 
controlling cursor movements and 
scrolling. Work with up to four docu- 
ments at once, each in a separate 
window. And any window splits to 
view separate sections of the same 
document simultaneously. 

For more specialized needs. Word 
allows detailed document design. 
You can print in multiple columns; 
number pages with Arabic or upper- 
case or lowercase Roman numerals: 
or employ special paragraph for- 
mats, such as "open format." which 
automatically inserts a blank line be- 
tween paragraphs. 

The mail-merge feature permits 
you to varj' form letters according to 
your records. "Dear Valued Client . . ." 
or "Listen, you bum ..." become 
salutations, depending on how long 
the recipients have owed money. 
Create such records with Word or 
with File, Microsoft's Mac data base. 

One of Word's rare drawbacks is 
that you can't tell where pages will 
break without using a "paginate" 
command. If you make later changes 
to the text, on-screen page breaks 
don't change unless you "repagin- 
ate." which takes a few minutes for 
a large document. Another disadvan- 
tage is the lack of a spelling checker 



or a word-count feature, which one 
might expect from a major word pro- 
cessor like this. 

Those are quibbles, however, 
when compared to the advantages. 
Word would stand out. even if the 
field of Mac word processors were 
crowded. — shakon zardetto aker 



Proteus 

HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: Reviewed 
on Apple !Ic and fie. Also for C 
64; planned for IBM PC/PCjr. 
MANUFACTURER: Research Design As- 
sociates. Inc. 

PRICE: S80 

A blank page of paper. An empty 
computer screen. Both often intimi- 
date writers starting a piece and fre- 
quently cause lamentations like. 
"What do I write about? How should 
I begin?" 

So we postpone writing until the 
deadline nears, then rush to com- 
plete the assignment. This leaves lit- 
tle time to think through an idea 
and even less to revise. Yet. those 
awkward beginning moments can be 
overcome with techniques employed 
before the first draft. 

Proteus, an "idea-processor." Is an 
educational tool for developing such 
techniques. By writing down all our 
ideas on a subject, the theory goes, 
we can decide what to saj'^ and how 
to best approach it. 

Five "modules" aid organization. 
"Freewriting" makes it easy to jot 
down ideas without worrying about 
mechanics. "Looping" develops those 
ideas by focusing on Individual top- 
ics. "Listing" provides an orderly, 
numbered sequence. "The 5 Ws" — 
who, what, why, where, and when — 
help structure the facts. The fifth 
module, "Cubing," allows you to con- 
sider the subject from various ana- 
lytical perspectives. 

My 12-year-old daughter Debbie 
used Proteus before writing a mys- 
tery story for her junior high-school 
magazine. She began with "Freewrit- 
ing" to brainstorm about the plot, 
characters, setting, and conflicts. 
Then she worked with "Looping" to 
expand the story line and develop 
each character. "Listing" helped plan 
the sequence of events. 

A current-events assignment 
proved the usefulness of "The 5 Ws," 
and "Cubing " made an expository- 
wTiting project more explicit. Both 
the manual and on-screen prompts 
were very helpful. 

Unfortunately, Proteus lacks real 



iMI^^iltilllhli^i 



COMMODORE COMPATIBLE 
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AT BELOW DEALER COST! 



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PUBLIC NOTICE 

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IN THE COMPUTER 

INDUSTRY LEADS TO 

UNPROFITABLE LINE 

FOR BELL & HOWELL 

C.O.M.B. authorized to 

liquidate recent model 

printers at BELOW dealer 

cost! 



• Fast, 100 
characters 
per second! 

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• Heavy-duty 
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Compatible 
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Heces a sensational value on a fast-operating, 
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Compared to many competitive models. THESE 
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tiandle BIG office jobs, Ttie P-1(K has a memory 
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Ottier special features include: Easy loading, long- 
life cartridge ribbon. Crisp printing. And. with your 
purcttase. you get a TOLL-FREE phone number to 
call for useful tips or questions you might have. 

CHARACTER SET; Full upper and lower case 96 
character ASCII set with descenders and under- 
lining. Software selectable single or double wide 
character fonts. GRAPHICS: High resolution dot 
addressable graphics. 

PRINT FORMAT: 8" line length: 80 characters per line 
at 10 CPI: 136 characters per line at 17 CPI, 
PAPER SLEW jADUANCEl: 10 lines per second, stepper 
motor controlled. User selectable pressure roller 
or tractor feed. 

DATA INPUT: Parallel. Centronics type 7-bit ASCIL 
TTL level with STROBE. ACKNOWLEDGE returned 
to indicate data was received. SERIAL; RS232C. 
With BUSY handshake. 10 or 11 bits: 110. 150, 300, 
1200 Baud. INPUT POWER: 115 volts. 
PRINT RATE: 100 characters/second. Data Buffer: 
1K (Optional expandable to 2K). 
OPERATIONAL CONTROLS; Power on/olf, set top of 
form, select/deselect, line/forms, feed. i 

MEDIA: Roll paper: BV/'W x 5" dia. single ply or 
pressure sensitive multiple copy paper. ,012" 
max. thickness. Fan fold paper: 1" to 9V2" 



sprocket (including sprocket margins), .012" max, 
thickness. 

CUT SHEET PAPER: max. width. Wh". 

TYPE OF PRINTING; Impact bidirectional, 7x9 dot 
matrix for data printing, 11x9 matrix for corre- 
spondence printing. 

RIBBON: Continuous loop cartridge, 20 yards by 1 12" 
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90 Day Limited Factory Warranty 

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HI-SPEED MODEL P-150 

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width, impact logic seeking printing!. 50 yd loop 
cartridge ribbon: 10 million 
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1 5Vi" D X 7Vi" H. Weight: 25 9 V IC j€ 
lbs. Interface included. ^%9^7 

Herri H-71 0-63327-1 1 Ship, handling: S14 



Credit card members 

can order by phone, 

24 hours a dav- 

7 days a week! 



Toli-Free: 1-800-328-0609 



Your check is welcome! 

Ka delays when you pay by ctieck! 



C.O.M.B. CO. 

Authorized Liquidator 

14605 2BTH AVENUE NORTH 
MirilNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA 55*41-3397 



Price subjeci to chaiigi; after 60 days. 

Sales outside continenioi US are subjeci to 

spBCtfil Conditions Please call! or wnie to inquire 

C.O.M.B, CO>: hem H-710-63327-10 
14605 28th Ave. NVMinreapolis. MN 5S441 3397 
Please Knd items indicated below. [K^innesota residents add SK 
sales tax Allow 3-4 weeks tor delivery. Sorry, no CO Q. orders-] 
P-100 Piinterfs) with interface at S238 each plus S10 each 

for ship, handling: Item H-71 0-63327-10 
P-150 Printer[s| with imerfaco at S28S each plus S14 each 

Worship, handling: Item H7lO 63327-11 

C My ch^ck or money order is enclo&ed- |No delev> in procetiing 
orders paid by check, thanks to TeleCheck.) 

MasterCard ■'■' L'. VISA 



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NOVEMBEK 1985 97 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



word-processor capabilities and can't 
even share files with one. If you're 
used to word processing, you can get 
frustrated when you're not allowed 
to insert, delete, or revise. It's also 
annoying to recopy parts of your 
work when doing the first draft. De- 
spite the excellent outlining tech- 
niques Proteus encourages, it has 
definite drawbacks. — gwen solomon 



VideeWorks 

HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: 128KMaC. 

MANUFACTURER: Haydcn Software 

PRICE: $100 

Three letters alone do Justice to 
VldeoWorks: Wow! Animated Mac- 
Paint images create a sequence of 
pictures so smooth you'd swear you 
were watching MacTelevision. 

You can animate by recording each 
"frame" separately, clicking on the 
screen where you want the object to 
appear, or by dragging an object 
with the mouse and recording the 
entire movement. You can also cre- 
ate animation by specifying the di- 
rection and the number of pixels 
(screen points) that you want the ob- 



ject to shift between frames. 

Up to 26 objects can be moved at a 
time. Each has a defined plane, and 
appears to be passing in front of or 
behind other objects. To those mov- 
ing parts, add background scenery 
and sound effects. The overall pro- 
duction is controlled from an editing 










l^i-?*r^i^'jj^' 1 •• QQ 



window where you coordinate mo- 
tion with background and sound. 
(Steven Spielberg, move over!) 

The many options make the pro- 
gram seem a little complicated at 
first. But taken a step at a time, the 
creation of a full-scale animated 
computer show is really very simple. 



It's not easy enough for a child, 
though, so don't expect the under- 
10 set to handle it well. 

Adding MacPaint art is a snap: 
without closing VideoV^orks, a con- 
venient desk accessory helps paste 
in a MacPaint document. Or use the 
mini-MacPaint that's built in. If 
you're not the artistic type, "clip art" 
disks are always available. Hayden 
includes one filled with excellent 
MacPaint images for starters. 

If fun isn't reason enough to buy 
this program, items on the demo 
disk suggest more practical possibil- 
ities. There are traditional-style pre- 
sentation graphics — with bar graphs 
growing and pie charts baking be- 
fore your eyes — and video-style pre- 
sentation graphics that are more 
like a sitcom than a spreadsheet. 
Something educational? In one se- 
quence, a tuning fork channels "visi- 
ble" sound waves into an ear as the 
ear drum vibrates sympathetically. 

The animation quality is extraor- 
dinary, as are the enjojTnent and sat- 
isfaction. It's a rare piece of software 
that can be recommended without 
reservations. VideoV^orks is one. 

— SHARON ZARDETTO AKER 



YOUR GATEWAY TO THE GEOGRAPHY OF AMERICA! 



^^ 



(f's 2 o'clock in the morning and you've 

been clnving isnours. Destination Tlicson, 
Anzona to take on a load of copper. You're 
exhausted as you pull into Amarillo. 
Should vou get same sleep now and let 
your opporient get an edge on you or 
push on and risk an accident? You push 
on. Dawn hreaks as you speed through 
the desert revealing the mesa country. A 



siren interupts. . you get a sinking feeling 
as the state trooper pulls you over for 

driving Coo fast... i 

Long distance trucking is a tough way 
to make a living— but its a great way to 
learn about the geography of the united 
states. CROSSCOUNTRY USA is a rich and 
detailed simulation where vou and a 
friend play the role of truckers, 
competing witn each other to see vyho is 
the most efficient driver 




Its an exciting way to boost your knowl- 
edge of the U.S. and sharpen your 
strategy making skills. 

CROSSCOUNTRY USA features: 

• a large print map and computer maps 
of all SO states 

• players will learn the population and 
location of 180 cities and state capitals 

• dozens of graphics illustrating typical 
scenery 

• travel in all seasons (watch out for 
snowstorms in Colorado) 

• collect 50 different commodities 
(ranging from apples to zinc) 

• players deal with typical weather condi- 
tions, time zones and realistic hazards and 
opportunities 

• customizing ability so that you can 
adapt the program to your needs 

Suggested retail S39.95 (S49.95 in Canada) 
For the Apple II series W/64K ram 
Forages 10 and up 



See CROSSCOUNTRY USA at a store near 
you or write or call: 

" DIDATECH 
SOFTWARE 

Dept 549, BOX C34069 
Seattle, WA 98124-1069 i 

or ! 

Suite 549 -BIO W.Broadway 
Vancouver, B.CV5Z4C9 
phone (604) 687-3468 
CIRCLE READER SERVICE 13 



EDUCATION/ 
FUN lEARMIMG 

Chipwits 

HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: C 64. 
MANUFACTURER: EpyX 

PRICE: S29-S35 

MANUFACTURER'S SUGGESTED AGE: 8-12 

Memorizing the odd languages that 
computers use is often the hardest 
thing about learning to program. 
Not so when you play with Chip- 
wits— soflware that teaches problem 
solving and logical thinking— quali- 
ties needed by programmers at all 
levels. 

A "Chipwit" is a greedy robot that 
you teach using pictures, not words. 
You tell j'our robot what to do by us- 
ing a joystick to give picture com- 
mands. When you think your robot's 
set of commands is logically com- 
plete, try it out in one of eight 
games that range in difficulty from 
Sandbo.\ (easy) to M.l.T. (difficult). 

Chipwits provides a complete pro- 
gramming environment. In the 
"Workshop." select commands ("op- 
erators") from a picture menu and 
place them in sockets. A second 




menu then appears, showing which 
components ("arguments") will work 
with each command. Commands 
range from simple to complex, pro- 
viding sophisticated control. 

If the game robot performs poorly, 
enter the "Debug" mode. Here, ac- 
tion progresses in slow motion or 
one command at a time, while the 
robot itself turns and beeps on- 
screen. The program's only real 
drawback is that it takes too long to 
switch between the "Debug" and 
"Game" modes. 

Chipwits is an excellent adjunct to 
a programming course for those over 
10, but it's not a do-it-yourself learn- 
ing tool. The documentation is too 



HOW TO 
TAME YOUR INFORMATION 

TEA/v\-MATE, W(MTE FILE, ond HOME OFFICE 
ore fully Integrated software progroms 
designed to rrianoge your data so you 
con whip rfiousonds of nomes and 
numbers inro shope. 

Use rfie word processor to rnove a 
porogrophi or transfer text from file ro 
ffle. You con even generate a form and 
cusromlze ir by merging Information from 
rhe file manager or by merging 
spreodsheer numbers. 

Monlror your budget, cosfi flow, ond invest- 
ments with the spreodsheer. Use Ir to help 
plon shopping ond coupon use. 

Keep on rop of appointments, criticol 

dotes and events with rhe 

file monaQet. Let Ir help 

you organize inventories, reseorch notes, or fomily 

heolth records. 

PLUS G(\APH creores pie chans, line graphs or bar grophs 
ro illustrare trends, morket shore, and profitability. 

You'll see that rhe performonce, quality, end price will 
help you tome rhe facts with eose. 

FortheC-64' C 136' ?liA 4" ond Man ■ 
P.O Oox 1 1300. 5onio Ano CA 927 11 
For more informotion on where to buy Tri Micro 5ofrwore C7145 632-6707. 





/f^n(, . from the creators 
ofMATHBLASTERr 




ALGE-BLASTERr 

Learn the abc^s of 
a^ + b^ = c^ 



ALGE-BLASTER! is the most com- 
plete algebra program ever put on 
one disk. Master all the fundamen- 
tals: positive and negative numbers, 
monomials and polynomials, factor- 
ing, and equations— 670 problems in 
all! Receive step-by-step tutoring. , , 
earn graphic rewards for right 
answers . . . add new problems with 
Davidson's easy-to-use editor. . . and 
enjoy sound effects, score-keeping 
and print features, and much, much 
more. 7th-12th grade. Apple™ II 
family (64K). IBM™ version 
available 11/85. 

Educational Software 
That Works . 

Davidson & Associates, Inc. 

800-556^41 

(In Calif., ZI3-5344070) 




Davidson. 



Davidson & Associates, Inc. 

3135 Kashlwa Street 
Torrance, CA 90505 



■\ 



/^ 



\ 



NEA' 



Please send tne a FREE COLOR BROCHURE and the name of 
tny nearest Davidson Oealet, 

Name^ 



Glty 



.State. 



.Zip_ 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



stingy with examples to let a begin- 
ner work alone. Someone who un- 
derstands programming must ex- 
plain the concepts. — tana, summers 

Rainy Day Fun 

HARDWAi^E REQUIREMENTS; Reviewed 
on C 64. Also for Apple. 
manufacturer: thorn EMI Comput- 
er Software Inc. 
PRICE: S40 
MANUFACTURER-S suggested AGE: 5-9 

A classic toy chest on a disk! Lift the 
lid to find dot-to-dot puzzles that 
never wear out, Pin-the-Tail-on-the- 
Donkey tails that don"t get lost, and 
sliding puzzles with tiles that never 
crack. 

Better yet. there are seven more 
activities. The menus consist of col- 
ored icons that even preschoolers 
understand, and the print -out option 
(available for most of the games) 
adds to the fun. 

Five activities let children combine 
freehand art with ready-made im- 
ages. The coloring book has 50 pic- 
tures, four "crayon" widths, and sev- 
en colors (five on Apple). If more 
than one child wants to color the 
same picture, there's no need to 
squabble — print out copies and let 




them color with real crayons. Make 
masks on-screen, then add extra fun 
by printing the mask and wearing 
the result. 

Among other activities, you can 
select the invisible donkey, guessing 
his location by sound. Pin the Tail 
then becomes harder than it looks! 
Or talk with a grumpy wizard, who 
consults the stars to provide surpris- 
ingly apt responses to children's 
most hilarious questions. There are 
three different sliding puzzles and 
more mazes than we could count. 

Our favorite activity was Paper Air- 
planes. You can follow along as one 
of six different gliders is constructed 
on-screen. Rotate the model for a 3-D 
view in case you get stuck. The fin- 



ished gliders really fly! 

This set of well-constructed games 
appeals to children ages 5 on up. It's 
the software bargain of the year. 
Where else can you buy toys that 
don't wear out for S4 each? 

— ^TAN A. SUMMERS 

Stickybear Town Builder 

HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: Reviewed 

on C 64. Also for 64K Apple. 

MANUFACTURER: Weekly Reader Family 

Software 

PRICE: 830 (C 64): S40 (Apple) 

■MANUFACTURERS SUGGESTED ACE: 6-9 

Playing Town Builder has inspired 
my three kindergarten friends into 
some sophisticated conversation top- 
ics. One such topic is whether to lo- 
cate the airport next to the diner 
("So the pilots can eat . . . ." and 
"Yeah, but the planes will make too 
much noise and scare away all the 
customers.") to suggestions that the 
road to the hospital should not have 
too many turns ("for when the am- 
bulance drivers are in a hurry"). 

Selecting from a menu of build- 
ings, parks, bridges, and other com- 
munity components, children design 
a town. Roads are added automati- 




Watch out for THE ALPINE ENCOUNTER. 

A great new spy thriller starring you. 

Agent 456, you've got tweK'e hours to sa\'e the world — if you can survive 28 
suspects, 93 danger zones and a killer ski run. This colorful graphics and text 
adventure program' pro\'ides enough mvsterv and fun for a whole family of spies. 
Visit your nearest software dealer or call 1-800-638-6460 (in MD, 800-492-0782). 

RANDOM HOUSE 



^ 



<^^/tufar& 



* For Apple III lie. He wiih Mk. Commodan; b4, IB.M PC, PCjr. S: XT. 
*; 1985 E?andom House Inc. All rights re5er\'ed. Criiphics created with Penqutn Sofhvaro's"' Graphic? Magidnn. * 



100 FAMILY COMPUTING 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 37 



o o o o o 



ATTENTION! 

WORD PROCESSOR USERS! 

CONTINUOUS LETTERHEADS 

AND ENVELOPES. 

PRINTED OFFSET FOR LETTER 

QUALITY PRINTERS, 

BOND - RAG - CLASSIC LAID AND 

CLASSIC LINEN PAPERS 

FOR 

CORRESPONDENCE - RESUMES ■ 

THANK-YOU NOTES - FUND RAISING - 

TERM PAPERS etc. 

CHRISTMAS LETTERHEADS AND 

ENVELOPES ALSO AVAILABLE. 

HOME FINANCE! 

PRE-PRINTED CHECKS - ATTRACTIVE 

MULTI-PART • CARBONLESS PAPERS 

REASONABLE QUANTITIES AT 

MINIMUM PRICES. 

WRITE FOR FREE SAMPLES 

AND INFORMATION TO: 

PERSONAL COMPUTER STATIONERY INC. 

P.O. BOX 837 

ROSWELL. GEORGIA 30077-0837 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 31 

V. y 

o o o o o 




cally to connect the various pieces. 
When the design is completed, store 
the town on disk for later explora- 
tion. 

Any of these stored towns can be 
the scene of a visit. Kids can choose 
"Take a Drive" and stop by a num- 
ber of places in town before their gas 
runs out. Another option during a 
visit, called "Find the Keys," intro- 
duces compass directions. Players 
try to find hidden keys using map 
clues at the bottom of the screen. 

I haven't found anything lacking 
in this deceptively simple program. 
Town Builder holds children's atten- 
tion, helps to develop an under- 
standing of spatial relationships, 
and teaches basic map skills. 

Two of my testers complained, 
however. They pointed out that even 
when they had the foresight to de- 
sign a gas station into their town, 
they weren't allowed to refill their 
tanks in "Take a Drive" or "Find the 
Keys"! — mai^lene anne bumgarner 

Temperature Lab 

HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: Reviewed 
on 48 K Apple. Also for C 64. 
MANUFACTURER: Hayden Software 

PRICE: $100 

MANUFACTURER'S SUGGESTED AGE: 1 1 + 

What makes some objects hot and 
others cold? Why does liquid rise in 
a thermometer? What makes fog? 
How do ice cubes cool drinks? Why 
is salt poured on icy roads? 

If you've ever wondered about 
these questions. Temperature Lab, 
part of Hayden's Science Discovery 
Series, provides an extraordinary op- 
portunity to discover the answers by 
performing experiments and observ- 
ing the results, 

temperature Lab contains a com- 
plete laboratory kit: thermometer, 
temperature sensor, computer inter- 
face, disk, and a lengthy user's man- 
ual. The manual raises questions 
about everyday experiences with 
temperature. 'Y'ou proceed, however, 
to formulate hypotheses about why 



temperature acts as it does, to col- 
lect data testing your hypotheses, 
and to interpret the results. The pro- 
gram thus leaches scientific method 
on an adventure of discovery. 

Temperature Lab is not for the 
very young. The package recom- 
mends ages 1 1 plus, but our kids 
felt 13-14 would be closer to the 
mark. The concepts are sophisticat- 
ed, yet even the most complex ideas 
become clear once you experience 
the various scientific processes. 

Be warned, though, that this oth- 
erwise four-star package deserves a 
three-star rating alone on "value for 
money." If you own an Apple II or 11 
plus, you must buy an extra $10 
adapter. Considering Lab's $100 
price tag, it might have been includ- 
ed free. Also. S50 goes toward the 
interface that works with other titles 
in this series — a hefty investment 
unless you plan on buying those 
packages, and only one. Light Lab, 
is currently available, — ^tony morris 



GAMES 

CempetiliQn Karate 

HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: 48K Apple. 

MANUFACTURER: Motivated Software, 

Inc. 

PRICE: S35 

CRITIC'S SUGGESTED AGE: 12 H" 




Here's a first in strategy/arcade gam- 
ing. Competition Karate combines 
the character creation and long- 
range development elements of 
games like Wizardry, with the 
streamlined play systems of pro- 
grams like Archon and Mail Order 
Monsters. 

Unlike more traditional role-play- 
ing games, however, this is a fast- 
paced program with no plot to com- 
plicate matters. 

Begin by choosing a personality 
for each of up to 32 characters per 
team. The computer randomly gives 
each character a fighting profile 
which includes height, weight, 
strength, agility, quickness, stami- 



Davidson is 

% % % a 1 

in Education 



For math, speed reading, spelling and vocabulary, 
Davidson's award winning software outsells ail others. 
Why? Bwause enough people choose to buy the 
educational software that works . 

MATH BLASTER makes it more fun to add, 
subtract multiply, divide, and learn fractions, decimals 
,.,— — ,^ . and percenls. Rrst through sixth 
graders master 600 math facts with 
exciting graphics, animation, sound 
effecls.,,even an arcade game. 
Apple'", Macintosh™, IBM'", 
Commodore 64/128™, Atari™. 49.95. 




S^^ READEB n can quadruple your reading 
spesi and improve your comprehension. Develop 
good reading habits, chart your 
process, and have fun! For high 
school age through adult Apple 
II™, Macintosh™, IBM™, 
Commodore B4/128™. 69.95 



WORD ATTACK lets students ten through adult 
discover the meanings and usages of 675 new words. 
Includes a fun, fast-action arcade 
^j!^5 ' game and add-your-own-words 
"^^ . editor. Apple™. IBM™. Commodore 

^^>: 64/128™. Atari™, 49.95 





SPELL IT teaches ten year olds and older how to 
sp^l a thousand and one of our most commonly 

misspelled words. Vivid graphics, 
^ i I animation, sound effects, a lively 
^-\\\ \ arcade game and add-your-own- 
words editor, too! Apple™. IBM™. 
Commodore 64/128'"', Atari™. 49.95 



Davidson & Associates, Inc, 

800-55fr6141 

(In CalH., 213-5344070) 



Davidson. J^% 

Dmidson & Assocktes, Inc. N E a" 

3135 Kashiwa St / Torrance. CA 90505 

Please send me a FREE COtOR BROCHURE and the name of 
my neatest Davidson Dealer. 

Name 

Address 

City Slate Zip 



Ednctdiaiml So&wme that Warfa 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



na, perception, courage, and arm 
and leg ability. Before every tourna- 
ment, fighters can improve some or 
aJl of their skills by participating in 
"training sessions." 

Each victory or defeat is registered 
in the characters' profiles after tour- 
naments. If you choose to play only 
for practice, though, the profile is 
unaffected. Using either paddles or 
the keyboard, players choose from 
nine moves (six offensive, three de- 
fensive), then exchange blows until a 
player is knocked out, hurt, or out- 
scored. 

Victorious fighters receive points 
for effective hits or defensive moves. 
As they grow in power, the fighters 
advance from white belt up to red 
belt, finally retiring after they have 
beaten their teachers and become 
instructors themselves. 

Competition Karate is a must for 
serious gamers ages 12 on up. And, 
like Mail Order Monsters, it's the 
start of a new trend in strategy/ar- 
cade gaming. 

Crusade in iurope 

HARDWAJiE REQUIREMENTS; Reviewed 
on 48 K Atari. Also for C 64: 48K Ap- 
ple; 128K IBM PC/PCjr. 
MANUFACTURER: MlcroProse Software 
PRICE: S40 

CRITIC'S SUGGESTED AGE: 12 + 




Crusade in Europe is a simplified 
wargame for one to two players at all 
experience levels. Choose from a 
number of short scenarios or tackle 
the campaign game (fighting for the 
Allies or delending Europe) from the 
Normandy invasion through the Bat- 
tle of the Bulge. 

Like MicroProse's earlier NATO 
Commander, the joystick-controlled 
play system allows quick movement 
and order-giving in the strategy and 
tactics field. And although the game 
is played in accelerated real time, 
(with the clock constantly running), 
players can stop it temporarily. 

First-rate documentation includes 
easy-to-follow instructions, strategy 
tips, historical notes, and lots of il- 



lustrations evoking the spirit and 
times of World War II. 

While the game is enjoyable and 
fast-paced, the fun is hampered by 
weaknesses in the play system's 
combat resolution and in the uses of 
air power. Beginners won't care, but 
advanced players might, especially 
those used to the accepted formats 
of Strategic Simulations and Avalon 
Hill games. If you don't want to 
spend days on one game, and don't 
mind losing some details intrinsic to 
more complex systems, this one is 
recommended. For ages 12 on up. 

Golf's Best 

HARDWAKE REQUIREMENTS: IBM PC/ 

PCjr: 64K Apple. 
MANUFACTURER: 1 Step Software 
PRICE: S50 

CRITIC'S SUGGESTED AGE: 1 + 

The proliferation of golf games has 
reached the point where nearly a 
half-dozen exist. Mathematical prob- 
ability theories guide such games, 
making them perfect material for 
number-crunching. As further re- 
finements occur, their ability to 
teach grows also. Of the ones we've 
tested. Golfs Best offers the most 
impressive teaching potential, even 
if the graphics aren't the best. 

The secret of Golfs Best lies in its 
power to show players where each 
planned shot will land. This prede- 
termination, while only approxi- 
mate, is a great addition, because it 
allows learning while playing — the 
key to success. 

One to four persons can play, but 
beginners may want to use all four 
golfers at once. That way, you ab- 
sorb the play system faster by seeing 




how to modify each shot. Have one 
golfer consistently hit long shots, 
another short ones. Let the third ex- 
periment with the hook: let the last 
learn the potential of the slice. Then, 
when you've gotten the system 
down, revert to single play. 

Not just a teaching tool. Golfs 
Best has an excellent control system 
for all aspects of play. As in the real 



game, you choose a club for each 
shot, determine how hard and at 
what angle the ball should be hit, 
then swing away. The putting 
greens indicate the direction of a 
roll, so even slight variations can be 
taken into consideration. Not for ar- 
cade aficionados who want lots of 
action, this is a thinking game for 
sports enthusiasts and serious 
gamers age 10 and over, 

Galo 

HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: Reviewed 

on 128K Apple. Also for Apple lie; 

128K IBM PC/PCjr: Macintosh, 

MANUFACTURER: Spectrum HoloByte, 

Inc. 

PRICE: S40 (Apple: IBM); S50 (Mac) 

CRITIC'S SUGGESTED AGE: 12 + 




In this most sophisticated subma- 
rine simulation to date, players be- 
come World War II American subma- 
rine crews, tracking and sinking 
Japanese ships in the Pacific The- 
ater. Cruising across vast oceans, 
competitors control every aspect of 
the sub's operations — from course, 
speed, and depth, to opening and 
closing torpedo bay doors. 

Top-quality graphics are a big plus 
in Gato's realistic play system. Piay- 
testers took turns as captain and 
crew and found their own methods 
for locating, stalking, and attacking 
enemy ships. 1 borrowed my method 
from the Clark Gable/Burt Lancaster 
movie. Run Silent, Run Deep, in 
which the tricky bow shot (firing 
head-on at a destroyer just as it's 
about to pass over you) proved most 
effective. 

Gato also adds several features not 
found in previous sub simulations, 
such as Siibrnarine Commander. 
Look for continuous play, a perma- 
nent log of player actions, rescue 
missions, quick movement options 
that thrust players into action with- 
out having to plot long ocean voy- 
ages, and a wider variety of visual 
aids to help coordinate action. A 
winner all the way! Suitable for ages 
12 on up. 

— REVIEWS BY JAMES DEI-SON 



102 FAMILY COMPUTING 



i^ 



m 



iS 



^«* 



The Holiday Gift Guide contains 
many interesting gift ideas for 
you and your families to enjoy. 
Look here again in the December 
issue of Family Computing. 



SMARTCOOK 

Ri'Cipc packages for mifrmvave & 

con\'crvtioiial cooklni; 

'SMARTCOOK pkijcs ' Si4.50 o. 

■LADY PENELOPE - Ihc lilK'Sl oi 

fiourmei dining - S29.50 ca. 

■TOUR TICKET TO THE KITCHEN (for 

ihe younger chcfl - S29.50 ca. 

■my VERY OWN RECIPES -Savc vour 

own favorite recipes ■ S29-50 ta, 

Most computer systems supported, 

(Apple. IBM. Commodore. Kaypro, 

Tandy. Zenith. Compaq. Atari) 

Master/Visa accepted. 

LE COM 

P.O. Bo.\ 346 

Winfield, 11. 60190 

(3121682-0650 

Shipping & Handling -SI. 50 

Prim big. dramatic banners with PRINTASTIC 
Powerful editor prints precise labels, superb 
documents, everj'thing. In 4 typefaces! 
Personalize your mass-mallinjjs. only 819.95. 

To celebrate. CHECKBOOK CONTROLLER* is now 838 
Sec pg. 77 June issue or write for details. 
• lor Apple & IBM •• also COMMODORE 
B'lTES OF UHIZDOM 6232 Lake Arrowhead Dr. 
San Diego. CA. 92119 (CA res. add 6% tax) 

SOFTWARE FOR IBM, APPLE & ATARI 

All tulcs30% off list. Contact: 

SOUTHERN SOFTWARE, 1879 {{nffner Rd.. 

Birtningham. AL .15210 (2051 956-0986 



COMMODORE 64 
SOFTWARE-OF-THE-MONTH CLUB 

Inquiries Write. P.O. Box 12fi723. 
Cincinnali, OH 15212 



AT LAST! Infroducing . . . 

"An ArtiQxing Heyt Program to holp YOU 
*Plan & prepare Home-Cooked Meala 
*Do your Grocery Shopping 
*Run your Office or Den 
•Help your Kids with School" 

SuperShepperiHonieerganixer "It has helped 

mc tremendously. Its perfect for me"— F.L,, 
Calif "Verj- easy to use"— J.S.. New Jersey. 
Satisfaction Guaranteed. Shipped in 24 hrs, 
All Apple Hs. ScndS79.95-S3S/H, C64«ask 
for Resen'atioii Bonanza Package. Orders & Reser- 
vations toll-free l>aoo-83S-aa46 em. 134 
7 das-s (KS:8(X)-362-24211 Or nrite: Green Mountain 
Marketing. tXpt. 212. Bo,\ 261067. Denver. CO 80226 

CHRISTMAS & GIFT STATIONERY 

Quality Christmas and all-occasion 

continuous-feed slationen'. 

FREE brocfture & samples. 

Write or call mfg: 

Wliard Cempuler Ac«esierias Inc. 

2423 W. Devonshire Ave, ■ Dcpi, FA 

Phoenix, AZ 85015 

16021285-1355 

Dealer Inquiries welcome. 

BLACK BELT & PROTON OUEST 
EARTHWARE COMPUTER SERVICES 

P.O. \i(K 30039. Eucene OR 97403 
Free catalog (503) 344.33B3 

TJ DISCOUNT DISK-HarAiare. aU computers. 
10 I'Dsk IV case, S15. Send SI for cat 181 refl. 
P.O. Box 1324. Sterling Hts. Ml 48311-132-1 

TROOP MASTER-Manage Your Scout Troop. 
Apple 11 plus, lie. lie. Monarch: 402- 331-7264. 



UNIQUE 

PERSONALIZED 
SOFTWARE GIFT 

A Christmas Adventure 

It is Christmas eve. Santa Cla us is missing! Tt^e 
player is called upon (by namell to solve Itie 
mystery of Santa's disappearance. But ttiafs 
just part of tt^e fun. . . A Cfirist mas Adventure 
is much more Ihan an adventure game— it's a 
total holiday entertainment package. With its 
witty text, superb graphics, wry humor, fun and 
surprises, it's the perfect gift for micro-users of 
all ages. Best of all, YOU CAN CUSTOMIZE IT 
so that PERSONAL REFERENCES TO THE 
RECIPIENT, AND YOUR OWN GREETING 
IMESSAGE TO HIM OR HER WILL APPEAR 
RIGHT IN THE PROGRAMI 
S24.95 1+ S3.00 sh/Mgl. Demo Disk S5.00 ppd. 
Avail, on disk for C-64 and Apple II lamily(64K) 
CALL TOLL-FREE (ORDERS ONLY) 
1-S00-821-5226 
ask for extension 432 

Send mail-orders or requests for luther info to 

BltCards Inc. 
30 W. Service Rd., Box 63t Champlain NY 1 291 9 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 52 



Wi'RE NOT MACHINE-SPECIFIC 
WE'RE A UNIQUE USERS' CROUP 

SASE to; CME lodav for full details 

P.O. Box 399. Easllake. CO 80614 

TABLETS. Computer-Word Proc. Projects. 3,'SIO 

-rSl pli MD res. +5% ta.x. Many more. New cat. 

Special Events Unltd.. Box 334. Gaith. MD 20877 

ATARI ST OWNERS Life Organizer & Enter- 
tainment Jackpot, Write: DM 94 Macalester 
Bay Winnipeg, Manitoba. E^T 2X5. Canada 



V 

v> 



^^^^ 



Apple Writer lAll verslotisl S9,95, 

File,/Reporl'GraphAVrlte (Apple) S12.95. 

The Dot Matri.\ Printer S12.95. 

Learn basic & atlvanced procedures. Proven 
guides, the preferred te.xt for school'home. 
Send Check IVisa'MCl ^ S2shlp. (3011 995-1 166. 
Minuteware. P.O. Bo.\ 2392. Columbia. MD 21045. 

THE HACKER'S GUIDE TO ADAM. $12.95 

63 pages of tech info. Use sound, sprites, 
make tapes, copy cartridges, more. Educational. 
P.Hinkle. 117 Northvlew Rd„ Ithaca, m 14850 

WORDSTAR & MAILMERGE InstrtictlonalReference 
Manual IN A N'LT SHELL. Fail, easy w/special tricks 
shortcuts, S8 CAPES. Bx 9052. Seo'ttsdale. AZ 85251 

1st ADAM— onlv publication. S126 issues. Sage 
Enterprises. Rt. 2. Bo.t 21 1. Russelhille. MO 65074 



NOVEMBER 1985 103 




ADAM 



ACCESS 



DIRECT ACCESS is a unique advertising section. Created for 
mail-order advertisers, it serves as the shopping guide for the 
more than 375,000 computer using households reached by 
FAMILY COMPUTING. Each month the new^est and best in 
computer related products and novelties can be found in 
DIRECT ACCESS. 




Hunt and Peck is fine 

for chickens but 

Faslype' is the 

fun and easy way to 

learn touch 

typing on: ibmPC. 

TANDY 1000 TRS-80 MODEL III/4 

"The program is well written and lunc- 
lions well without problems the typ- 
ing instructions have been done by 
someone who knows their way around 
the teaching profession ,rf you want to 
learn to type, increase your typing ability 
or cure a lifetime of bad habits. 
FasType is an excellent way to go " 
Lon Andrews, Computer Shopper, July 'BS 

Educators: Special Nelworl< Version Available! 

$39.95/drsk plus $1 .50 shipping. 

AZ residents add 5%. Specify computer. 



Press A Software 
Box 364 F 
Jerome, AZ 86331 
(602)634.2688 




CIRCLE READER SERVICE 32 



l}ie ADAM'S APPLE International 
Users' Sroup has becoae the 
biggest news since ADAH. Vou can 
join other ADAM users in 
receiving our Bi-Bonthiy 
Newsletter, Progrdi Library 
(Over 210 prgs.), Discount hw/sw, 
The ADAH Hotline, and our BBS. 
Price:tl0.00 (U.S.) 

*H.OO (Foreign)U.S. Funds) 
Phone:216-291-2B65 'Charles Kolin' 
S end check or aiJtiey order to; 
ADAM'S APPLE 
4835 Edsal Rd. 

Cleveland, ahio 44124-2305 

For additional inforiation and a 
catalog, send a self addressed 
staiped envelope. 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 1 



EBU -add commands 10 BASIC to landie COLOR. RE-NUMBER 

HEX-CONVERSION i MUSIC Auto-loadims 

DIASLO - Strategy and joystick control ot machine level 

giapliics sprites and scund Ajio-toading 

BO^iANZA IBSmaitBASlCpioaiams by Maitin Consulting 

CHARTS & GRAPHS - pie. t)ai line 4 step graptis oi youi 

numoers Bar giaptlS can tw pnnled on your pnntei 



TI 99/4A 



TYPWRITEfl - word processing wrthou! iriemary expansion 

Any prinler V^naOle prni styles 

N AM E -IT - Mail 1rsl/catat)ase Manage S pnnl tatwis, lists, files 

MASTER DISK FILE - auto filing ot disk Drogram names 

Auio-updaies list ii ctiarges art made 

SCREEN DUMP - Dixel lor Dixel dump of screen !oanfi-<}or 

addressaDle prmler 

GAMES - giaphiics & sound, rrrost leqjire joysticHs 

All Tl soltwate requiies use of the Extended BASIC module 

Write or call for dl«tAll*d 1ffl« catalog. 

- VISA A MASTERCAflD ACCEPTED - 

All pro0rami come an casBttts or diskettQ madia. 

Sattstaciion guaranietd c your purchasp pnce refur^ded 



EXTENDED SOFTWARE COMPANY 

11987 CEDARC REEK DR. .CINCrNNATI. OH 45Z40 

(513)825-6645 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 18 



3M Diskettes 
Lifetime Warranty 



TIRED OF WAITIN'G 
FOR SERVICE AND PRICE? 

9 out of 10 SURVEYED 
DISK BUYERS PREFERRED 

NORTH HILLS 

#1 IN SERVICE AND PRICE 

1-800-328-3472 

Formatted and hard sectored disks 
in stock-Dealer inquiries invited, 

COD, VISA, MASTERCARD 
AH orders shipped within 24 hrs. 



A 



-A4 



M 



NORTH HILLS CORP. 
INTERNATIONAL 

3564 Rolling View Dr. 

White Bear Lake, MN. 5S110 

Mil. call collect— 612-770-0485 




STOP 
SEARCHING 



wjh*. 



_Z cammodtDrea^J^^ 



OUR 
PRICE 

»3S 



Flight Simulator II 50 

Paperclip 90 '70 

Spinnaker (call-lg. selection) 21up »l3up 

||cf>pta 

The Print Shop 50 

The Newsroom 50 

Mind Prober 50 
IBM PC:/r- 



Math Blaster by Davidson 50 
NEW! The Nev»/sroom 50 

pfs: File, Write, or Plan 40 

FREE CATALOG 

SEE READER SERVICE CARD 

Software Central (216) 492-9163 

4037 Hills & Dales, Canton. Ohio 44708 



'32 
•33 
=33 

'32 
'33 
>B9 



FBEE UPS SHIPPING 



We Rebate $1 . On Phone Ortjers 



^ 



ADAM 



Data 

Disks 

Rtbbo 

Daisy 

Cover 

Label 

PRINT 

TRACT 

fTUT. 

Ijii 

PACKC 
pgi/ER 
DIA3L 
HACKE 
Tn + Ea 
i sof 
Spri t 
Smart 
tocat 
FastF 
sorts 
a com 
EBU 



PackTAd 
(blank 
n Cart, 
Hheel- 
(3) K 
S T/F-F 
ER STAtI 
flR FEED 

i_tems_i 
OPT-Bac 

O-dind 
R'S GU! 

tware p 
e E d i 1 
SPtUER 
fs miss 
ILER 
"TTook 
pi ete D 
SmartD 



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amF 

SS. 

(Ad 
Ital 
oy ,C 
/F ( 
D - 

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n_th 
kup , 
ight 
clial 
OE_T 
erna 
roar 
r,Fo 
-El 
pell 
Gene 
s-up 
ata 
asic 



tends basic, 

SiH-S-J-BOCH 
us $ ' s linly 
VISA/MASTER 
We stock what we 



renu 

II : 

51 
Ch 



- SPECT 
T7T3.9 5 
DO) 

in |) r i n 
i c , S c r i 
PU.Prin 
Address 
Front 
f anfol d 
Uane'yo 
ls__Ad 
SnartBA 
/just 
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0_ADAM 
1 wo Fit i 
ans . Ca 
nt edi t 
ec troni 
ed word 
rate na 
i n sec 
base sy 

Data 
iTib e r s 1 s 

w.rUth 

Rhode 

erry Hi 

(609) 

lilT^ 



RAVI DED 

- 10/S 
ID/S 
ter) 
pt-Adam 
ter •' $ 
) 1000/ 
U/OFF t 

g^ajierf 
ur coup 
L5_f or 
SIC etc 
u ta/cen 
raphicE 
- 1 ncl ud 
n g s h a r 
rtr i dge 
or, etc5 
c diet! 
s. etcS 
11 lists 
onds .Tti 
stem. $ 
or Disk 
o unds % 
CO. Dep 

Island 
11 , IIJ 

667-25 
as t del 



37.50 
19.95 
$5.50 
$5.5U 
18.95 
$5.00 
22.95 
7?,9S 
u ter 
ADAIJ 
29.50 
24.95 
24.95 
ed DP 
dware 
Copy 
17.95 
onary 
39.95 
,etc . 
is is 
24.95 
Ex- 

t.F9 5 

Ave . 

08002 

26 

i very 



Software That Works 
For Generations 

6 Types of Charts and Sheets 

Indices 

User Fields 

Notes, Footnotes and Sources 

No Limits 

Adapts to Your Hardware 

Comprehensive 

Easy to Use 

And Much, Much More 



Send (or brochure 
and san^plf printouts. 
Fiimily ilools in- 
cludes detailed 
manuajand2full 
diskcncs of pro- 
grams for your 
.\pple [I. IBM 
PC. Comniodore 
61 and CP/M.* 



Other genci!og>' soft- 
ware 0I5O available. 



# 

Fani% 
Roots 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 39 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 25 



QUINSEPT^, INC. 
P.O. Bon 216, Lexington, MA 02173 / (017) 641-2930 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 35 



ROSETTA 
STONE 




The ancient floseita Stone 
of Egypt inspired Rosetta 
Stone, the game. Observation 
ot the patterns between the three languages on 
the Roselia Stone enaliled Jean Francois Cham- 
pollion to crack tlie enigmas o1 the ancient hiero- 
glyphics Roselta Stone, the game, challenges 
you to master its puzzles in a similar way. 
The nine levels ot Hoseiia Stone will provide 
months ot challenge for the entire family (clever 
10 year olds through determined adults). Can 
YOU become master ol the Rosetta Stone' [For 
Apple2'(MK). 2e.2cl 

3Q-0fty IMonty Back Guaranton. 
S39,95 (Caiifornia fesidents add 6%) Shipping 
and handling is included. Master CareJ and VISA 
welcome. 

Hunt'i Sollware Worki 

3653 Ctiarles Street 

San Diego. OA 92106 

(BOO) 624-9497 (Except California) 

(6191 224-6774 {Within Californisl 

Hunt'* Software, WORKSI 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 23 




•EXPERIENCE th« world o-f 
robotics with thijE MI3VIT 
programmabld robot kit - 
« challttnging ar>d rvMjtrding 
■ Hp«rl«ric« for young paoplB 
and adultm allk>. 

•DEIiONSTRflTE your roboticm 
knoHledge to your -family «nd 
fritfr^dm Mithi your «aB*mbl*d 
MEMOCQN CRAWLER. 

#76. 95 Po«tp»id 

C»llf. R«». filM »*-B7 G*l*> Tan 
Swna 1" thim Md wltli your ordm- •™j 
racaly* ■ 'S credit toward* futur* 
purcha»«» trom our catalog 
plaBX ■•rid ct>«i:fc or •on«y tsnimf 

2263 MESTWOOD BLVD, F-615 
LDS ftNGELES, Cfl <?OOt4 
S«r>d for FREE catnloq sf ath«- ROBaXB, 
■ ci»rtc« kit" *r^ ath«r *ln« productB. 
Satl»f*ction (iu»r«nt»*d 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 14 



maxell disks 

LIFETIME WARRANTY 



TIRED OF WAITING 
FOR SERVICE AND PRICE? 

9 out of 10 SURVEYED 
DISK BUYERS PREFERRED 

NORTH HILLS 

#1 IN SERVICE AND PRICE 

1-800-328-3472 

Formatted and hard sectored disks 
in stock-Dealer inquiries invited. 

COD, VISA, MASTERCARD 
All orders shipped within 24 hrs. 



hM 



N{ 



NORTH HILLS CORP. 
INTERNATIONAL 

3564 Rolling View Dr. 

Whi'e Bear Lake, MN. 55110 

MN- call collect-612-770-0485 



ATTENTION! 
Adam Users 

The International Adam Users' 
Group continues to grow. (6000 +) 



The Augment Nevt^sletter 
continues to offer the latest infor- 
mation regarding new Adam 
software and hardware. 

The AUG library of public domain 
software is now available and is 
growing. (100 + programs) 

For more information and mem- 
bership application write to: 

ADAM USERS' 
GROUP 

BOX P-1 
LYNBROOK, N.Y. 11563 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 2 



NOW USE BOTH SIDES 

OF YOUR DISKETTE 

5)^DISKEnE 

HOLE 

PUNCH 



WITH HOLE GUIDE 




and EDGE GUIDE 



PUNCH OUT IS ALWAYS IN THE RIGHT POSITION 

Available lor IMMEDIATE Shipment 

only $tO.OO add «2.00 shipping 

CHECK OR tvlONEY ORDER 



FOR OTKER THAN APPLE AND APPLE LOOX-A-LIKES- 
WE HAVE A TEMPLATE TO POSIIION A REGULAR 
ROUND HOLE PUNCH FOR THE READ EHABLE HOLE 
HEAR THE CENTER 

COST- 4 for $200 

N.P.S. Inc. (^ 

Dapl. F.C. (7i5]ie4-60ic 

IIMBOIWOCSD JiruiiN10«N M 190<£ -.-•."..- 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 29 



nil mflRYmflC industries inc. 

800-231-3680 

Radio Shack TRS-80's' 
Epson Printers 

People you Trust to give you the very best! 



• Lowest 
Discount 
Prices 

• Reliable 
Service 

• Quality 
Products 



"World's largest Independent 
aiilhorJ7.ct] Tandv Dealer." 
22511 Katv FWY . Katv (Ho'ustonl Texas 77450 
(7131 J920747 Telex 77aiJ2 







CIRCLE READER SERVICE 26 



MAIL 

ORDER 

MADE 



Ordering inercliaiidise by mail can be a conve- 
nient way to save time, energy, and even mon- 
ey. It Is the best way to buy products that tan- 
not be found locally. We encourage mail-order 
buying. We suggest that you read the following 
10 ensure that you have a successful experi- 
ence. 

BEFORE YOU DUTt 

• Call the company. If possible. Check years in 
business. Ask for references. Are they listed in 
the phone book? Ask for a contact name to use 
in future dealings. 

• Read the product description. Make sure the 
product offered is what you want, if possible, 
Investigate the sellers claim. Find oui ij the 
product will do icha! the ad says. Is consum- 
er support offered if you have trouble gelling 
the product to function properly? 

• Note the promised deliver)' or shipment 
time. The seller must ship your order when 
promised. If no specific time is promised. Ihe 
seller must ship no later than 30 days q/ier 
receiutng your order. 

• Find out the merchant's return policy. Does 
ihe company offer guarantees? If it's a third- 
party product, is the manufacturer's warrantee 
valid? 

PLACE THE ORDER: 

• Send complete order information as in- 
structed. Incomplete information may delay 
your order. The 30-day period does not begin 
until the seller receives a properly completed 
form. 

• Keep a copy of your order and Ihe original 
advertisement. 

• Make a note of the merchant's name, ad- 
dress, and the date of your order. (If you place 
your order by telephone, note time and date of 
your conversation and Ifie name oj the person 
with whom you speak.] 

• Keep a record of your payment (a canceled 
check or charge-card statement). 

IF YOU HAVE A PROBLEM: 

• Contact the company. If contact is made by 
phone, keep a record of the time and date of 
call and the name of person with whom you 
speak. Foliou.'-up in uirflfng. describing ihe 
problem. Include copies of the order and your 
payment records; outline any solution reached 
during any previous phone calls. 

IF YOU CANNOT RESOLVE YOUR 
PROBLEM, YOU CAN: 

• Call your local or state constimer-protectlon 
office. 

• Call the local or state consumer-protection 
oflice located nearest the company. 

• Call your locai Postmaster. Ask for the name 
and address of the appropriate postal Irispec- 
tor-in-Charge. This is a federal authority who 
may be able to resolve such disputes. 

• If merchandise was paid for by credit card, 
contact credit-card company providing full in- 
formation about your problem. Your credit-card 
company may be able to resolve your com- 
plaint. 

• Contact the book, magazine, or newspaper 
publisher that carried, or is currently carr)-ing, 
the advertisement. Publishers can be helpful in 
resolving complaints. 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON "SHOPPII^G BY 

MAIL." WRITE THE FEDERAL TRADE COM- 
MISSION'. Pennsylvania Ave. and Sixth St. 
.\'.W.. Washington. D.C. 20580 



FAMii-vroMJ'LTiNG cannol be responsi- 
ble for the accuracy of description, 
but will aitempi to screen out mls- 
leadliiH luitl/or Incorrect state- 
ments. 

CIve Teur Product er Service a 

BeesI with Classified 

ixpoaurA 

Cosl-t*rrecllvcIy rt'ach the more llian 
1 million FAMi[,v coMi'tniNO 
readers who want Information on 
compLitln^ and computer-rclalcd 
products. 

Active, aware users of: Apples. Alaris. 
Colecos. Commodores. Prankllns. 
IBMs. TIs. Tlmcx SInclalrs. TRSs. 
etc.. whci have an ongoing Interesl in 
system upgrade, adding pcrlpbcrals. 
writing programs, acquiring soft- 
ware. Joining data bases, bulletin 
boarding, and accessing you. 
Connect now by placing a classified 
ad for your product or sen'lcc In 

F^AMILVCOMrUTING. 

CATICORIISl 

■ANNOlJKCKMtCNTS 
f300KSMANUALS ' 
BUSINESS OPTORTUNITIES 
COMPUTER REPAIR 
FOR FREE.TO SWAP 
HARDWARE 
MISCELLANEOUS 
NOVELTIES 
SMALL BUSINESSES 
SOFTWARE 
TELECOMPUTING 
USED COMPUTER&SOFTWARE 
USERS' CROUPS 

RATES) 

Cost per line per Issue: 
In 1 Issue; SI 8.95 

In 3 consecutive Issues: SIS. 95 

In 6 consecutive Issues: S14.50 

In 12 consecutive Issues: 613.60 

34 characters per line. Including 
spaces and punctuation 
25 characters per line, including 
spaces and punctuation, in all caps 
or boldface 

&I5 additional for all/any boldface 
or Italic lettering 
25% additional for toned back- 
ground 

'Announcements; 2 line minimum. 
S13.60 per line 

TO PLACI TOUR ADi 

• Print or type your copy 

• Determine nvnnbcr of lines 

• Decide fretjuency 

• Send ad with check or M.O. to 

FAMil.V COMI'lJTiNO 

730 Broadway 

New York. XT 10003 

Attn: Ciassilicd 
Or call us at 12121 505-3587 and we 
will help you write an ad with real 
FA.MILY pulling power. 
AH P.O. Bo.\.Mall Order insertions 
must submit PHONE NUMBER for 
our records 

Ads received by the 20th of the 
month will appear in the issue ap- 
proximately two months following re- 
ceipt of llle ad. 

Home is 

where the computer is. 

Reach your target market 

(directly. Advertise in 

DIRECT ACCESS. 

To Place Your Aid in 

DIRECT ACCESS 
Call (212) 505-3636 
FAMILY COMPUTING 

730 Broadway 
New York, NY 10003 



CLASSIFIED 

Give Teur Product er Service a Beest 
with Classified Exposure 



AWNeUMCEMEMTS 

CMI than ks& welcomes I is new nicmbcre 
Col. Quinn G. Smith. Burke A. Rled. 
James R. Franklin. Allen Kcltner. 
John F. Busby II. Damasus O'Relily. 
Richard H. Bordncr. David Kennedy. 
Joel Dobstetn. Jericho John son. 
Lei 375.000 families see vour 
ANNOUNCEMENT In this' section of 
FAMILY COMPUHNO classified! 
Call 12121 505-3587 

BOOKS/MANUALS 

THE HACKER'S GUiM TO ADAM 

has It all. 18 prograins: Ia|)c copy, 
carfrldge'Capy, disassembler. 
Explains machine language, mem-map. 
BASIC, OS. AdamNet, bus pins, & more. 
S12.95. book & tape. 817.95, P. Hinkle. 
117.'<Qrihvlevv Rd.. Ithaca. N"Y 14850 

EXPAKDABLE COMPUTER NEWS 
1st ADAM-only publication. S12; 
6 Issues. Sage Enterprises. Rt. 2. 
Bo\ 2t 1. Russcllvillc. MO 6507-1 

•AOAM.RESOURCE.DIRICTORY* 

175- pgsl S13.95or SASE for Info. 
P.O. Bo.'i 90, Seelpllle. IN 47878 

BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 

SH)-S360 WEEKLY AND UP, 
MAILING CIRCUlj\RS! NO Quotas. 
Sincerely Inlcrested, Rush stamped 
envelope to: NATIONAL DIVISION. 
Box 20728-FCl 1 . San Diego. CA 92 1 20. 



IT'S EASY TO lARN EXTRA $'> 
Turn your ld«a( into a profitable 
business via computer; Act new for 
details. Send SASE to: J. LOWMASTIR, 

34 Cunts Ave. . Q 1 5 Marlboro. MA 1 752 



PERSONAL COMPUTER OWNERS 
CAN EARN $1,000 TO $3,000 

MONTHLY SELLING SIMPLE SERVICES 
PERFORJiED BY THEIR COMPLTER. WORK 
AT HOME - IN SPARE TIME. GET FREE 
LISTOF lOOBESTSERVlCESTOOFFER. 
WRITE: C.I.L.C.K., P.O. BOX 60369, 
SAN DIEGO, CA 92106-8369. 

SOFTWARE AUTHORS! Unique, original 
IBM programs wanted. Send descrtp to 

SOFTQUAL, Box 256, 
219 Isl Ave. N, Seattle. WA 08109 

f OR f REE/TO SWAP~ 

FREE TI-99.'4A SOFFWAKE 
Write for details: Alpha Co. 
162 Chapel Dr.. ChurchvUle. PA 1B966 

" ATTENTION RS COCO OWNERS • 
FREE 24 -page CoCo catalog! 1 1 
CoCoN'uts.BQx21272.Woodha\en.M' i 1421 
TI-99'4A Huge inventory of Hardware. 
Software. & accessories. Free Catalog. 
Competition Computer. 2629 W. National. 
Milwaukee. Wl 53204; I80O1 662-9253 

HARDWARE 

ATTENTION ADAM OWNERS! WescU HW/ 
SW at unbeatable prices. Now In slock: 
modems anddlskdrtvi-s. Cat. 25« VIsa/MC 
THE ADAM DEPOT, 419 RIdgway Ave., 
Johnsonburg, PA I5B45: I814I 965-2487 

SUPER DISCOUNT CATALOG 
Hardware, software, accessories. & 
tnucli more! Send SI to Universal Compuler, 
Bo.\ 26623. Indianapolis. IN 46226 

Wl HAVE THI COMMODORE 13BT 

We also sell most sohware at S3 
over cost! HOME VIDEO, Bo.<( 4068. 
Bloomlngton. IL 6 1 70 1; (3091 827-7567 



Discount Hardware/Software TI-99/4A 

Sundlsk Software. Bx 1690. Wanen, Mi 

48090 TIBDS: I3I3I 751-1 119 

ADAM Discount hardware & software. 
Send stamped, addressed envelope 
for FREE flyer. DATA BACKUP' 

Bo.\ 335. lona. ID 83427 

AppleWorks S199. Apple lie S795. Duo- 
disk S4 73, & more' S<'nd for ca i . 3A. IXIA. 
445 N. Pine. Rcedsburg. WI 53959 

MSCeUNTHAROWARkai SOFTWARE 

Apple. Commodore. TI-99.Atari, IBM PC 
30% below retail. TI cxt.-BASlC-S6S. 
Gemini SG I0-S229, Panasonic 1 090* 1 89, 
Printer interface: TI-859, Atarl-S45, 
Indus disk drive: Atarl-S209, C 64-S239, 
Add 3% s*i. Over I.OOO software titles. 
SendSl for cat. Specifv computer. 
MULTI VIDEO SKRVICIS,Bo\246. 
E. Amherst. KY 1 405 1 : 1 7 1 6) 688-0469 

HOME CONTROL AND ENERCY 
MANACEMENT WITH C 64/VIC 

Create daily'weekly schedules w:th 
Included software to control up [o 
256 lights and appliances. Works 
with all BSR-t\T>e receiver modules. 
S7I.95. Prescoit. 800 E. NWHwv. #230. 
Palatine, IL 60067: (3121 359-5981 

ADAM Lowcost Voice Synthesizer! 
Send SASE for fast details to: 
AAL. P.O. Box 8006. Laguna Hills, CA 
92654. Specify kit or mnntial. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

"DISKETTES"! 

SS/DD DISKS. Se.50/10 pack. 
OS/OD DISKS. S9.50.'10 pack. 
Add 82 shipping fit handling. 
Backad 100% bv J/D LIMITED. 
P.O. Box 223 - Skokle IL 60076: 
(312) 677-2525 . . . CHK-T>10jVISA/MC 
DUST COVERS 
DusI cevers oi teli-lined vinrl. 
Specify color choice: Blk;Brw/BeIge' 
Tan/mitc. ADAM 3-plecc set. 316. 
ADAM disk, S6, Atari SOOXbSOOXL' 
1050 disk drive, 87.50. AppI* 11*/ 
TI/99/4A recorder or printer. 87.50. 
IBM PC 2-Ptcce set. S14. IBM PC/r 
2-piece set, S12.50. We also carrv- 
covers for C 64. Epson. & manv more! 
SASE for info: J CHECK SOFTWARE 
Add S2sTi, Box 345. Mlllty. AL 3Q55S 
(205) B46-aj60 

BUY DIRECT AND SAVE 

Wa are the answer to any of your 
computer needs. Superior duality 
100% error Iros, iV* dlskc 

Box of 10 SS/DD SI 7. DS'DD $21. 
We offer Lilallme Warranllei on 
ourdlskettes. Diskette Doubter S 1 3. 
Apple compt. Side-xslde drives S 1 99. 
Wo have ribbons monllors'prlnlcrs 
& much more! MEMORY PLUS, Inc. 
Box 5008, Irvine, CA 92716.5008 
Shipping liKluded en all erden 

(T141 786-3617 

COLOR PRINTER RIBBONS 
Brown, Blue, Red, Creen, Purple 
APPLE (dot matrix) - COLECO lADAM) 
COMMODORE 140221 & (S300PI IBM 
(graphics! - EPSON (MX70/eO), (MX80), 

[FX80], 1RX80I. ONLY 88. 50 EACH 

MINIMUM ORDER 2 RIBBONS OF ANY 

COLOR. SENT) CHECK OR MONEY ORDER TO 

PRINCETON OFFICE SUPPLY 

43-IS QUAIL RIDGE DRfVE, 

PLAINSBQRO, NJ 06536 

Printer ribbons for aiiv printer 
DELTA MICRONICS 

Box 10933. Erie. PA 16514 
IS141 435-5667 9-3 p.m. EST 



AML has the sMpplles for youl 

Have you been looking for low-price 

diskettes, ribbons, and paper? 

AML i( the aniwerl 

LIFETIME WARRANTIES 

on KODAK. DYS.A.N. MAXELL, SCOTCH 

^^ERBATIUM & LIBERTY DISKS 

TELEX Software for your C 64 

AML 71-38 Myrtle Ave.. Queens, NY 

1 1383 I7I81 326-1 I 10 Tlx:29 1487 

CALL OR WRITE TODAYI 



SOFTWARE 

FIRST AID CAME 

Challenging & Educational. Learn 
fast, accurate responses to many 
first aid situations. Four game 
levels: learning to time challenge 
Modes. Exciting for the whole ramlly, 
Satisfaction gtiaranteed or refund. 
Disk S39.95 each. Specify C 64 or 
Apple II when ordering. 

SHADOWSOFT 
6966 Han,'cst Rd.. Boulder. CO B0301 

FREE jr SOFTWARE CATALOG 

J'rWARE 1986 CATALOG 

BOX 31417; DAYTON, OH 4S431 

AD.WI! GRAPHICS II SD- art, 
ArtMotion. Macro keys S39 
DESK SET: 3 programs (file, budget- 
calc. mail! S29.95. SHAPEMASTER: 
N1AKE ROCKETS. LITTLE ■crlllcrs" 
animate. S29. Business Graphs 825. 
SI. 50 p&h. ,44 stamps for ADAM cat. 

NICKELODEON GftAPHICS 
5640 W, Brown. Glendalc. AZ 95302 

FUN CHILDREN'S SOFTWARE 
Over 120 low-cost programs for kids. 
TI-99,'4A and C 64. Free brochure. 

KIDware 
Box 9762. Dcpt. F. Moscow. ID 83 843 

Adain Ov%'na-s — Now yoitr Adam can read 
& convert other CP/M disk formats. 
Contact: Sage Enterprises, Rle.2, 
Box 21 1. Russcllville. MO 65074 

TI-99/4A Soflwarel-lardware bargains. 
Hard-to-hnd items. Huge lelecllon. 

Fast ser\-lce. Free catalog. DYNENT 

Box 690. Hicksvillc. Vii' 1 1801 

ADAM Software. SASE for catalog 

ADAMaglc. 1634 N. Thompson Dr. 

Bay Shore. N^' 1 1 706 

US Se-up! Over 1.000 pes. 
famous programs. Apple/IBM PC 
buslness/games/ed/eie. Catalog- 
US SI, RELIA.NT. P.O. Box 
33610. Sheung Wan. Hong Kong. 

FREE CATALOG of TESTED 
EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE for Apple/ 
AlarLC 64,TRS-aO/CoCoTI-99/4AATC.20 
Moses. Bx 11038, HuntsvlUe, AL 35805 
IBM PC &Jr Software. Free list! 
Paradise (Computer Works, R.D, 1, 
Box 273A, Newark Valley. NY 1381 1 

COF^' CLON'E XL for C 64. Duplicate pro- 
tected disks, 99% effective, -30 utllltv, 
S24.95-S2 sh EDUCOMP. 2139 Neu-castie 
Ave.. Cardiff. CA 920O7: (6191 942-3838 

VIDEOTUNES— Compose and play 
music on your ADAM 
FUTUREVISION. P.O. Box 34-FC 
N. Billcrica, MA 01862. Vlsa.'MC 
Send for Free Cotaloa. 1617) 663-8391 
TI.99/4A Software X/BASIC Req. The 
Incomparable DCEB Word Processor 
w/Printer Command Auxlllarj', 28K of 
Word Processlng'Printer-Manipulailon 
power on cuuettol (or diski $39,95, 
DCEB Mail List 2eOO-Crcatc any size 
mail llst-add/dcL/modlfy labels In 
memorj'. Cass-S18 + S2.25 sfh IBM Busi- 
ness Software-Ttie Best for Left. 
Send Ck/MO: DC Software Writeri, 
Box 335651, Northglcnn. CO 80233 
VI»b;mC Order # 1303) 428-7127 

Commodore 64 • Timcx/Sinclair 
Free catalog — specifv computer. 
WMJ DATA SYSTEMS. 4 Bulterny 
Drive. Hauppauge. NY 1 1 788 



106 FAMILY COMPUTINd 



C 64 and IBM-PC SOFTWARE CHEAP!!! 
Send for your catalog of game* 
home manaftcment. business, utility, 
and educational software available, 
and you will also receive a disk- 
utility program listing free, along 
with details on how to make inoney 
at home with vour personal computer. 

PACEWARE. INC. Box 64-A. 

Fompano Beach. FL 33074 

You read about 

KITCHEN PLANNER 

In Nov. 84 FAMILY COMPUTING 

Cover Story 

Now. YOU too can save 5-6 hrs a 
month by creating your 1- to 14.day 
a'UJWCED MENU and SHOPPING LIST in 
less than 5 minutes! Easy to use. 
Compact, store-sized printout. 
Send S29.95 + $1.50 handling. In CA 
add 6.5%. All Apple lis. Sav-Soft 
Products. P.O. Box 24898. San Jose. CA 
95154. yiSA-MC calh (4081 976-1048 

ADAM SOFTWARE. New for business: 
Accls. payablc/Accts. reed. /Payroll. 
Also complex hon^c linance. recipe, 
educ. games. SASE for catalog. STEVE 
JACOBY. Bqx2498. Clearwater. Fl, 335 1 7 
CoCoNut Software forTBS-80 Color 
Computer. Send SI to: Site 9. Box 1. 
R. R. 2. Tofield. Albcna TOE 4J0 
SAVE 38% on Software III 
Davidson's Math Blaster 
Retail-$«.«. 0urprice-$30.9I. Free 
price list. Specifv Apple. IBM. C 64. 
CREATIVE COMPUTER RESOURCES 
Box 728. Grand Haven. .Ml 49417 

ADAM . . . Are you interested in 

playing the stock market direct 

with your ADAM? Send SASE to: 

CHAZE PRODUCTS 

P.O. Box 17. MONSON. MASS. 01057 



ADAM SOFTWARE 

Cop}' Utililv. Home Budget. Games, etc. 
CREAT PRICES. Send 22C stamp for 
catalog to: E a T SOFTWARE, 
80x821242. Dallas. TX 7.'5382-1242 

ADAM SOFTWARI 
DRINTSHOP instantly prints signs, 
greeting cards, announcements, etc, 
CME offers eonlinual support with 
Maner'Botk Cnrantee. 89.95 -I-S2 s^ 
SASE for info to CME, 
P.O. Box 339, Eastlake. CO B0614 

MEDIA MCKS FOR THE ADAM 
CopyCart-^ copies mil pi cart pgms 
to a T/t>. Created media will allow 
pgm selection by #. Easy for kids, 
BACKUP -(- makes image and sglmltpl 
file copies. Auto-fix basic for disk. 
Both ML pgms are fast, self-booting, 
and support any tape/disk drive. 
BU-i- S37/D S40/T. CC ^ 815 DAf 
SASE for info; MMSG, P.O. Box 1112. 

Broomlield. CO 80020-81 12 
UNCLE ERNIES TOOLKIT will BACK UP 
vour ADAM software on disk or tape. 
'scan, DUMP & MODIFY. 30-page 
User's .Manual, S23. disk/$25dp - S2sni. 
Info: SASE to Uncle Ernie's Toelkil, 

P.O. Box 63B2, Akron. OH 44312 

FREE APPLE SOFTWARE 

Over 1.000 F^jblic-Domaln Programs on 
50 diskettes. S5 each, plus SI 
shipping per order. Send SI for 
catalog, refundable with order. 
C & H INTERPaiSES 
Box 29243, ,Mem[iliis. TN 38127 

PARENTS & TEACHERS 

Math/Flash Cards. 720 skill levels. 
Print workshecl.s. AppleC 64. S29.95. 
DL SW, Box 2433. Midland. Ml 4864 1. 

TI-99/4A Software/Best selections. 
"Free catalog" MICRO-BIZ HAWAII 
P.O. Box 1 108. Pearl City. HI 96782 

FEELING ABANDONED? 
Jr./PC/XT/AT 55 PROGRAMS S39.95 
TI-99/4A 125 Programs S39.95. SASE 10 
XMAS. Box 24 18. Woonsocket. Rl 02895 



CLASSIFIED 

Give Your Product or Servico a Boost 
with Classified Exposure 



12 CLASSIC 6 AMES-IBM PC 

Chess. Othello. Star Trek. Yahlxee, 
Blackjack. & mare. Ad«-nture. Strategy, 
Color/Sound. VISA/MC. All 12 onlv 
S24.95. McSeftware, 2055 N. Druid 
Hills Rd. . Ste. 20 1 . AUanta, GA 30329 



WIZZARDZ & WAR LORDZ 
At l.as( — A new challenge! Lead your 
tarty of 6 adventurers thru the depths 
of a 15-lcvcl dungeon in 3D graphics! 
IF YOU DARE . , , 849,95 - S2s'li IN5% lax. 
IBM w. 1 28K. fX)S Dealers inqu ire, SASE. 
RAM-TEKCO-,6752FCo\ingtonCrk.Trl. 
FonWaync. IN46604:(219l4'32-2455 

4 BIO REASONS TO BUT 

Sallware From Soft Source-ll 

I, Top Apple, IliM Programs 

3. Guiiies. educational, biiiall business 

(20-40% off) 

3. 3rd year of personalized service 

4. FREE shipping/brochure!! 

Soft Sourcc-R. Depl, D, 
Box 2931. Jolict. IL 60434 

FHEE PROOIWMS C 64: - 4TI-994/V\nC-20/ 
CoCo/lll/4/MClO'Tlmex. Send stamps! 
Ey.ra. Box 5222CT. San Diego, CA92105 
ATARI SOFTWARE CLOSE-OUT of a major 
company. Each package of 2 disks has 
up to 10 programs worth almost SIOO. 
Now 89 per pack: Arcade Game Pack #1 
or#2i KldsGames # 1 or #2: Educational: 
DataBase:Programm1ngTools#l or #2. 
Word Processor 815. Graphics Design 
Pack S19. Game Designers Pack S19. 
- S2s'h'. Visa-MCchcck.SendSi Catalog 

COMPUTERS MADE SIMPLE 
438 129th PI, N,E,. Belle\-ue, WA 98005 

Back up vour protected IBM disks with 
Copsll PC. Available for Apple & C 64. 
S35'ea. - S3 s'h. RSD. Box 272. 
Bronxvllle. NY 10708 ISASE for infol 

,^D,.\M SOFTWARE' SmartTi'PE. KopyKAT. 
Reed\- L ibrar;'. Each— S25 dp'S2'3 d Isk. 
Send SASE for info.: REIDT SOFTWARE, 
10085 6Qth St.. Alto. Ml 49302 
PRO FOOTBALL ANALYST 
L'iieo\'<T hidden overlays In the bet 
line! Eas\ . reg onlv 5 niiivweek 835 
LOTTO PICKtl) Million &S Jackpots! 
Unlock the wltining combinations for 
vou! Dativ .\iimbers & Win-4 loo! All 
USganies included. Programmable S35 
For IBM & TI.99/4A Free Catalog 
RIDGE, 170 Broadway. #201-FC1 1, 
New York. NY 10038:17181 833-6335 

Do il with your IBM 

I>on'ipa>-;i riieeli;inlctirinece.ssar>'$'» 
Traufaleshaohir-Ono/MtserMe<hank 

A complete ti.scr-fiiendly answer to 
ear problems. Fault traclngby symptom, 
sv.slem. Pay only 849.95. 30-day money- 
back gtiaran lee, Expert/Wore Inc> 
lew, 161hSl,,NewYork. Nil' 10011 

T1.9fl4A5 arcade games, ftill graphics 
on cassclte. Send S5 to MICROTECH 
Kl 2. Box 200. Galllpolis. OH 45631 

SKXiCLE-IBM PC -REVISED BOGGLE VTORD 
CA,ME. .1 SIZES. SCOKING. LARGE LETTERS. 
RULES, REFUND. FREE INFO US S30, BOX 
1869. r.UELPH. ONTARIO. CAN.WA NIH 7A1 

TI-99/4A NEW SOFTWARE 

STATES AND CAPITALS GAME 

Hi-res map of USA. 1 or 2 players. 

Send S12 for cassette, or SI for 

more Info., to: TRINirir SYSTEMS, 

1022 Grandvlew .^ve.. PGH. PA 15237 

FREE IBM i'tibllc-Domaln Software 
with purchase of blank disks. For 
details & ilstlEig of ]jrograms send 
&\SE to V^INDWARD PUBLIC SOFRV,\RE, 
P.O. Box 4630. Kaneohe. HI 96744 



NEW NUCINTOSH SOFTWARE' Blisirifss 
Personal, Free catalog. Write i)LS 
Software. FOB 829. Cllllon. NJ 07015 



FREE C 64 SOFTWARE CATALOG 
PANTHER SOFTWARE. 6608-4 
Wisteria Dr.. Charlotte. NC 28210 

improve your child's \l\th skili-s. 

42 le\t:ls. k-8. add sub mul divtest 
lf.-\!«1sg modeshelp eiwse .-vnswtcks, 

MENU-DRI\'EN'. C 64in.\I, T.1PKDISK DEMO, 
85 APPLIED TO 319,95 PROG, T, MOORE. 
BOX 194. RED0!^DO BE..^CH. CA 90277 
ADAM SOFTWARE & HARDWARE 

Personal Accounlanl by Softsync — 824 
SmarlSPELLER-Electronlcdictionarv' 
iotnles ^ eht^-ks mispelled words, etc. . 8.19 
DataCALC-Eleetroiile spreadsheet .,,324 
FasiFILER-Filc isiaiiitgement -wsiem . . 824 
TRACTOR-FEED ASSEMBLY . , , . S79.95 

Adam Ribbons 85.50 

Dalapacks Preformatted , . S3,50 10.831 
PACKCOPf— Makes backup copies of ADAM 

software. Da la Pack or Disk $29 

TOWERPfdNT— Printing enhanecmmt . . S24 
NASHUA 51.4 SS.'Dn disks 10-paek . . 815 
Shipping 81. .50 USA.S3-50 Canada, 
FREE Catalog— Ei'en'thtng for ADAM. 

alpha>o'ne ltd 

1671 East 16th St,, Suite 146, 
Dept, FC. Brooklyn. NY 1 1229 
Pick Lotto numbers with your 
C 64. Send S8.00 check or money 
order for disk to NUMERICS. P.O. 
Box 892. Bayonnc. NJ 07002-0892 

Super-Priced C 64 Software 

Pro-WYiler, Data base, Education. Music 

Games. Graphics. Finance &. much more! 

All on 1 disk for only $14.95 - SiVh. 

SOFTWORKS INC., 

P.O. Box 03950. Highland Park. .Ml 46230 

COMMODORE 64 & C 136 
HOMEMATE, apo\v-erful graphic data base, 
has address card lilc. home inventory, 
memo pad w/screen display mode. 
Format disk, scan directory, search 
common fields ^ more! Plus 3 graphic 
games: Savage Hunt, Attack Polar 7, 
3 Card Mollv, SEARCHER SOFTWARE, 
Disk 839,95. Box 4901 1. Chicago. IL 

60649-0011: (3121 976-2055 
IBM PC Graphics for engineering, 
science, biz. S35 - FREE flnajice & games 
pgms. DMC-PC. Pox 1547.Keni.WA98032 
10 basic games with graph.'souncl for 
C 64- Send 816.50 in; NmiKE ENT.. 
P.O. Box 189. Comiiiciee Cily. CO 80037 

* * * FREE SOFTWARE * * * 
IBM. COMMODORE, and Cp M comptitcrs. 
For info send stamped envelope to: 
PUBLIC DOMAIN USERS GROUP. 
Box 1442-FC. Orange Park. FL 32067 

After a sticcesslul 198-1 seasoil 
CREETINCWARE' IS BACK 

with sing-along music plus software 
goodies, ideal for Christmas and 
birthdays. We have an excitinil litre 
of attractively-priced software 
gifts for yotir favorite IBM PC user. 
For our FREE catalog, write to 

RO.XBURV RESEARCH INC. 

RD 1. Box 171 A. Ro.xbury. NY 12474 

or call NTS: (6071 326-4070 

Call toll-free 800-DlALROX 

ADAM SOFTWARE 
MULTICART BACKUP 5 carls to disk. 
8 to DP. Shows titles, loads wjstick 
VIEWLOAD Basic HELUO pgm. Shows 
up to 32 pgms. ARFiOW & S-Keys. To 
select, run, load. cat. Ik mor<'! 
810.95 ea or 819.95 for both. CK/Mo 
SASE: PRACTICAL PROGRAMS 
P.O- Box 224, Kalamazoo, Mi. 49005 



T1-99'4A buy one program. 
gel two others Ireel Discounts 
on repeat orders. Adult Games! 
Business. Kids Games and more! 
Free Catalog. MOKCAN SOFTWARE. 
Box 3452. Ann Arbor, Ml 48106 

TELECOWPUTiilG ~ 

NATIONWIDE BULLETIN BOARD 
Phone #s. Send 83.95. Gar.- S. West. 
P.O. BiM 55506. Washington. D.C. 2001 1 



USED COMPUTERS/ 
SOFTWARE 



BUYING OR SELUNG A COMPUTER? 

New or iiseil! Let us do it ior you! 
COMPUTER INTERCHANGE 

"A N,-\T10N'WIDE LISTING SERVICE. " 
JUST CALL MON-SUN 8a.m.-8 p.m. EST 
<aOO) 631<548a (nationwide) 

(800)333-4951 (in N.J.I 

Specify— Buyer or Seller 
P.O. Box 69!"). Springlield, NJ 07081 

WANTED! YOUR COMPUTER 
Inlernoltonnl Computer Resales 

Inleresled In selling or buying a 
preowned computer? We are the 
nalion's largest «i oldest clearing 
hoti.se. 1-800.447-0030. 
In FloriiLi 1.S00-34S.0a3O. 



USER'S GROUPS 

PCfr Owner's FREE CATALOG 
Ind drive at a Super pricel 

Quadram. Raeore. Legac\', 
Join the PC/r group' 

for best product selection & sttpport 

Call the PC/r CROUP today! 
!800] 233-2203. InT.XIBOSl 799-0327 

::i:ii::itADAM OWNERSlusllIliiil 
Get 2 FREE dalapo<kf plus 
our newsleller lor onK- 8 16.95 
Send !o: ADAM-X-CHAHGE, 

12863 Washburn. Wolcott. NT 14590 

NEW a4-iir. BBS # om S94.9aTa 

COLECO ADAM OWNERS 
Do you need . . . 

1. access to a complete line lover 75 

products in stock) hardware/software? 

1. technical information'instruction 

&• objective reviews of products via 

a MONTHLY newsletter? 

3. Free Ptiljlic Domain software? 

Join liic NIAD ADAM users' group «: 

DISCOUNT buying service now! 

Ilnrmcd November 19841 

Now available (RS232 inlerfaee, 

80 column video. Iraetor-fecd) 

SASE for Free iiifo and catalog 

NIAD, Box 1114, Lisle, IL 60532 

ATl'ENTION ADAM USERS 
Join o\ir liilernalloniil group, bl- 
irionlhh' newsleller. reviews, programs. 
820:6 issues FC AUG. Box 547. Viotoria 
Station, Weslmoutit.QiiebecH3Z2y6 

Join the leading ADAM users' group 
#1 ADAM USERS' GROUP 

Receive "SPRITE CHASER" newsletter. 
Advanced updating, evaluations on 
programs, hardware, technical 
informalion dlrecl from Coicco. 
Problem-solving— program cschange — 
dlscuunJ buying service — eic. 
Send S15 for charter membership to: 
#1 ADAM USERS' GROUP 
Bex 3T6t — AHoi Jay Ferman 
Chcrri' Hill. NJ 08034 
(609l667-2526''VISA'MASTER-^ADDSi 

■VERY COMMODORE 64 FAMILY 
AND EVERY APPLE FAMILY 

should belong to fills club. 

WffY? For free inforniation wrile: 

DISK.A-MONTH CLUB 

Box 936. Ocean Springs. MS 39564 

MSX — Speclravidee users' group 

Send 818 iur Charter membership. 
Box 3761 . Cherry Hill. NJ 08034 
16091667-2526 -viSAMASTER- /\DDS1 



NOVEMBER 1985 107 



ADVERYISER INDEX 

NOVEMBER 
FAMILY COMPUTING 



Advertiser 


Page 


Index 


Ho. 


Adams Apple 


104 


Adams Users Group 


105 


Apple 


C2, 1 


Arrays Inc./Contlnental 




Software 


82 


Atari 


51 


Batteries Included 


54 


Bltcards 


103 


CBS Software 


22 


Cleveland Institute of 




Electronics 


33 


Coleco Industries, Inc. 


34 


COMB 


69 


COMB 


97 


Commodore 


C4 


CompuServe Information 




Systems 


IS, 19 


Computer Direct 


62,63 


Davidson & Associates 


99 


Davidson & Associates 


101 


Designware 


78 


Dldatech Software 


98 


Enterprise. USA 


105 


Eppt i 


27 


Epyx 


29 


Epyx 


73 


Extended Software Co. 


104 


Family Discount Computer 




Products 


32 


FlscherTcehnlk 


71 


CroUer Online Division 


9 


Harcouri Brace Jovanovlch 


77 


Hum's Software Works 


105 


Infocom 


76 


M.W. Ruth 


104 


Maiymac Industries 


105 


Meca 


30,31 


Mimic Systems Inc. 


87 


Mlndscape Inc. 


5-8 


North Hills Corp. 


104 


North Hills Corp. 


105 


NPS, Inc. 


105 


NR] McGraw-Hill 


91 


Okldata 


52.53 


Personal Computer Stationery 


100 


Press A Software 


104 


Protecto Enlerprlzes 


62 


Quest Learning Systems 


73 


Qulnsept, Inc. 


104 


Radio Shack 


11 


Random House 


23 


Random House 


100 


Scholastic Software 


79 


Software Central 


104 


Source, The 


17 


South-VVesiem Publishing Co, 


59 


Spinnaker 


12-14 


Star Micronics 


89 


subLOGIC 


C3 


Tenex Computer Express 


92 


Thomson Computer Products 


2 


Tlmcworks, Inc. 


15 


Tomy Corporation 


61 


U.S. Air Force 


21 


Virtual Combinatlcs (Pinpoint) 


95 


World Book 


24 




Paul Reiss— Associate Pwbiislier (21 a] 505-3589 

Bruce Cardner— Assoc. Adver. Pir. (212) 505-3588 Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana. 
Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan. Minnesota. Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, 
North Dakota. Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Canada 
Jonatlian Wolpert — East (2121 505-3628 Alabama. Connecticut, Delaware, Flori- 
da. Georgia, Kentucky. Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Mississippi, New Hamp- 
shire, New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee. Vermont. 
Virginia, Washington. D.C.. West Virginia 

Pamela Taylor— Northwest (415) 322-1015 Alaska, Arizona, N. California. Colo- 
rado. Idaho. Montana, Oregon, Washington, Wyoming. W. Canada 
Jim Bendei^-Southwest (213) 471-3455 Hawaii. S. California. Nevada. New Mexi- 
co, Texas, Utah 
Greg Rapport— Telemarketing Director (212) 505-3587 



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SubLOCIC Scenery Disks expand tne potential flying environ- 
ment of Flight Simulator II and Microsoft Flight simulator. 

Twelve separate scenery Disks coverthe entire continental 
United States. Each disk covers a geographical region of 
the country, and Includes the major airports, radlo-nav 
aids, cities, highways, rivers, and lakes located in that region. 
Enough detail is available on each disk for either visual or 
Instrument cross-country navigation. 

A STAR scenery Disk (available 4th quarter 1985) covers a 
smaller area with a relatively dense amount of scenery. 
STAR scenery Disks are primarily intended for visual flight 
sight-seeing. They include buildings and landmarks, as well 
as detailed renditions of all major airports in the area. 



y 





1 


^ 




^ 























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V/ 






individual scenery Disit price: $19.95 
Western U.S. (Disks 1 -6h $99.95 

-coming soon - 
Eastern U.S. (Disks 7-12): $99.95 

see Your Dealer. .. 

or write or call for more information. For direct orders 
please specify which disk or disk-set you want. Enclose the 
correct amount plus $2.00 for shipping (S6.00 for the six-disk 
set) and specify UPS orfirst class mall delivery. Visa, Master- 
Card, American Express, and Diners Club cards accepted. 

Commodore Mis a traflemark of commodore Electronics Ltd. 

IBM Is a registered trademark of international Business Machines Corp. 

For the commodore 64"" and IBM PC® 




m^' 



mi^ 



L^UBh 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 44 



LOGIC 

Corporation 

713 Edgebrook Drive 
Champaign IL61B20 

(217) 359-S4B2 Telex: 20e995 



Order Line: (800) 637-4983 

iBxcfljit in lllinos. Alaska, and Hantaa) 



HOW TO EVOLVE 
TO A HIGHER INTELUGENCE, 



§g?£; 



THE COMMODORE 128. 

The first step is buying the 
Commodore 128™ Personal Com- 
pufer. The smartest computer 
available for the price, irs like get- 
ting three computers for less 
than one usually costs. You can run 
CP/M® business software, the 
new programs written for the 128, 
and over 3,000 Commodore 64' 
programs. You start out with more 
software than most machines 
give you after years on the market. 




^"*«a»- 



THE COMMODORE 128 
WORKS FASTER. 

To run all that software and run it 
faster you'll want the 1571 Disk Drive. 
You can't find a faster drive of the 
price. It transfers nearly 1,000 words 
a second (5200 cps), so you can 
load most programs instantly 






THE COMMODORE 128 
GETS SMARTER. 

Novv/ try improving your memory. 
Plug in our 1750 RAM Expansion 
Module and your 128 moves up 
to a powerful 51 2K. Thars enough 
to handle just about anything you 
can dish out, from complicated 
business forecasting to giant 
data bases. 




THE COMMODORE 128 
LEARNS TO COMMUNICATE. 

There's no real intelligence without 
the ability to communicate. So 
you'll want our 1670 Modem/ 1200, 
ft puts you in touch with a new 
world of shopping, banking, 
communications and information 
over your telephone line. And it 
operates at a lightning-fast 1200 
baud to save on your phone bill. 




THE COMMODORE 128 
LEARNS TO WRITE. 

Looking good in print could be 
your next move with the MPS 1000 
Printer. It's a new dot matrix 
printer designed to make the most 
of the 128's speed and high-reso- 
lution graphics. The MPS turns out 
about 1200 words a minute 
(100 cps) of draft-quality printing, or 
gives you near-ietter-quality at 
about 240 words a minute (20 cps). 



THE COMMODORE 128 
IMPROVES YOUR VISION. 

Brains aren't enough without good 
looks, so improve your vision with 
Commodore's new 1902 RGB Color 
Monitor The high-resolution screen 
gives you a sharper image and 
better color than your standard TV, 
so you con really appreciate the 
128's great graphics. 



'•'V 



All these evolutionary steps ahead won't set you back when it comes 

to paying for them. Additions to your Commodore 1 28 ore 

available at a store near you and are as affordable as the 128 itself. 

We think that's a smart way to help you build a computer system. 

®CP/M is o regisiered trodemark of Digiial Research. I nc ©I ?es, Commodofe Elecf ronics Urrlied 

COMMODORE 128^ PERSONAL COMPUTER 

A Higher Intelligence 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 7